Accessibility Policies

Cenotaph

Accessible Customer Service Policy

The City of Peterborough has a policy to help remove barriers for people with disabilities so they can access City goods, services and facilities. The policy guides how we serve people with disabilities.

Purpose, policy statements and application

Purpose

This policy and its related procedures facilitate compliance with the Accessibility Standards for Customer Service Regulation made under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA), and other relevant sections of that Act, and the Ontarians with Disabilities Act (ODA).

Policy statements

The City will use reasonable efforts to ensure that its policies, procedures, and practices regarding the provision of goods and services to all residents, including people with disabilities, are consistent with the following principles:

  • Goods and services will be provided in a manner that respects the dignity and independence of all residents;
  • The provision of goods and services to people with disabilities will be integrated with conventional service unless an alternate measure is necessary, whether temporarily or on a permanent basis, to enable a person with a disability to obtain, use, or benefit from City goods and services; and
  • All residents will be given an equal opportunity to obtain, use, and benefit from City goods and services.

People with disabilities can use assistive devices to obtain, use, or benefit from City goods or services. Exceptions could occur if a customer service representative determines that the assistive device poses a safety risk. In such situations, and in situations where greater accessibility may be provided, customer service representatives will offer alternate service options.

The City will ensure that all customer service representatives receive accessible customer service training in accordance with section 6 of the Accessibility Standards for Customer Service Regulation.

When communicating with a person with a disability, customer service representatives will do so in a manner that takes into account the person’s disability.

Application

This policy and its related procedures apply to:

  • every customer service representative; and
  • anyone who participates in or oversees the development of City policies, practices, and procedures governing the provision of goods or services to members of the public or other third parties.
Definitions and acronyms

Agent

A person or business providing goods or services on behalf of the City through a contract or agreement.

Assistive device

A device that is used by people with disabilities to help with daily living, including cognition aids, communication aids, medical aids, and personal mobility aids. Examples include: wheel chairs, walkers, white canes, oxygen tanks, portable chalkboards, and electronic communication devices.

City

The Corporation of the City of Peterborough.

City goods or services

Goods or services provided by the City or an Agent on behalf of the City.

Customer service representative

An employee, agent, volunteer or otherwise who, on behalf of the City, provides or oversees the provision of City Goods or Services to members of the public or other third parties.

Disability

"Disability" as defined in the Human Rights Code, means:

  • any degree of physical disability, infirmity, malformation or disfigurement that is caused by bodily injury, birth defect or illness and, without limiting the generality of the foregoing, includes diabetes mellitus, epilepsy, a brain injury, any degree of paralysis, amputation, lack of physical coordination, blindness or visual impediment, deafness or hearing impediment, muteness or speech impediment, or physical reliance on a guide dog or other animal or on a wheelchair or other remedial appliance or device;
  • a condition of mental impairment or a developmental disability;
  • a learning disability, or a dysfunction in one or more of the processes involved in understanding or using symbols or spoken language;
  • a mental disorder; or
  • an injury or disability for which benefits were claimed or received under the insurance plan established under the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997.

Third party

A representative of a business or organization who is receiving City Goods or Services or acting in an official capacity. Examples include Provincial inspectors, vendors, or local media.

Appendix and related documents

Pertinent Resources

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (AODA)

Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2001 (ODA)

Accessibility Standards for Customer Service (ACS)

Report CPFPRS09-015 Accessible Customer Service Policy

Committee of the Whole Report 14 of a meeting of June 29, 2009

Minutes of a City Council Meeting of July 6, 2009

Related Policies

Not applicable

Related Procedures

Accessibility Training Procedure

Assistive Devices and Services Procedure

Communicating with People with Disabilities Procedure

Customer Service Feedback Procedure

Notice and Provision of Documents in Accessible Formats Procedure

Service Animals Procedure Support Persons Procedure

Temporary Disruptions Procedure

Related Forms

Accessibility Report Template

Miscellaneous

Accessibility Training Resources

Approval, amendment and review dates

2009-07-06

City Council approved Item 21 of Committee of the Whole Report 14 of a meeting of June 29, 2009, recommending approval of the Accessible Customer Service Policy.

2012-12-21

Review of policy completed by Customer Service office. No changes made to the policy. The next review date is set for 2015-01-01.

2013-01-01

No changes were made to the content of the policy. Policy revised to move to new policy template.

Integrated Accessibility Standards Policy

The City of Peterborough has a policy to help make information, employment, transportation and public spaces more accessible to people with disabilities. The policy guides the City’s accessibility plan and training program, and helps build accessibility into every purchase we make.

Purpose, policy statements and application

Purpose

This policy and its related procedures facilitate compliance with the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation (IASR) of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA), and other relevant sections of that Act, as may be amended from time to time.

This policy and its related procedures facilitate the identification, removal, and prevention of barriers to people with disabilities to enable better access to municipal goods, services and facilities.

Policy statements

The City is committed to meeting the accessibility needs of people with disabilities in a timely manner. To comply with the General Requirements of the IASR, with compliance dates from 2013 to 2014, the City will:

  • establish, maintain, and update a multi-year accessibility plan at least every five years, in accordance with the requirements of section 4 of the IASR, outlining the City's strategy to prevent and remove barriers for people with disabilities and prepare an annual status report on the plan;
  • incorporate accessibility criteria and features when procuring or acquiring goods, services, or facilities, including self-service kiosks, in accordance with the requirements of section 5 of the IASR, except where it is not practicable, the City will provide an explanation, upon request; and
  • ensure that training is provided on the requirements of the accessibility standards in accordance with section 7 of the IASR, as well as the Human Rights Code as it relates to people with disabilities.

To comply with the Information and Communication Standard requirements of the IASR, with compliance dates from 2012 to 2021, the City will create, provide and receive information and communications in ways that are accessible for people with disabilities.

To comply with the Employment Standard requirements of the IASR, with compliance dates from 2012 to 2014, the City will identify, prevent and remove barriers across the employment life cycle for people with disabilities.

To comply with the Transportation Standard requirements of the IASR, with compliance dates from 2011 to 2017, the City will implement accessible transit service and facilities.

Failure to comply with this Policy or the requirements of the IASR could result in penalties as prescribed in Part V of the IASR.

Application

This policy and its related procedures apply to the following, unless otherwise stated:

  • all City employees, volunteers, agencies, boards and commissions; and
  • anyone who participates in or oversees the development of City policies, practices, and procedures governing the provision of municipal goods, services or facilities to members of the public or other third parties.
Definitions and acronyms

Barrier

Obstacles that keep people with disabilities from fully participating in all aspects of society because of their disability. Examples include attitude, technology, architectural/ structural, information and communication, and systemic.

City

The Corporation of the City of Peterborough, its elected and appointed officials, its agencies, boards, commissions, and advisory committees.

Disability

"Disability" as defined in the Human Rights Code, means:

  • any degree of physical disability, infirmity, malformation or disfigurement that is caused by bodily injury, birth defect or illness and, without limiting the generality of the foregoing, includes diabetes mellitus, epilepsy, a brain injury, any degree of paralysis, amputation, lack of physical coordination, blindness or visual impediment, deafness or hearing impediment, muteness or speech impediment, or physical reliance on a guide dog or other animal or on a wheelchair or other remedial appliance or device;
  • a condition of mental impairment or a developmental disability;
  • a learning disability, or a dysfunction in one or more of the processes involved in understanding or using symbols or spoken language;
  • a mental disorder; or
  • an injury or disability for which benefits were claimed or received under the insurance plan established under the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997.

Employment life cycle

Processes involved in designing a job, identifying the essential duties, recruiting and hiring a person to do the job, retention of the employee and termination.

Kiosk

An interactive electronic terminal, including a point-of-sale device, intended for public use that allows users to access one or more services or products or both.

Municipal goods, services or facilities

Goods, services or facilities provided by the City or an agent on behalf of the City.

Third party

A representative of a business or organization who is receiving municipal goods or services or acting in an official capacity. Examples include, but are not limited to, Provincial inspectors, vendors, or local media.

Appendix and related documents

Pertinent Resources

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (AODA)

Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2001 (ODA)

Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation (IASR)

Accessible Vehicles Regulation

Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997

Emergency Management Act, 1990

Report CP12-004 Integrated Accessibility Standards Policy

Related Policies

Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act

Related Procedures

Information and Communication Procedure

Employment Procedure

Transportation Procedure

Customer Service Feedback Procedure

Return to Work Program

Individual Accommodation Request for People with Disabilities

Accessible Format Request for People with Disabilities

Related Forms

Accessible Format Request Form

Individual Accommodation Request Form

Approval, amendment and review dates

2012-09-10

Integrated Accessibility Standards Policy approved by Council.

2013-01-01

No changes were made to the content of the policy. Policy revised to move to new policy template.

Next Review Date

2014-01-01

Accessibility Procedures

The accessibility procedures outline rules on how to serve people with disabilities and how to make information, employment, transportation and public spaces more accessible. The rules help people with disabilities live, work and participate in the community.

Accessible Customer Service Training Procedure

Purpose

This procedure implements, in part, the City of Peterborough’s Accessible Customer Service Policy. The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidelines for accessible customer service training.

