Council overview package for February 18, 2020

full bike rack

City Hall, winter, snow on ground and roof

City Council will consider the following items at its meeting starting at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, February 18, 2020 in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 500 George St. N.:

Council endorsed the recommendations at its General Committee meetings on February 3 and February 10, 2020. At the regular Council session on February 18, 2020, it will consider giving final approval to those decisions.

City Council meeting agenda

Council meetings are live streamed online at peterborough.ca/watchcouncil.

Watch Council

Presentation on health-related questions associated with uranium processing

At the General Committee meeting on February 10, 2020, Medical Officer of Health Dr. Rosana Salvaterra presented to Council on health-related questions associated with uranium processing.

Council requested the presentation from the medical officer of health when it was considering a motion to send a letter to the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) and Peterborough-Kawartha MP Maryam Monsef about BWXT's application to the CNSC to allow it to add uranium pelleting to its facility in Peterborough.

Council endorsed sending the letter to CNSC to support the Medical Officer of Health's recommendations:

  • that BWXT implement a comprehensive environmental monitoring program to provide sufficient data to assess the full extent of uranium and beryllium emissions in the surrounding area prior to any decision regarding renewal of licence and the addition of pelleting at the Peterborough site;
  • that the BWXT Peterborough facility retain the services of an independent, neutral third party for soil, water, and air testing for uranium and beryllium, as appropriate, and publicly share all reports and test results in their entirety; and
  • that the BWXT Peterborough facility establish a Community Liaison Committee in Peterborough, similar to its Community Liaison Committee in Toronto.

Council would also ask that the Medical Officer of Health review the data once the conditions outlined in her intervention letter to CNSC are satisfied and report back to Peterborough Public Health.

Peterborough Public Health has posted health-related information about uranium and the BWXT application on its website.

Investing proceeds of PDI sale

Council heard presentations from City of Peterborough Holdings Inc. and ONE Investment on options for investing the proceeds of the sale of Peterborough Distribution Inc. (PDI).

City of Peterborough Holdings Inc. presentation

ONE Investment presentation

The negotiated sale price of Peterborough Distribution Inc. to Hydro One is $105 million. After fees and retirement of debt obligations, the net sale proceeds are expected to be in the range of $50 to $55 million.

Investing the money from Hydro One's purchase of PDI would provide an ongoing source of non-tax revenue for the long-term benefit of the community. To start the discussion on how to invest the proceeds of the sale of PDI, the City has asked for two potential investment options to present to Council and it is asking the community for other ideas. Investing in renewable energy through City of Peterborough Holdings Inc. and ONE Investment to create a Legacy Fund are two ideas being considered - but Council could also consider other ideas on how to use the money.

The City will consult with the community through drop-in sessions, a survey, and online engagement at connectptbo.ca as part of the review on how to invest the proceeds from the sale of PDI.

Citizen appointments

Council will consider appointing Kady Denton to the Arts, Culture and Heritage Advisory Committee for a term ending November 2022.

Denton graduated from the University of Toronto with an honours degree in Fine Arts and a post-graduate degree in Urban and Regional Planning. She works as an illustrator/author of books for children.

At its meeting on February 10, 2020, Council endorsed deferring a recommendation to appoint Emily Hunt to the Peterborough Housing Corporation Board of Directors.

Doctor recruitment agreement

Council will consider renewing an agreement with the County of Peterborough and the Peterborough Family Health Team for physician recruitment activities for the Peterborough area.

The city and county were deemed in March 2017 to be underserviced or in high need for physicians. Peterborough Family Health Team continues its efforts efforts to recruit and add as many doctors as needed with the ultimate goal of all people having access to a primary care provider.

An analysis of current and projected needs in the community and surrounding area over the next ten years indicates a need for 43 new physicians, as follows:

  • 3 full-time to care for current unattached
  • 25 full-time to care for retiring physician’s practices
  • 15 full-time to care for population growth (14,000 – low estimate)

Emergency shelter and homelessness support services

Council will consider one-year agreement extensions with YES Shelter for Youth and Families, Brock Mission, and Four Counties Addictions Services for emergency shelter and homelessness support services.

Emergency shelter funding would increase to $1.65 million in 2020 from the previously budgeted amount of $1.54 million. Out of that allotment, the funding for YES Shelter for Youth and Families would increase to $592,900 from $512,700 and the funding for Brock Mission, which operates the Brock shelter for men and the Cameron House shelter for women, would increase to $1.06 million from $1.03 million.