Application

This procedure applies to:

  • every customer service representative;
  • anyone who participates in developing City policies, practices, and procedures governing the provision of City goods or services to members of the public or other third parties;
  • premises, where City goods or services are offered, to which the public or other third parties have access; and
  • managers/supervisors of facilities and service areas where City goods or services are provided, who are responsible for ensuring compliance with this procedure.

Procedure

Training program content

The City’s accessible customer service training program will include:

  • a review of the purposes of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act and the requirements of the Customer Service Standard, including the principals of dignity, independence, integration and equal opportunity;
  • the customer service policies and procedures governing the provision of goods or services to people with disabilities;
  • an orientation on disabilities and instructions on how to interact and communicate with people with various types of disabilities;
  • instructions on how to interact with people with disabilities who use an assistive device, service animal or a support person, and how to respond when an issue or problem arises;
  • instructions on how to use the equipment or assistive devices that are provided to assist with the provision of goods or services to people with disabilities; and
  • instructions on what to do if a person with a particular type of disability is having difficulty accessing the City’s goods or services.

The amount and format of training provided will be tailored to suit each position’s interactions with the public or role in the development of policies, procedures and practices pertaining to the provision of goods or services. Where possible, accessibility training will be integrated with other customer service training.

Training records

The Human Resources Division will keep records of accessible customer service training, including the dates on which training was provided and who was trained. All training records will be subject to the requirements of the Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

People to receive training

Training will be provided in accordance with the Guide to the Accessibility Standards for Customer
Service, to the following:

  • Every customer service representative; and
  • Every person who participates in developing the policies and procedures that govern the provision of goods or services to members of the public or other third parties.

Ongoing training for changes to policies, practices and procedures

The City will provide ongoing training in connection with any changes to City policies, practices, and procedures governing the provision of City goods or services to members of the public or other third parties. The type of training provided will reflect the significance of the changes made to the policies, practices, or procedures.

Training timelines

The City will provide accessible customer service training before the Accessibility Standards for Customer Service comes into effect on January 1, 2010. The City will provide accessible customer service training as soon as practicable to:

  • New or reassigned customer service representatives; and
  • New or reassigned people who participate in developing the policies and procedures that govern the provision of goods or services to members of the public or other third parties.
Assistive Devices and Services for People with Disabilities Procedure

Purpose

This procedure implements, in part, the City of Peterborough’s Accessible Customer Service Policy. The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidelines regarding the use and availability of assistive devices, services, and alternate service methods to access City goods or services.

Application

This procedure applies to:

  • every person with a disability who uses an assistive device or would benefit from assistive services or alternate service methods;
  • every customer service representative;
  • anyone who participates in developing City policies, practices, and procedures governing the provision of City goods or services to members of the public or other third parties;
  • premises, where City goods or services are offered, to which the public or other third parties have access; and
  • managers/supervisors of facilities and service areas where City goods or services are provided who are responsible for ensuring compliance with this procedure.

Procedure

Use of personal assistive devices

Customer service representatives will allow people to use their personal assistive devices to access the City’s goods or services.

There may be circumstances where use of a personal assistive device is prohibited by law or is determined by the customer service representative to pose a significant safety risk to the person with a disability or others. In these cases the customer service representative will offer alternate service methods or alternate available assistive devices in consultation with the person with a disability.

The customer service representative will consult with their supervisor or manager when they are uncertain about the use of assistive devices.

Inventory of assistive devices, services and alternate service methods

If a facility or service area that provides City goods or services has an inventory of assistive devices, a list will be compiled and maintained.

Examples of assistive devices:

  • TTY (teletypewriter)
  • Telephones with large numbers
  • Personal amplifiers
  • Sound systems

Examples of assistive services:

  • Guided tours
  • Alternate location for service delivery

Examples of alternate service methods:

  • customer service representative assisting a person to complete a transaction
  • Providing home delivery of goods or services

Providing access to assistive devices, assistive services, and alternate service methods

Customer service representatives will be trained on how to use the equipment or assistive devices available on City premises that may help with the provision of goods or services to people with disabilities. If available, assistive devices, assistive services and alternate service methods will be provided by a customer service representative to any person upon request. Customer service representative's will offer available assistive devices, services, or alternate service methods if:

  • it is readily apparent that a person would benefit from the device or service; or
  • the service is needed as an alternative to a person’s assistive device.
Communicating and Interacting with People with Disabilities Procedure

Purpose

This procedure implements, in part, the City of Peterborough’s Accessible Customer Service Policy. The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidelines for effective communication between customer service representatives and people with disabilities.

Application

This procedure applies to:

  • every customer service representative;
  • anyone who participates in developing City policies, practices, and procedures governing the provision of City goods or services to members of the public or other third parties;
  • premises, where City goods or services are offered, to which the public or other third parties have access; and
  • managers/supervisors of facilities and service areas where City goods or services are provided who are responsible for ensuring compliance with this procedure.

Procedure

Providing customer service to people with disabilities

Customer service representatives will use reasonable efforts to ensure that customer service is consistent with the principles of dignity, independence, integration and equal opportunity. Customer service representatives will consider the following when providing service to people with disabilities:

  • Treat people with disabilities with the same respect and consideration you have for everyone else.
  • Use tolerance, optimism and a willingness to find a way to communicate.
  • Smile and relax.
  • Don’t make assumptions about what type of disability or disabilities a person has.
  • If you're not sure what to do, ask your customer, "How may I help you?". Offer to help. Don’t just jump in. Your customers with disabilities know if they need help and how you can provide it.
  • Some disabilities are not visible. Take the time to get to know your customers’ needs.
  • Find a good way to communicate. A good start is to listen carefully.
  • If you can’t understand what your customer is saying, just politely ask again.
  • Be patient. People with some kinds of disabilities may take a little longer to understand and respond.
  • Look at your customer, but don’t stare. Speak directly to a person with a disability, not to their support person.
  • Use plain language and speak in short sentences.
  • Don’t touch or address service animals. They are working and have to pay attention at all times.
  • Be knowledgeable of best practices, accommodations and special services available.

How to provide customer service to people with specific disabilities

Each person with a disability may need a slightly different type of accommodation to receive City services. Customer service representatives will communicate in a way that takes a person’s disability into account. They will provide customer service in a way that demonstrates an understanding of the typical needs of the various types of disabilities.

Physical disabilities

Physical disabilities include a range of functional limitations from minor difficulties in moving or coordinating one part of the body, to muscle weakness, tremors, and paralysis. Physical disabilities can be congenital such as muscular dystrophy, or acquired, such as tendonitis. A physical disability may affect an individual’s ability to:

  • perform manual tasks such as holding a pen, turning a key or gripping a doorknob;
  • move around independently;
  • control the speed or coordination of movements;
  • reach, pull, or manipulate objects; and
  • have strength or endurance.

To communicate and interact effectively with people with physical disabilities, customer service representatives will:

  • avoid touching, moving, or leaning on wheelchairs or other mobility devices as they are part of the person’s personal space;
  • keep ramps and corridors free of clutter;
  • step around a counter to provide service if it is too high or wide; and
  • provide seating for those that cannot stand in line.

Hearing disabilities

Hearing disabilities can cause problems with distinguishing certain frequencies, sounds, or words. A person who is deaf, deafened or hard-of hearing may be unable to:

  • use a traditional public telephone;
  • understand speech in noisy environments; and
  • pronounce words clearly enough to be easily understood;

To communicate and interact effectively with people with hearing disabilities, customer service representatives will:

  • direct their attention to the person with a hearing disability, instead of the person’s interpreter;
  • write notes back and forth to share information, if necessary;
  • provide documents or images to provide information;
  • face the person and keep their hands and other objects away from their face and mouth;
  • speak clearly at a moderate pace and avoid shouting; and
  • verify that all parties understand what has been communicated.

Deaf-blindness disabilities

Deaf-blindness disabilities involve a combination of hearing and vision loss. The result for a person who is deaf-blind is significant difficulty accessing information and performing daily activities. Deaf-blindness interferes with communication, learning, orientation, and mobility. People who are deaf-blind communicate using any combination of various sign language systems, Braille, telephone devices, and communication boards.

Many people who are deaf-blind use the services of an intervener who relay information, facilitate auditory and visual information, and act as sighted guides.

To communicate and interact effectively with people with deaf-blindness disabilities, customer service representatives will:

  • start by verbally identifying themselves;
  • be patient and understand that communication may take some time;
  • direct their attention to the person with a deaf-blindness disability, instead of the person’s intervener; and
  • verify that all parties understand what has been communicated.

Visual disabilities

Visual disabilities range from slightly reduced visual acuity to total blindness. Vision loss can result in:

  • difficulty reading or seeing faces;
  • difficulty maneuvering in unfamiliar places;
  • inability to differentiate colours or distances; 
  • a narrow field of vision;
  • the need for bright light, or contrast; and
  • night blindness.

To communicate and interact effectively with people with vision disabilities, customer service representatives will:

  • start by verbally identifying themselves;
  • speak clearly and at a moderate pace;
  • avoid touching service animals. They are working animals;
  • verbally describe the setting, form, and location as necessary; and
  • offer their arm to guide the person, without grabbing or pulling the person.

Intellectual disabilities

Intellectual disabilities affect a person’s ability to think and reason. A person with an intellectual disability may have difficulty with:

  • standard information, either written or spoken;
  • conceptual information;
  • perception of sensory information; and
  • memory.

To communicate and interact effectively with people with intellectual disabilities, customer service representatives will:

  • use clear and simple language at a moderate pace;
  • be prepared to explain and provide examples regarding information;
  • remember that the person is an adult and, unless otherwise determined, can make their own decisions;
  • be patient; and
  • verify that all parties understand what has been communicated.

Speech disabilities

Speech disabilities involve the partial or total loss of the ability to speak. Typical speech disabilities include problems with:

  • pronunciation;
  • pitch and loudness;
  • hoarseness or breathiness; and
  • stuttering or slurring.

To communicate and interact effectively with people with speech disabilities, customer service representatives will:

  • communicate in a quiet environment, if possible, in order to better hear the customer;
  • give the customer full attention and avoid interrupting or finishing sentences;
  • ask the customer to repeat as necessary, or to write a message; and
  • verify that all parties understand what has been communicated.

Learning disabilities

Learning disabilities are generally invisible and can result in a host of different communications difficulties for people. Learning disabilities include a range of disorders that effect verbal and nonverbal information acquisition, retention, understanding, and processing. People with learning disabilities have average or above average intelligence, but take in and process information and express knowledge in different ways. Learning disabilities can result in difficulties with:

  • written communication;
  • problem solving;
  • time management;
  • way finding; and
  • information processing.

To communicate and interact effectively with people with learning disabilities, customer service representatives will:

  • be patient and willing to find a way to communicate;
  • ask “How may I help you?”;
  • speak clearly and directly to the customer ar a moderate pace;
  • respond to any requests for verbal information;
  • offer assistance in completing forms;
  • allow extra time to complete tasks if necessary; and
  • verify that all parties understand what has been communicated.

Mental health disabilities

Customer service representatives will not know that a customer has a mental health disability unless they are informed of it. Usually mental health disabilities will not affect customer service at all. Mental health disabilities include a range of disorders, however there are three main types of mental health disabilities:

  • behavioural;
  • anxiety; and
  • mood.

If someone is experiencing difficulty in controlling their symptoms, they may seem edgy or irritated; act aggressively; be perceived as pushy or abrupt or be unable to make a decision. To communicate and interact effectively with people with mental health disabilities, customer service representatives will:

  • treat each person as an individual - ask what would make them the most comfortable and respect their needs as much as possible;
  • try to reduce stress and anxiety in situations; and
  • stay calm and courteous and focus on the service they need and how to help, even if the person exhibits unusual behaviour.

Smell disabilities

Smell disabilities can involve the inability to sense smells or a hypersensitivity to odors and smells. A person with a smelling disability may have allergies or sensitivities to certain odors, scents, or chemicals or may be unable to identify dangerous gases, smoke, fumes and spoiled food.

Customer service representatives will not know that a customer has a smell disability unless they are informed of it. Usually smell disabilities will not affect customer service.

If a customer identifies that they have a smell disability, the customer service representative will ask “How may I help you?” and will make reasonable efforts to deliver service in a way that takes the person’s ability into account. For example, a customer with a sensitivity to scents may need to be served by an alternate customer service representative who is not wearing perfume.

Touch disabilities

Touch disabilities can affect a person’s ability to sense texture, temperature, vibration, or pressure. Touch sensations may be reduced or heightened. This could result in either a hypersensitivity to touch, temperature, or the opposite, numbness and the inability to feel touch sensations.

Customer service representatives will not know that a customer has a touch disability unless they are informed of it. Usually touch disabilities will not affect customer service.

If a customer identifies that they have a touch disability, the customer service representative will ask “How may I help you?” and will make reasonable efforts to deliver service in a way that takes the person’s ability into account. For example, a customer with a sensitivity to temperature may need to be served in an alternate location that is more temperate.

Taste disabilities

Taste disabilities can limit the experience of the four primary taste sensations: sweet, bitter, salty, and sour. A person with a taste disability may be unable to identify spoiled food or noxious substances.

Customer service representatives will not know that a customer has a taste disability unless they are informed of it. Usually taste disabilities will not affect customer service.

If a customer identifies that they have a taste disability, the customer service representative will ask “How may I help you?” and will make reasonable efforts to deliver service in a way that takes the person’s ability into account. For example, a customer with a taste disability may need a customer service representative to confirm the freshness of a food item.

Other disabilities

Other disabilities result from a range of other conditions, accidents, illnesses, and diseases including ALS, asthma, diabetes, cancer, HIV/AIDs, environmental sensitivities, seizure disorders, heart disease, stroke and joint replacement.

Customer service representatives may not know that a customer has another disability unless they are informed of it. If a customer identifies that they have another disability, the customer service representative will ask “How may I help you?” and will make reasonable efforts to deliver service in a way that takes the person’s ability into account. For example, a customer with heart disease may need a chair to sit during lengthy transactions.

Serving people with disabilities on the telephone

To communicate effectively with people with disabilities on the telephone, customer service representatives will:

  • speak clearly and directly;
  • concentrate on what is being said;
  • be patient and not interrupt or finish the person’s sentences. Give the customer time to explain themself;
  • ask the customer to clarify if the customer service representative does not understand. Avoid guessing what the customer is saying;
  • if uncertain what was said, repeat or rephrase what they have heard;
  • if a telephone customer is using an interpreter or a TTY line, direct your conversation to the customer through the interpreter or TTY; and
  • if the customer has great difficulty communicating, offer to make arrangements to call back when it’s convenient to speak to a support person.
Feedback for Accessible Customer Service Procedure

Purpose

This procedure implements, in part, the City of Peterborough’s Accessible Customer Service Policy.
The purpose of this procedure is to establish guidelines for receiving feedback from people about the
delivery of goods or services to people with disabilities and will serve to improve overall customer
service.

Application

This procedure applies to:

  • formal feedback, received through the City’s website (www.peterborough.ca), by telephone, in person, in writing, in electronic format or through any other manner, that addresses the provision of City goods or services to a person with a disability;
  • every customer service representative;
  • anyone who participates in developing City policies, practices, and procedures governing the provision of City goods or services to members of the public or other third parties;
  • premises, where City goods or services are offered, to which the public or other third parties have access; and
  • managers/supervisors of facilities and service areas where City goods or services are provided who are responsible for ensuring compliance with this procedure.

Procedure

Receiving feedback

The City of Peterborough is committed to providing high quality goods or services to all members of the public it serves. Feedback from the public is welcomed as it may identify areas that require change or improvement.

Feedback from a member of the public about the delivery of goods or services to people with disabilities will be encouraged through the City’s website (www.peterborough.ca). Feedback may also be given by telephone, in person, in writing, in electronic format or through any other manner. The feedback will be submitted to the Customer Service Coordinator.

Responding to feedback

The Customer Service Coordinator will be responsible for assessing whether a response is necessary and ensuring a response is provided. When a response is necessary, the Customer Service Coordinator will work with an appropriate customer service representative and will use reasonable effort to respond to anyone providing feedback regarding the provision of accessible goods or services. The response will be made in a manner that takes a person’s disability into account.

The Customer Service Coordinator or a customer service representative may need to contact a feedback provider for further information or clarification regarding their feedback.

Whether a response is necessary or not, the Customer Service Coordinator will work with the appropriate customer service representative or manager/supervisor of the facility or service area to ensure the feedback is taken into consideration for future provision of goods or services.

Providing notice of the feedback process

Information about the feedback process will be readily available to the public. Notice of the process and the feedback form will be posted on the City’s website (www.peterborough.ca) and will be provided in other formats are requested.

Availability of Accessible Customer Service Documents Procedure

Purpose

This procedure implements, in part, the City of Peterborough’s Accessible Customer Service Policy. The purpose of this procedure is to provide instructions regarding how the City will provide notice of the availability of documents and the manner and format by which documents will be provided.

Application

This procedure applies to:

  • every customer service representative;
  • anyone who participates in developing City policies, practices, and procedures governing the provision of City goods or services to members of the public or other third parties; and
  • managers/supervisors of facilities and service areas where City goods or services are provided who are responsible for ensuring compliance with this procedure.

This procedure includes only original City documents developed in response to the Accessibility Standards for Customer Service, as detailed later in this procedure.

This procedure does not include other City documents. For example, this procedure does not require the City’s Official Plan to be provided in accessible formats.

Procedure

Documents available in accessible formats

The City will ensure that a document describing the following policies and procedures is available in accessible formats:

  • Accessible customer service policy
  • Accessible customer service training procedure
  • Assistive devices procedure
  • Availability of accessible customer service documents procedure
  • Feedback on the provision of goods and services to people with disabilities procedure
  • Notice of temporary service disruptions procedure
  • Service animals procedure
  • Support persons procedure
  • Communicating and interacting with people with disabilities procedure

Accessible formats

When providing a document to a person with a disability, the City will provide the document, or the information contained in the document, in a format that takes the person’s disability into account.

Providing notice of availability of accessible documents

The City will notify the public and other third parties regarding the availability of accessible customer service documents on the website www.peterborough.ca. The notice will:

  • indicate that the document is available in accessible formats;
  • provide a link to an electronic, plain-text version of the document; and
  • explain how to request alternate formats.

Requests for accessible customer service documents

Accessible customer service document(s) will be available to the public at www.peterborough.ca.

Anyone can request and obtain a copy of the City’s accessible customer service documents. Requests can be made in person to any customer service representative. Requests submitted by telephone, website, e-mail, facsimile, or in writing will be directed to the Customer Service Coordinator.