The Emergency Shelter System continues to experience high volumes. Retention of staff for this difficult work is becoming a risk to shelter operations. The funding is based upon the historic expectation that as the main funder, the City would limit its funding to 85% of their overall costs.

Homelessness continues to be a serious issue, however, community service providers, working closely with the City, have been building coordinated responses and achieving success.

In 2019, at least 275 persons or an average of 23 people per month moved from homelessness to housing with the support of the Homelessness Service System and other community partners. 28% of these people were chronically homeless, representing some of the most vulnerable people in the community.

 Shelter usage statistics
Brock Mission men's emergency shelter usage (40 beds)
YearNumber of bed nights usedAverage occupancy
2014 11,733 80%
2015 12,368 85%
2016 11,210 78%
2017 13,011 89%
2018 14,049 96%
2019 14,319 98%
Cameron House women's emergency shelter usage (10 beds)
YearNumber of bed nights usedAverage occupancy
2014 2,748 75%
2015 3,461 95%
2016 3,461 95%
2017 3,605 99%
2018 3,793 104%
2019 3,692 101%
YES Shelter for Youth and Families usage (30 beds)
YearNumber of bed nights usedAverage occupancy
2014 7,673 70%
2015 7,205 66%
2016 9,136 83%
2017 8,453 77%
2018 7,821 72%
2019 8,702 79%

In November 2018, Peterborough joined the Built for Zero Canada Campaign, along with over 30 communities across Canada. The goal is to end chronic homelessness, which is the first step in ending all forms of homelessness. The method used to end homelessness is a Coordinated Access System and the use of a By Name Priority List.

Upon analysis of all homelessness related programs and spending, the increase in shelter services costs can be covered through the existing homelessness budget through a reduction in funding for the Housing Stability Fund. With the tight rental market being experienced in Peterborough, less funds are required for first and last months rent as fewer households are choosing to move. Furthermore, this is a newer program and staff now have multiple years of usage data to be able to better predict usage and funds can be better used towards emergency shelters at this time.

Council has asked City staff to monitor the budget for available housing stability funds and report to Council as necessary to ensure that program has enough funding.

Wastewater treatment plant project

Wastewater treatment plant

Council will consider creating a $3.56-million project budget for the replacement of containment structures that are used in the treatment process at the Wastewater Treatment Plant.

With the failure of one of the containment structures in 2018, the facility has been operating below its approved capacity. The remaining containment cages and structures are reaching the end of life.

The City would use $2.2 million from the provincial government's Ontario Community Infrastructure Fund allocation to the City and $902,069 from the City's Wastewater Reserve Fund. It would also apply for $417,277 from the federal government's Investing in Canada Infrastructure - Green Stream program.

Rotary Greenway Trail connection improvements

Map of trail connection locations

Council will consider creating a $150,000 project budget for improving Rotary Greenway Trail connections.

The City would use $120,000 from the Tollington Parks Endowment Fund to support the work. The Tollington Parks Endowment Fund was established in 1996 by Gordon Tollington, a citizen of Peterborough, to provide financial resources to improve public parkland.

The work would include improvements at three connections to the Rotary Greenway Trail at Frances Stewart Road, Moir Street and Vinette Street. These trail connections will improve accessibility to the trails. Currently, informal pathways exist that are often muddy or blocked by snowbanks and in one case, a gate. The Rotary Greenway Trail is an important corridor for active transportation and recreation.

The contract would be tendered in March 2020 with construction taking place in the summer of 2020.

Peterborough and the Kawarthas Economic Development update

Aerial view of employment park

Peterborough and the Kawarthas Economic Development provided an update to Council on the regional economic development agency's activities.

Some highlights from 2019:

  • More than 923 new jobs created in the Peterborough region from December 2018 to December 2019
  • Through the Business Advisory Centre, assisted entrepreneurs with starting up 44 businesses that created 53 jobs
  • The Business Advisory Centre helped clients access almost $1.3 million in funding support
  • Visited 58 businesses in support of business retention and expansion
  • Assisted 128 unique businesses plus 37 repeat businesses with business retention and expansion activities

Peterborough and the Kawarthas Economic Development

Municipal Parks and Open Space Study

Playground structure covered in snow with trees behind

Council will consider adopting in principle a study on parks and open spaces as well as a document on park development standards that the City would use when it's developing policies and setting priorities related to the development of municipal parks and open space.