When a customer service representative receives a request for an accessible customer service document the customer service representative will:

  • ask the person if they would like the document in an accessible format. If so, ask the person’s preferred format; and
  • if the document can be readily produced in the requested format, provide the person with the document as soon as is reasonably possible and confirm that the format is acceptable; or
  • if the document cannot be readily produced in the requested format, contact the Customer Service Coordinator to address the request. The customer service representative will provide the Customer Service Coordinator with the customer’s name and preferred contact information. The Customer Service Coordinator will consult with the person with a disability to determine an alternate format that is acceptable. When the person receives the document, the Customer Service Coordinator will confirm that the format is acceptable.

The Customer Service Coordinator will make every reasonable effort to ensure that requests for accessible customer service documents do not take significantly longer than requests for the same documents in standard print.

Service Animals for People with Disabilities Procedure

Purpose

This procedure implements, in part, the City of Peterborough’s Accessible Customer Service Policy. The purpose of this procedure is to provide information regarding the use of service animals by people with disabilities when obtaining, using, or benefiting from City goods or services.

Application

This procedure applies to:

  • every person with a disability who uses a service animal;
  • every customer service representative;
  • anyone who participates in developing City policies, practices, and procedures governing the provision of City goods or services to members of the public or other third parties;
  • premises, where City goods or services are offered, to which the public or other third parties have access; and
  • managers/supervisors of facilities and service areas where City goods or services are provided who are responsible for ensuring compliance with this procedure.

Procedure

Identifying service animals

Service animals are typically recognized by a harness or a sign. If it is not readily apparent that the animal is used by the person for reasons related to their disability, the customer service representative may request that the person with the disability provides documentation from a health care practitioner confirming that the person requires the animal for reasons relating to the disability.

Examples of service animals include:

  • A guide dog;
  • Hearing alert animals;
  • Animals trained to alert persons to oncoming seizures; and
  • Animals trained to assist people with autism, mental health disabilities, physical disabilities, and other disabilities.

Service animals are not pets

Service animals are working animals, and they are not considered pets. For this reason, they are not to be treated like a pet. When a person with a service animal is seeking City goods or services, a customer service representative will not:

  • touch the animal;
  • make eye contact with the animal;
  • talk to the animal;
  • attempt to feed the animal; and
  • give the animal any form of attention.

Areas open to service animals

Service animals may enter into any property where City goods or services are offered unless the presence of the animal is prohibited by law.

In some City locations there may be a rule of “No Pets Allowed”. In such situations, this rule does not apply to service animals.

Areas closed to service animals

Service animals may not enter into an area where the presence of an animal is prohibited by law. For example, service animals may enter into an area where food is served, but may not enter into an area where food is prepared.

Alternate service options where animals are restricted by law

If a person with a service animal enters into an area where the presence of the animal is prohibited by law, the customer service representative will:

  • inform the person with the service animal why the animal is not permitted in the area;
  • offer to provide the goods or services in a location where the presence of the animal is permitted; and
  • if a reasonable alternate location is not available and if the person is willing to be separated from the animal, the customer service representative will offer a safe location where the animal can wait and offer assistance to the person with a disability while they are separated from the service animal. For example, a person with vision loss might need someone to guide them.

Allergies and service animals

It is the City’s duty to provide the greatest amount of accommodation for the person with the service animal, however this should not be at the expense of another person. In all situations where a person announces they are allergic to a service animal, customer service representatives should discuss the situation with the affected person(s) and make every effort to meet the needs of all parties.

If a customer service representative is allergic to a service animal, the customer service representative will:

  • seek an alternate qualified customer service representative to provide the goods or services to the person with the service animal; or
  • seek an alternate location to provide the goods or services to the person with the disability; or
  • if an alternate qualified customer service representative is not reasonably available and the person is willing to be separated from the animal, offer a safe location where the animal can wait and offer assistance to the person with a disability while they are separated from the service animal. For example, a person with vision loss might need someone to guide them.

If a member of the public or a third party is allergic to a service animal, the customer service representative will seek an alternate location to provide the goods or services to that person or invite them to wait in a different location until the person with the service animal has vacated the area of service. If relocation would provide greater accommodation for the person with the service animal, the customer service representative will invite the person with the service animal to relocate. If a person has to remove themself from a waiting area due to an allergic reaction, the customer service representative will make reasonable efforts to ensure that they do not lose their place in the sequence.

Support Persons for People with Disabilities Procedure

Purpose

This procedure implements, in part, the City of Peterborough’s Accessible Customer Service Policy. The purpose of this procedure is to direct the provision of City goods or services to people with disabilities when they are accompanied by a support person.

This procedure directs when the City may require a person with a disability to be accompanied by a support person in order to obtain, use, or benefit from City goods or services.

Application

This procedure applies to:

  • every situation where a person with a disability is accompanied, or is required to be accompanied, by a support person;
  • every customer service representative;
  • anyone who participates in developing City policies, practices, and procedures governing the provision of City goods or services to members of the public or other third parties;
  • premises, where City goods or services are offered, to which the public or other third parties have access; and
  • managers/supervisors of facilities and service areas where City goods or services are provided who are responsible for ensuring compliance with this procedure.

Identifying support persons

A support person may be a personal support worker, volunteer, friend, or family member. They may help a person with a disability with communicating, personal care, mobility, sensory or emotional support or medical care.

In some situations, it may not be clear which person is the support person. A person with a disability might not introduce their support person. To determine who is the support person, customer service representatives should take the lead from the person who is requesting the goods or services, or ask.

When it is determined who the customer is, customer service representatives should speak directly to the customer, not the support person.

Areas open to support persons

A person with a disability and their support person are permitted to enter into any area where City goods or services are offered. Unless otherwise requested by a person with a disability, customer service representatives will permit the support person to remain with the person with a disability throughout the entire duration of obtaining, using, or benefiting from City goods or services.

Confidential information

When a customer service representative must discuss confidential information with a person who is accompanied by a support person, the customer service representative will ask the person with a disability whether the support person may remain present. If the person with the disability chooses not to have the support person present, the customer service representative will offer a close and comfortable location where the support person can wait.

Lack of adequate space

If there is not adequate space to provide City goods or services to a person with a disability and their support person, a customer service representative should arrange for an alternate location with adequate space. If an alternate location is not available, the customer service representative will:

  • make a reasonable effort to accommodate both the person with a disability and the support person within the available space; and
  • if reasonable, offer a close and comfortable location where the support person can wait, preferably where they can remain within sight of each other.

Appropriate behaviour

Support persons are required to adhere to the same rules and demonstrate appropriate behaviour, as are all other persons receiving City goods or services.

Admission fees for support persons

The City will provide notice in advance about what admission fee will be charged for support persons, if applicable.

When a support person is required

The City may require a support person to accompany a person with a disability when a support person is necessary to protect the health or safety of the person with a disability or the health or safety of others.

Temporary Service Disruptions Procedure

Purpose

This procedure implements, in part, the City of Peterborough’s Accessible Customer Service Policy. The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidelines for providing notice when there is a service disruption.

Application

This procedure applies to:

  • every temporary disruption to a location, technology, or method that could be used by a person with a disability to access City goods or services, whether planned or unplanned;
  • every customer service representative;
  • anyone who participates in developing City policies, practices, and procedures governing the provision of City goods or services to members of the public or other third parties;
  • premises, where City goods or services are offered, to which the public or other third parties have access; and
  • managers/supervisors of facilities and service areas where City goods or services are provided who are responsible for ensuring compliance with this procedure.

Notices of a temporary service disruption will be initiated and prepared by the manager/supervisor of the facility or service area that is experiencing the disruption. The format and content of such notices should be in accordance with this procedure.

Procedure

When a notice of temporary service disruption is required

Notice is required for every planned or unplanned disruption that could affect people with disabilities, such as the unavailability of an assistive device, service, or feature that is regularly available to enable or enhance access to goods or services.

The manager/supervisor of the facility or service area will provide notice as soon as possible if any facilities, services or access to services are disrupted. Examples of services or access to services include, but are not limited to:

  • accessible entrance;
  • accessible washroom;
  • elevator;
  • accessible parking;
  • power-operated door;
  • ramp;
  • amplification systems;
  • TTY;
  • transportation corridors (i.e. sidewalks, walkways, trails, roads etc.); and
  • any other assistive device, service, or feature that provides access to services commonly used by people with disabilities.

When a notice of temporary service disruption is not required

Generally, disruptions to City services, such as during a power outage or during a labour dispute, notice about how the disruption could affect people with disabilities is not required. However, if the disruption has a significant impact on people with disabilities, the manager/supervisor of the facility or service area should provide notice of the disruption.

Providing notice

Notice of temporary service disruptions will be provided by the manager/supervisor of the facility or service area. For planned disruptions, notice will be provided within a reasonable time in advance. For unplanned disruptions, notice will be provided as soon as possible.

To provide notice of a temporary service disruption, the manager/supervisor will use:

  • a printed notice, using the City’s notice of temporary service disruption template, posted at public entry points and key locations around the service disruption; and
  • the City’s website, through consultation with the Customer Service Coordinator.

If appropriate the manager/supervisor may also use:

  • voice mail messages;
  • local media, such as newspaper, radio, television, or websites, through consultation with the Customer Service Coordinator; and
  • any other method that is reasonable in the circumstances.

When providing notice of a temporary service disruption, the manager/supervisor will include:

  • the reason for the disruption;
  • anticipated duration of the disruption;
  • a description of alternative facilities or services, if any, that are available; and
  • their contact information.

When providing notice of a temporary service disruption, the manager/supervisor will ensure the notice is accessible to its audience. For example, if an elevator is unavailable, post a notice at each entrance at a height that will allow a person in a wheelchair to read it.

 

IASR Employment Procedure

Purpose

This procedure implements, in part, the City’s Integrated Accessibility Standards Policy.

This procedure provides a framework for integrating accessibility into the City’s employment processes and establishes guidelines to ensure accessibility for people with disabilities across all stages of the employment life cycle. The intent is to allow all employees to reach their full potential by ensuring that the City provides an accessible workplace.

This procedure assists in the requirement to comply with sections 22 to 32 of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation (IASR) made under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA).

Application

This procedure applies to all employees of the City and applicants responding to or participating in City recruitment processes.

This Procedure does not apply to volunteers and other non-paid individuals.

This Procedure does not replace or affect legal rights or obligations that arise under Ontario’s Human Rights Code, the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act and other laws relating to the accommodation of people with disabilities.

Procedure

Accessible work environment, general

The City will:

  • make reasonable effort to create an overall accessible work environment;
  • create a suitable accessible work environment for an employee with a disability, as soon as practicable after the City becomes aware of their disability; and
  • consult with the employee to take into account their accessibility needs.

Employees are responsible to make the City aware of their disability. However, if an employee appears to be struggling in the workplace or is clearly unwell, supervisors can consult with the City’s human resources division to obtain advice.

Recruitment

Throughout each phase of the City’s recruitment, assessment, and selection processes, the City will:

  • notify job applicants that accommodations for people with disabilities will be provided, upon request. Notification will be provided on the City employment opportunities website page and on the job posting;
  • notify job applicants who have been selected to participate in an assessment or selection process, that accommodations for people with disabilities are available to support their participation in the process, upon request. Notification should occur at the time that the applicant is being invited to participate in a particular assessment or selection process;
  • consult with job applicants who request accommodations and provide or arrange for suitable accommodation in a manner that takes into account the person’s accessibility needs; and
  • notify the successful applicant that the City has policies and procedures for accommodating employees with disabilities. This notification will be included in the letter of offer.

Informing employees of supports

The City will provide the policies and procedures for accommodating employees with disabilities to:

  • new City employees as soon as practicable after they begin their employment, as part of their employment orientation; and
  • all City employees on the City’s accessibility, human resources and policy intranet pages.

Whenever there is a change to existing policies and procedures for accommodating employees with disabilities, updated information will be made electronically available by the division responsible for the document.

Accessible formats and communication supports for employees

To ensure that information and communications are accessible for employees with disabilities, the City will:

  • Provide accessible formats and communication supports, upon request, for general information available to all employees and information required to perform the job effectively;
  • consult with the employee making the request to determine which accessible format or communication support is required;
  • include the employee’s appropriate accessible format and communication support in their individual accommodation plan, should one exist; and
  • ensure accessible formats and communication supports are carried out in accordance with the City’s Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation Information and Communications procedure.

Workplace emergency response information

The prepare for the specific needs of employees with disabilities in emergency situations such as fire, power outages, severe weather, natural disasters and security incidents, the City will:

  • develop individualized workplace emergency response information for employees who have a disability if individualized information is necessary and the City has been made aware of the employee’s need for accommodation due to the disability. Individualized workplace emergency response information is not required for employees if the City is unaware of their disability;
  • develop the individualized workplace emergency response information as soon as practicable after the City becomes aware of the need for accommodation;
  • provide the individualized workplace emergency response information, with the employee’s consent, to a designated person that will assist the employee;
  • ensure the employee’s privacy is respected by not disclosing the details of the employee’s disability; and
  • review the individualized workplace emergency response information when the employee moves to a different location in the organization, when the employee’s overall accommodation needs or plans are reviewed and when the City reviews its general emergency response policies. This will ensure the information is effective and up to date.

Individual accommodation plans

The City will develop written individual accommodation plans for employees with disabilities that will consider at a minimum:

  • the manner in which the employee can participate in the development of the plan;
  • the manner in which the City can request an evaluation by an outside medical or other expert, at the employer’s expense, to determine if and how accommodation can be achieved;
  • the manner in which the employee can request the participation of a representative from their bargaining unit, where applicable, or other representative from the workplace, in the development of the plan;
  • the steps that will be undertaken to protect the privacy of the employee’s personal information;
  • the frequency with which the individual accommodation plan will be reviewed and updated and the manner in which it will be done;
  • if an individual accommodation plan is denied, the manner in which the reasons for the denial will be provided to the employee; and
  • the means of providing the individual accommodation plan in a format that takes into account the employee’s accessibility needs due to disability.

Individual accommodation plans will include any information regarding accessible formats and communications supports that are to be provided, the individualized workplace emergency response Information, and any other accommodation that is to be provided, upon request.

Individualized accommodation plans are not required for employees of which the City has not been made aware of their disability.

Return to work process

The City will ensure the written return to work process will adequately support employees who have been absent from work due to a disability and who require accommodations to return to work. The process will address the following at a minimum:

  • outline the steps the City will take to facilitate the return to work, including the development of an individual accommodation plan;
  • provide return to work processes for employees who have permanent, recurring or temporary disabilities. For example, return to work accommodations may be appropriate when an employee has a broken leg, radiation therapy treatment, episodes of mental illness, etc.; and
  • acknowledge that the return to work process does not replace or override any other return to work process under any other statute such as Ontario’s Human Rights Code and the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act.

Performance management, career development and advancement, and redeployment

The City will take into account the accessibility needs of employees with disabilities and individual accommodation plans in the performance management process, when providing career development and advancement opportunities and when considering redeployment.

IASR Information and Communication Procedure

Purpose

This Procedure implements, in part, the City’s Accessible Customer Service Policy and the Integrated Accessibility Standards Policy.

This Procedure provides direction to City Representatives on how to create, notify, receive and provide information and communications in ways that are accessible for people with disabilities. The intent is to help people with disabilities access sources of information and communications that people rely on every day.

This Procedure assists in the requirement to comply with sections 11 to 14 and section 19 of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation (IASR) made under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA).

Application

This Procedure applies to every City representative that will create, notify, receive and provide information and communications.

This Procedure does not apply to:

  • products or product labels, unless otherwise stated;
  • unconvertible information and communications; and
  • information and communications that the City can’t control.

Procedure

Accessible formats and communication supports

The City will create accessible formats and communication supports. City Representatives will ensure Information is formatted to comply with the City’s guide to accessible documents. Information formatted to meet the guide will most often result in an appropriate accessible format and communication support. For example, the information will be compatible with screen reading software, which means a document can be emailed to a person with vision loss and used with their own assistive technology. There may be instances when Information formatted to meet the City’s “Guide to Accessible Documents” does not result in an appropriate Accessible Format and Communication Support. In these instances, an alternate format will be provided, upon request. Formatting a document to the guide will ensure it is Conversion Ready.

The City will notify the public of accessible formats and communication supports. The Accessibility Coordinator will provide notification to the public about the availability of accessible formats and communication supports on the City’s main website. The request for information in an accessible format form will be linked to the public notice. City organizations with a website external to www.peterborough.ca will provide notification to the public about the availability of accessible formats and communication supports on their own website, with a link to either their own request for information in an accessible format form or the form on the City’s website.

The City will receive requests for accessible formats and communication supports. A person who requires information in an accessible format may complete the request for information in an accessible format form and submit by email, telephone, facsimile, mail or in person. City Representatives will receive requests submitted in person or by telephone. The Accessibility Coordinator will receive requests submitted by email, fax, or mail.

The City will respond to requests for accessible formats and communication supports. City Representatives will provide accessible formats and communication supports for people with disabilities, upon request, and will consult with the person making the request to make sure the appropriate format or support is provided. For example, not all people who are blind use Braille. Information provided in large print format may be acceptable; provide information in a timely manner that takes into account the person’s needs due to the disability. It will not take significantly longer than requests for the same Information available in standard format; provide information at a cost that is no more than the regular cost charged to others; explain why, if it is not possible to provide information in an accessible format, and provide a summary of content related to the unconvertible information; and forward the customer’s contact information to the Accessibility Coordinator, if further assistance with the response to the request is required. The Accessibility Coordinator will consult with the customer to find a suitable alternative solution.

The City will train City representatives on accessible formats and communication supports. The Accessibility Coordinator will provide training on the rules outlined in the City’s guide to accessible documents.

Feedback

City representatives that create feedback forms or receive and respond to feedback will:

  • ensure that the process is accessible to people with disabilities;
  • provide accessible formats and appropriate communications supports, upon request; and
  • continue with the obligations of the Feedback for Accessible Customer Service procedure. The procedure includes Information on how to provide notice of the feedback process, receive feedback and respond to feedback.

Emergency procedures, plans or public safety information

The City will provide emergency procedures, plans or public safety Information that is available to the public, in an accessible format or provide them with appropriate communication supports, upon request, as soon as practicable. This procedure does not apply to real-time public safety information used during an actual emergency, such as an evacuation.