Executive summary - Assessment of parks and open spaces

Staff report

Peterborough has an above norm amount of public and publicly available open space, although a good deal of the land is natural heritage in nature, the consultants state in the report. There is a good and improving network of linked open spaces and trails as well as many quality regional and community parks.

The consultants state that the City should increase the amount of neighbourhood parkland.

The assessment of the existing parks and open spaces was used to come up with recommendations on how to improve access to and quality of the City's existing and future parkland.

The review identified the following parks as the 10 highest priority parks for rejuvenation:

  • Cameron Street tot lot
  • Earlwood
  • Keith Wightman
  • Dominion
  • Hamilton
  • Glenn Pagett
  • Whitefield
  • Dainard
  • Denne
  • Queen Alexandra (plus Nicholls Place pocket park)

Canadian General Electric smokestack demolition

Council will consider a recommendation from the Peterborough Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee that the smokestack at the former Canadian General Electric factory at 107 Park St. N. be approved for demolition.

In 2018, Council approved putting the property as a listed property on the City's Heritage Register. Owners of properties listed on the Heritage Register must give Council at least 60 days notice if they plan to demolish or remove a building or structure on the properties - and the municipal heritage committee, which in Peterborough is known as the Peterborough Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee, must be consulted. The process gives Council the ability to decide whether the property should be moved to a heritage designation status, which could prevent the demolition of heritage features.

Peterborough Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee reviewed the demolition proposal for 107 Park St. N. and does not feel that the smokestack is historically significant.

Community Wellbeing Plan

Graphic of City, cover of Community Wellbeing Plan document

Council will consider a report on the Community Wellbeing Plan, which would be used by Council when it's establishing priorities to improve the quality of life for all residents.

The Community Wellbeing Plan identifies themes to help local government, organizations, agencies and residents work towards the goals, including:

  • Environmental stewardship
  • Democratic and community engagement
  • Good jobs
  • Healthy community
  • Housing
  • Income and poverty
  • Transportation

Community members participated in the development of the Community Wellbeing Plan through various events and meetings including pop-up displays at community events and facilities, presentations to various organizations and groups, a survey, and workshops.

Under each theme, the participants provided ideas on how to achieve the goals.

Proposed telecommunication structure - 1562 Sherbrooke St.

Map of location for telecommunication tower at 1562 Sherbrooke Street

Council will consider sending a letter to Innovation Science and Economic Development Canada about the proposed telecommunication structure that would be built at 1562 Sherbrooke St.

Council would inform Innovation Science and Economic Development Canada that the proposal has been subject to the City of Peterborough's Telecommunications Structures Policy and Procedure and that the proposal has generated some concerns, which the applicant has addressed.

The communications tower would be a 50-metre tall monopole.

While the federal government is the approval authority for telecommunication structure installations, the City has a policy and procedure related to public consultation for the location and design of telecommunication structures.

Proposed telecommunication structure - 1040 Lansdowne St. W.

Map of location for telecommunication tower at 1040 Lansdowne Street West

Council will consider sending a letter to Innovation Science and Economic Development Canada about the proposed telecommunication structure that would be built at 1040 Lansdowne St. W.

Council would inform Innovation Science and Economic Development Canada that the proposal has been subject to the City of Peterborough's Telecommunications Structures Policy and Procedure and that the proposal has generated some concerns, which the applicant has addressed.

The communications tower would be a 30-metre tall monopole.

While the federal government is the approval authority for telecommunication structure installations, the City has a policy and procedure related to public consultation for the location and design of telecommunication structures.

Plan to review waste management options for the future

Landfill with equipment working

A report for information outlining plans to review the City's waste management options for the future, including a comprehensive review of the landfill that has an estimated 15 years of use remaining, will be considered by Council.

Over the next five years, there will be significant work undertaken that will influence the lifespan of the landfill and future direction for solid waste management:

  • 2020 - A comprehensive review of the Waste Management Master Plan that will provide the framework for the City/County's existing and evolving waste management programs;
  • 2019-2023 - Implementation of a city-wide household organic waste collection program and processing facility; and
  • 2024-2025 - A comprehensive review of the future of the City/County landfill as well as new and emerging technologies related to landfill as part of the landfill Environmental Assessment process.