The City will determine what information is to be made available to the public. This may include incidents that threaten life, property, operations or the environment. This includes information governed by legislation such as, but not limited to Ontario's Fire Code and the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. All buildings required to have a fire safety plan as per 2.8.1.1 of Ontario’s Fire Code, must keep the plan in an approved location in the building, and the City shall have a publicly shared all-hazards emergency plan.

Accessible websites and web content

The City will make websites accessible to people with disabilities by conforming to international standards for website accessibility.

Content providers and content approvers will ensure websites and website based applications published after January 1, 2012, conform to WCAG 2.0 Level A by January 1, 2014 and Level AA by January 1, 2021; ensure website content, including information in Word and PDF format, published after January 1, 2012, are formatted to comply with the City’s guide to accessible documents by January 1, 2014; and make revisions to website content that is not in compliance with WCAG, as reported by information technology services.

Information Technology Services will use tools, such as a website governance service, to report any accessibility compliance errors; notify content providers of website accessibility compliance errors and direct them to make revisions to ensure compliance with WCAG; and assist content providers with website revisions, if required.

Compliance with the requirements of WCAG 2.0 does not apply to:

  • websites and website based applications that rely on the availability of commercial software and/or tools, the City does not control directly, or have a contractual relationship that does not allow for modification of the product;
  • intranet website;
  • subtitles for real-time audio and video, as described in WCAG 2.0 Level AA, success criteria 1.2.4 Captions (Live);
  • subtitles for pre-recorded video content, as described in WCAG 2.0 Level AA, success criteria 1.2.5 Audio Descriptions (Pre-recorded); and
  • technological software limitations such as online mapping and complex diagrams.

In such cases, an accessible alternate version or summary of the content related to the Unconvertible Information will be provided, upon request.

Public libraries

The Peterborough Public Library will:

  • provide or arrange for people with disabilities to obtain accessible formats of library materials in the library’s collections, where the materials exist;
  • provide public information about the availability of accessible materials and communication supports. Provide the public information in an accessible format or with appropriate communication supports, upon request. For example, the Peterborough Public Library may post the information on their website, library posters, promotional materials, etc; and
  • consider accessibility when procuring new library materials, so that collections are accessible to the widest range of people.
IASR Purchasing Procedure

Purpose

This procedure implements, in part, the City’s Integrated Accessibility Standards Policy and is in accordance with Part 3 (10) of the City’s purchasing by-law, as may be amended, which requires that accessibility design, criteria and features be incorporated when procuring or purchasing City goods, services and/or facilities, where practicable.

This procedure provides direction to City representatives on how to incorporate accessibility design, criteria and features into the purchasing process for goods, services and/or facilities. The intent is to make purchases more accessible to people with disabilities, unless it is not practicable to do so. This procedure will assist in the requirement to comply with Section 5 of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation.

This procedure also ensures City representatives take steps to make self-service kiosks accessible to people with disabilities so they can be used independently and securely by people with disabilities as required by Section 6 of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation.

Application

This procedure applies to:

  • every City representative who purchases goods, services and/or facilities for the City; and
  • every City representative who oversees and/or approves the purchasing of goods, services and/or facilities.

Procedure

The City representative will investigate and inquire about the accessibility design, criteria and features of the proposed goods, services and/or facilities and consider the following general principles of accessibility. Keeping in mind the various types of disabilities, ask questions such as, but not limited to:

  • Independence (Can a person with a disability have freedom from control or influence of others and do things in their own way, without assistance from others, when using the good, service and/or facility?);
  • Dignity (Can a person with a disability feel as valued, deserving and respected as a person without a disability when using the good, service and/or facility?);
  • Equality (Can a person with a disability have the same options, benefits and results as a person without a disability when using the good, service and/or facility?); and
  • Integration (Can a person with a disability receive the full benefit, in the same place and in a similar way as a person without a disability when using the good, service and/or facility? Has the City representative considered inclusiveness and full participation?).

The City representative will ensure that the item being purchased does not pose a barrier for people with disabilities by incorporating accessibility design, criteria and features into the purchasing process. Ask questions such as, but not limited to:

  • Goods (Can the goods be used by someone in a seated position? Can the goods be used by someone with one hand, with limited upper body strength, or limited fine motor skills? Can the goods be used by someone with vision loss or low vision? Can the goods be used by someone with hearing loss? Can the goods be used by someone with a learning or developmental disability? Does the good meet ergonomic standards and can it be customized to meet a variety of needs? Are support materials, such as manuals, training or service calls, available in accessible formats at no additional charge?);
  • Services (Has the service provider completed training in accessible customer service as required in the Accessible Customer Service Standards under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act? Can the service provider accommodate the needs of people with various types of disabilities? For example, do their presentations accommodate people with different types of disabilities? Will the service provider use accessible signage, audio and/or print materials? Will the service provider supply alternative formats, upon request? Will the service provider comply with the City’s Accessibility standards for administrative document); and
  • Facilities (Can someone using a mobility aid, such as a wheelchair or walker, get around the facility? Does signage have high contrast of at least 70% and is it placed at an accessible height? Does the facility have emergency procedures to assist people with disabilities?).

The City representative will ensure the scope of work section in bid solicitation documents includes requirements on accessibility design, criteria and features for the good, service and/or facility being purchased, where applicable.

Where bid solicitation documents do not include requirements on accessibility design, criteria and features, consider including accessibility in the bid solicitation evaluation process, where applicable. For example, a request for proposals document related to the design-build services for a splash pad will typically require the bidder (design-build team) to submit a layout plan to represent the proposed scope of work. Bidder ‘A’ includes asphalt ground surface for all walkways within the scope of the project and bidder ‘B’ includes asphalt ground surface for only one walkway. In this instance, both bidders are including accessibility into the project. However bidder ‘A’ is providing more accessibility, which benefits the overall project. Bidder ‘A’ is deserving of a higher accessibility rating than bidder ‘B’.

The City representative will ensure bid solicitation documents include information on accessibility training. Bid solicitation documents shall require successful bidders to submit, within 10 business days of notification of award, a completed “representation, warranty and acknowledgement regarding accessibility training” form with their signed contract.

The City representative will consult with the Accessibility Coordinator, when necessary, to obtain information on AODA requirements and resources to assist with determining what accessibility design, criteria and features should be incorporated.

The City representative will provide an explanation, upon request, if the City determines that it is not practicable to incorporate accessibility design, criteria and features into a purchase of a good, service and/or facility. As part of the explanation, consider what else can be done to provide the good, service and/or facility to people with disabilities as an alternate solution. The explanation must be provided in an accessible format or with appropriate communication supports.

The division manager and/or section supervisor will ensure that all City representatives providing goods services and/or facilities on behalf of their division or section are aware of this procedure.

The Accessibility Coordinator will assist City representatives in determining applicable AODA requirements when purchasing a good, service and/or facility, and assist City representatives in obtaining resources to assist them with determining what accessibility design, criteria and features should be incorporated.

Self-service kiosks

The City will incorporate accessibility features when designing, procuring or purchasing self-service kiosks such as, but not limited to, user controls, display screens, pin pads, card readers, scanners, instructions, etc.

Further information on accessible recommendations for self-service kiosk’s can be obtained from the Accessibility Coordinator.

IASR Transportation Procedure 

Purpose

This procedure implements, in part, the City’s Integrated Accessibility Standards Policy to ensure compliance with the applicable transportation standards of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation (IASR) made under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA).

This Procedure establishes guidelines to ensure the City’s conventional and Handi-van transportation services and vehicles are accessible to people with disabilities. The intent is to assist people with disabilities in being able to live, work and participate in the community.

Application

This Procedure applies to:

  • the City’s conventional and Handi-van transportation services and all those involved in the operation, maintenance, supervision, administration and/or oversight of the services;
  • modifications or upgrades to conventional transportation vehicles, owned by the City on or before June 30, 2011, that affect the technical requirements for conventional transportation vehicles outlined in this procedure, unless the modifications impair the structural integrity of the vehicle with respect to grab bars, handholds, handrails and stanchions; allocated mobility aid spaces; lighting features; and indicators and alarms;
  • conventional transportation vehicles owned by the City on or after July 1, 2011; and
  • future possible services offered by the Transit Section, such as streetcars, subways, light rail, commuter rail and inter-city rail. The Transit Section will be responsible to comply with the applicable requirements of the IAS as they relate to future possible services.

This Procedure does not apply to transportation vehicles regulated under Regulation 629 of the Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1990 (Vehicles for the Transportation of Physically Disabled Passengers) made under the Highway Traffic Act, with respect to the technical requirements for conventional transportation vehicles outlined in this procedure.

Procedure

Availability of information on accessibility equipment

(For conventional and Handi-van transportation services)

Transit staff will make current information on accessibility equipment and features of the transportation vehicles, routes and services available to the public. The information will be available on the City’s website and in an alternate accessible format, upon request.

Non-functioning accessibility equipment

(For conventional and Handi-van transportation services)

Transit Operators will:

  • complete daily circle-checks prior to start of service and report accessibility equipment defects to the on-duty Transit Operations Supervisor;
  • take reasonable steps to accommodate a person with a disability when the accessibility equipment on a transportation vehicle is not functioning and equivalent service cannot be provided; and
  • report vehicle malfunction or damage that happens during service to the on-duty Transit Operations Supervisor;

Transit staff will repair the accessibility equipment or arrange for a replacement vehicle as soon as practicable. There may be situations when it is not possible to arrange for a replacement vehicle, such as severe weather.

Accessibility training

Transit Operations Supervisors will ensure employees and volunteers in the Transit Section complete the City’s accessibility training modules, as appropriate to a person’s duties, in accordance with the City’s Integrated Accessibility Standards Policy. Training will include:

  • Accessibility Standards for Customer Service (mandatory);
  • IAS General Requirements (mandatory);
  • IAS Ontario’s Human Rights Code (mandatory);
  • IAS Employment Standards (mandatory);
  • IAS Transportation Standards (mandatory); and
  • IAS Procurement (mandatory for staff involved in purchasing).

Transit Operations Supervisors will conduct additional accessibility training to Transit staff on:

  • the safe use of Accessibility Equipment and features;
  • acceptable modifications to procedures in situations where temporary barriers exist or accessibility equipment on a transportation vehicle fails; and
  • emergency preparedness and response procedures that provide for the safety of a person with a disability, on both conventional and Handi-van transportation services.

Transit Operations Supervisors will keep a record of the training provided, including the dates on which the training is provided and the names of the staff in attendance.

Emergency preparedness and response policies

(For conventional and Handi-van transportation services)

The Transit Operations Manager will follow the corporate emergency plan and maintain the Transit Section’s standard operating procedures related to emergency preparedness and response, to provide for the safety of people with disabilities in the event of an emergency.

The Transit Section will ensure the corporate emergency plan and relevant standard operating procedures are available to the public, in an accessible format upon request.

Fares, support person

(For conventional and Handi-van transportation services)

The Transit Operations Manager will:

  • ensure no fare is charged for a support person who accompanies a person with a disability to help with communication, mobility, personal care or medical needs or with access to goods, services or facilities;
  • administer the Need for Support Person Application process that demonstrates the need for a support person to accompany a person with a disability and allows a person with a disability to obtain a Support Person Pass. The application process designates the person with a disability. It does not designate a support person; and
  • ensure no fee is charged for the Need for Support Person Application process.

A person with a disability who requires a support person will:

  • provide information as required in the Need for Support Person Application; and
  • present the support person pass that allows a support person to travel without paying a fare when using conventional and handi-Van transportation services. Additional people riding with the pass holder must pay a fare.

Accessibility plans

The Transit Operations Manager will monitor progress on the following goals outlined in the transportation section of the Accessibility Plan:

  • Identify the process for managing, evaluating and taking action on customer feedback;
  • Identify the process for estimating the demand for Handi-van transportation services;
  • Develop steps to reduce wait times for Handi-van transportation services; and
  • Describe the procedures for dealing with accessibility equipment failures on both conventional and Handi-van transportation services.

The Manager of Transportation will annually hold at least one public meeting involving people with disabilities to allow their participation in a review of the transportation section of the Accessibility Plan and to provide feedback on the plan.

General responsibilities

(For conventional transportation services)

Transit Operators will:

  • deploy lifting devices, ramps or portable bridge plates, upon request;
  • ensure that adequate time is provided to people with disabilities to safely board, be secured and de-board a transportation vehicle and provide assistance with these activities, upon request;
  • assist with safe and careful storage of mobility aids or mobility assistive devices used by people with disabilities; and
  • allow a person with a disability to travel with a medical aid.

Fares

(For conventional transportation services)

The Transit Section will not charge a higher fare to a person with a disability than the fare that is charged to a person without a disability.

More information on transportation fares can be found in the sections of this procedure related to:

  • Fares, support person;
  • Fare parity;
  • Companions and children; and
  • Taxicabs.

Transit Stops

(For conventional transportation services)

If a transit stop is not accessible or a temporary barrier exists, Transit Operators will:

  • ensure people with disabilities are able to board or de-board a transportation vehicle at the closest available safe location, as determined by the Transit Operator. The safe location will be along the same transit route and may not be an official transit stop;
  • communicate with and give consideration to the preference of a person with a disability when determining where a safe location may be situated; and
  • promptly report the barrier to the on-duty Transit Operations Supervisor.

Storage of mobility aids and mobility assistive devices

(For conventional transportation services)

Transit Operators will:

  • ensure a mobility aid and mobility assistive device is stored in the passenger compartment of the transportation vehicle within reach of the person with the disability who uses it, if safe storage is possible; and
  • not charge a fee for the storage of a mobility aid or a mobility assistive device.

Priority seating

(For conventional transportation services)

Transit Operations Supervisors will:

  • ensure there is clearly marked priority seating for people with disabilities;
  • post signage at the priority seating to indicate that a passenger, other than a person with a disability, must vacate the priority seating if it is required by a person with a disability; and
  • locate the priority seating for people with disabilities as close as practicable to an entrance door of the transportation vehicle.

Transit Operators are not required to intervene to enforce priority seating. The Manager of Transportation will continue to educate the public about the purpose of priority seating. The information will be communicated in an accessible format and with appropriate communication supports.

Courtesy seating

(For conventional transportation services)

Transit Operations Supervisors will ensure there is a clearly marked courtesy seating area for people in need, including but not limited to parents with strollers or young children, seniors, and pregnant women. Transit Operators are not required to intervene to enforce courtesy seating. The Manager of Transportation will continue to educate the public about the purpose of courtesy seating. The information will be communicated in an accessible format and with appropriate communication supports.

Service disruptions

(For conventional transportation services)

Where a route or scheduled service is temporarily changed and the change is known in advance, the Transit Operations Manager will:

  • make an alternative accessible arrangement to transfer a person with a disability to their route destination; and
  • ensure information on the alternative arrangement is communicated in a manner that takes into account the person’s disability.

Pre-boarding announcements

(For conventional transportation services)

To make information about the route, direction, destination or next major stop available to people with disabilities before they board a transportation vehicle, the Manager of Transportation will ensure there are electronic pre-boarding announcements of the route, direction, destination or next major stop, by January 1, 2017. The electronic pre-boarding announcements will meet the requirements for signage outlined in this procedure.

Transit Operators will provide verbal pre-boarding announcements of the route, direction, destination or next major stop, upon request, unless transportation vehicles are equipped with electronic pre-boarding announcements.

On-board announcements

(For conventional transportation services)

To make information about the destination points or stops along a route available to people with disabilities, Transit Operations Supervisors will ensure there are automated electronic announcement and visual display systems on transportation vehicles. The announcements will be clear and easy to hear. The visual displays will be legible and meet the technical requirements for signage outlined in this procedure. This applies to all destination points or available transit stops while the vehicle is operating and on route.

Technical requirements for conventional transportation vehicles

For conventional transportation vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013, the Manager of Transportation will ensure the vehicle meets the technical requirements for grab bars, handholds, handrails and stanchions. Unless the installation impairs the vehicle’s structural integrity, grab bars, handholds, handrails and stanchions will:

  • be installed on transportation vehicles where appropriate, such as the location where a passenger pays a fare, each mobility aid securement position, each priority seating area, and each side of any entrance or exit used by a person with a disability;
  • be located at an entrance or exit accessible from ground level and mounted to be inside the vehicle when the transportation vehicle doors are closed;
  • be distributed throughout the vehicle to support independent and safe boarding, on-board circulation, and assist with seating, standing and de-boarding;
  • accommodate turning and maneuvering space required for mobility aids;
  • have high colour-contrast with the background surface;
  • be fabricated to be sturdy, rounded and free of any sharp or abrasive element;
  • have an exterior diameter that permits easy grasping;
  • have sufficient clearance from the surface to which it is attached;
  • be designed to prevent catching or snagging of clothes or personal items;
  • have a slip resistant surface;
  • return to a wall or floor in a smooth curve, where applicable; and
  • include brackets, clamps, screw heads, etc. that are rounded or flush with the surface and free from burrs or rough edges.

For conventional transportation vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013, the Manager of Transportation will ensure the vehicle meets the technical requirements for floors and carpeted surfaces. Floors and carpeted surfaces will:

  • produce minimal glare;
  • be slip resistant;
  • have a low, firm and level pile or loop; and
  • be securely fastened.

For conventional transportation vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013, the Manager of Transportation will ensure the vehicle meets the technical requirements for allocated mobility aid spaces. Unless the installation impairs the vehicle’s structural integrity, transportation vehicles will have two or more mobility aid spaces equipped with securement devices as appropriate. Each space will be a minimum of:

  • 1,220 millimetres by 685 millimetres for transportation vehicles designed to have a seating capacity of 24 passengers or less; and
  • 1,220 millimetres by 760 millimetres for transportation vehicles designed to have a seating capacity of more than 24 passengers.

Ensure the mobility aid spaces may be used for other passenger purposes, if not required for a person who uses a mobility aid.

For conventional transportation vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013, the Manager of Transportation will ensure the vehicle meets the technical requirements for stop requests and emergency response controls. To make controls on transportation vehicles accessible for people with disabilities, stop requests and emergency response controls will:

  • be located throughout the transportation vehicle, including places within reach of allocated mobility aid spaces, priority and courtesy seating locations;
  • provide auditory and visual indications that a request has been made;
  • be mounted no higher than 1,220 millimetres and no lower than 380 millimetres above the floor;
  • be operable with one hand and not require tight grasping, pinching or twisting of the wrist;
  • have high colour-contrast with the surface to which the control is mounted; and
  • have tactile information, if designed to be an emergency response control.

Both stop requests and emergency response controls are not required in all vehicles. Stop request features apply to buses and future possible street cars. Emergency response controls apply to future possible subways, light rail, commuter rail and inter-city rail.

For conventional transportation vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013, the Manager of Transportation will ensure the vehicle meets the technical requirements for lighting features. Unless the installation impairs the vehicle’s structural integrity, lighting features will be installed above or beside each passenger access door. When the door is open, the lighting will:

  • be constantly lit;
  • illuminate the lifting device, ramp, portable bridge plate or step nosings;
  • illuminate the ground surface for a distance of at least 0.9 metres perpendicular to the bottom step tread or outer edge of the lift; and
  • be shielded to protect the eyes of passengers entering and exiting the transportation vehicle.

For conventional transportation vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013, the Manager of Transportation will ensure the vehicle meets the technical requirements for signage. Signage will display the route, direction, destination or next major stop and have:

  • consistent shape, colour and position in all transportation vehicles;
  • text that is high colour-contrasted with its background, to assist with visual recognition; and
  • text that has the appearance of solid characters.

The route, direction, destination or next major stop signage may include pictograms or symbols that will:

  • be visible at the boarding point;
  • be consistently located;
  • have a glare-free surface; and
  • be positioned to avoid shadow areas and glare.

For conventional transportation vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013, the Manager of Transportation will ensure the vehicle meets the technical requirements for lifting devices, ramps, or portable bridge plates. To help people board and de-board the vehicles, these features will:

  • have a colour strip that runs the full width, marking the bottom edge of the feature. The colour strip will have high colour-contrast with its background to assist with visual recognition;
  • have a slip resistant platform surface; and
  • have raised edges of sufficient height to prevent a mobility aid from rolling off the edge of the ramp during the boarding or de-boarding of passengers.

For conventional transportation vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013, the Manager of Transportation will ensure the vehicle meets the technical requirements for steps. To ensure consistent accessibility and safety features, steps on vehicles will:

  • be marked with colour strips at the top outer edge of each step, that is high colour-contrasted with its background to assist with visual recognition. The colour strip will run the full width of the leading edge of the step, excluding any side edge mouldings. The colour strip will be viewed when passengers are walking up the steps to board the vehicle and down the steps to de-board;
  • have surfaces that are slip resistant and produce minimal glare; and
  • have uniform, closed riser heights and tread depths, subject to the structural limitations of the vehicle.

For conventional transportation vehicles manufactured on or after January 1, 2013, the Manager of Transportation will ensure the vehicle meets the technical requirements for indicators and alarms. Unless the installation impairs the vehicle’s structural integrity, transportation vehicles with a ramp, lifting device or kneeling function will be equipped with a visual warning lamp indicator mounted on the exterior of the vehicle, near the mobility aid accessible door. The feature will also have an audible warning alarm.

The indicator and audible warning alarm will operate when the ramp, lifting device or kneeling function is in motion. If a ramp or lifting device is being manually operated, no warning lamp indicator or audible warning alarm is required.

Handi-van eligibility categories

The Transit Section will have three categories of eligibility to qualify for Handi-van transportation services, including:

  • Conditional eligibility (applies to a person with a disability that prevents them from using conventional transportation service due to physical or environmental barriers);
  • Temporary eligibility (applies to a person with a temporary disability that prevents them from using conventional transportation service); and
  • Unconditional eligibility (applies to a person with a disability that prevents them from using conventional transportation service that is not categorized as conditional or temporary).

The Transit Operations Manager may deny a request for Handi-van transportation service to a person under the conditional or temporary eligibility categories if conventional transportation service is accessible to the person and they are able to use it.

Handi-van eligibility application process

To standardize the Handi-van application and appeal process for people with disabilities, the Transit Operations Manager will:

  • administer the Handi-van eligibility and appeal application process that demonstrates the need for Handi-van transportation service for a person with a disability;
  • grant temporary Handi-van eligibility status to an applicant when the person’s eligibility has not been determined within 14 calendar days after receipt of the Handi-van eligibility application. This status will remain in effect until an eligibility decision is made by the City;
  • reassess the Handi-van eligibility of a person who has been granted temporary eligibility, at reasonable intervals;
  • administer an appeal with respect to Handi-van eligibility within 30 calendar days after receiving a complete appeal application. If a final decision is not made within 30 calendar days, the applicant will be granted temporary Handi-van eligibility until a final decision is made; and
  • provide the Handi-van eligibility application and decision information in an accessible format, upon request.

The Transit Section will:

  • not charge an application or assessment fee for a person with a disability who applies to use the Handi-van transportation service;
  • refer appeal applications to the City’s Accessibility Office to make an eligibility decision. The Accessibility Office will manage the City’s independent appeal process; and
  • manage the collection, use and disclosure of personal information collected for the purposes of determining eligibility, in compliance with the Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

Emergency or compassionate grounds

(For Handi-van transportation services)

The Transit Operations Manager will grant temporary eligibility status to a person with a disability who needs temporary Handi-van transportation services earlier than 14 calendar days allowed for in the eligibility application process. This will be considered when the service is required because of an emergency or on compassionate grounds and when there are no other accessible transportation services to meet the person’s needs.

Fare parity

(For Handi-van transportation services)

The Transit Section will:

  • apply the same fare structure to conventional and Handi-van transportation services; and
  • make available the same fare payment options for conventional and Handi-van transportation services, but alternative options will be made available to a person with a disability who can’t use a fare payment option because of their disability.

Visitors

(For Handi-van transportation services)

A visitor is a person who is not a resident of the City of Peterborough. The Transit Section will make Handi-van transportation services available to visitors and consider visitors as eligible when they:

  • provide confirmation that they are eligible for specialized service in the jurisdiction in which they reside; or
  • meet Transit Section’s Handi-van transportation service eligibility requirements.

The duration of eligibility for visitors may be restricted depending on operational demand.

Origin to destination service

(For Handi-van transportation services)

Origin to destination service refers to a service that enables a person with a disability to travel from their starting point to their destination point by using a package of transportation services. The service may include a combination of Handi-van and conventional transportation services that are accessible. The Transit Section will provide origin to destination service that takes into account the abilities of a person with a disability.

Hours of service

(For Handi-van transportation services)

The Manager of Transportation will ensure the Handi-van transportation service has at a minimum, the same hours and days of service as the conventional transportation service.

Bookings

(For Handi-Van transportation services)

The Transit Section will:

  • provide same day Handi-van transportation service to the extent it is available;
  • where same day Handi-Van transportation service is not available, accept booking requests up to three hours before the published end of the service period on the day before the intended day of travel. The service period refers to the hours of the day during which transportation services are offered, not the general office hours; and
  • provide accessible means to accept reservations.

Trip restrictions / availability of service

(For Handi-van transportation services)

The Transit Section will not limit the availability of the Handi-van transportation service to a person with a disability by:

  • restricting the number of trips a person is able to request. Multiple and repetitive bookings are permitted, to the extent the Handi-van transportation service is available; and
  • implementing any policy or operational practice that unreasonably limits the availability of the Handi-van transportation service.

Service delays

(For Handi-van transportation services)

Transit Operations Supervisors will provide information on the duration of a service delay to affected passengers of the Handi-van transportation service by a method agreed to by a Transit Operations Supervisor and passenger. A service delay is a delay of 30 minutes or more from the scheduled pick-up time. This does not apply to a delay in service that will arise during the trip.

Companions and children

(For Handi-van transportation services)

Transit Operators will:

  • allow companions to travel with a person who is eligible for Handi-van transportation services if space is available and it will not result in the denial of service to another person who is eligible for the service. The companion will pay the fare that is required if they were using the conventional transportation service; and
  • allow dependants to travel with a person who is eligible for Handi-van transportation services if appropriate child restraint securement systems and equipment are available, if required. The person who is eligible for Handi-van transportation services must be the parent or guardian of the dependant travelling with them.

Companions may include the spouses, partners or friends of the eligible people with disabilities. A support person is not considered a companion.

Bus stops and shelters

(For conventional transportation services)

The Transit Operations Manager will:

  • consult with the Accessibility Advisory Committee, the public and people with disabilities about design criteria for the construction, renovation or replacement of bus stops and shelters;
  • identify the planning for accessible bus stops and shelters in the transportation section of the Accessibility Plan; and
  • ensure the person(s) responsible for the construction of the accessible bus stops and shelters participate in the consultation and planning process.

Accessible taxicabs

The City, through the Peterborough Lakefield Community Police Service will:

  • consult with the Accessibility Advisory Committee, the public and people with disabilities to determine the proportion of on-demand accessible taxicabs required in the community; and
  • identify progress made toward meeting the need for on-demand accessible taxicabs, including any steps to be taken to meet the need, in the transportation section of the Accessibility Plan.

Taxicabs

The City, through the Peterborough Lakefield Community Police Service will ensure that owners and operators of taxicabs:

  • are prohibited from charging a higher fare or an additional fee for a person with a disability than for a person without a disability for the same trip;
  • are prohibited from charging a fee for the storage of mobility aids or mobility assistive devices;
  • place vehicle registration and identification information on the rear bumper of the taxicab and meet the requirements for signage as outlined in this procedure; and
  • make available vehicle registration and identification information in an accessible format to a person with a disability who is a passenger.