City Council overview package June 3, 2019

full bike rack

City Hall at night

City Council, sitting as General Committee, endorsed the following items at its meeting in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 500 George St. N. on Monday, June 3, 2019:

  • A presentation on the Peterborough Police Service Facility Space Needs Study with recommendations that the presentation be received for information and that the report be sent back to a committee that's overseeing the process to review the five options and develop recommendations on next steps;
  • A presentation on the launch of the Watershed Planning Study that will serve as a basis for identifying and protecting water resources and to inform land use, infrastructure planning and decision making;
  • A notice that a public meeting will be held on June 24, 2019 at 5:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers for a presentation on the Development Charges Background Study by Peterborough Utilities Commission and for public delegations on that presentation with the recommended rate changes scheduled to go to a General Committee meeting on July 8, 2019;
  • Keeping 714 Cumberland Ave., 493 Bethune St. and 546 Aylmer St. as listed properties on the City's Heritage Register;
  • Designating Riverside Park at 325 Burnham St. as being a property of cultural heritage value or interest to the City of Peterborough under the Ontario Heritage Act;
  • Designating 27 Charles St., 239 Burnham St., 181 Stewart St. and 212 McDonnel St. as being properties of cultural heritage value or interest to the City of Peterborough under the Ontario Heritage Act;
  • Updating the City of Peterborough's Ice Allocation Policy that provides a framework for the equitable, reasonable and fair distribution of prime time ice to all user groups in the community;
  • Acquiring an easement over part of 477 Bethune St. for a trunk sanitary sewer crossing at Jackson Creek as part of the Bethune Street project;
  • Asking staff to report back to Council on designating Jackson Park as a cultural heritage landscape; and
  • Asking staff to report back to Council on the progress of the Official Plan Review.

Council will also be holding a closed-session meeting starting at 5:45 p.m. in the Doris Room to consider a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land on Ashdale Crescent, under Section 239(2)(c) of the Municipal Act.

Peterborough Police Service Facility Space Needs Study

Council endorsed receiving for information a presentation on the Peterborough Police Service Facility Space Needs Study that's looking at the existing police station and the future needs of the police service.

At this point, staff are recommending through the report that Council receive the presentation for information and send it back to the committee that's guiding the process to look at the five options that have emerged from the study and develop recommendations for Council on the next steps.

The review found the following deficiencies with the current site and building:

  • Existing site is insufficient to accommodate an expanded station and all parking requirements
  • High-risk building - the building does not meet current security standards
  • No separation of public and private/secure access
  • Storm water management issues
  • The structure and building systems are not designed to Post Disaster requirements
  • The building is not fully sprinklered
  • The building envelope contains lower insulation levels compared to current requirements
  • The mechanical and electrical systems are at capacity and have poor control
  • Poor/inadequate ventilation in some areas
  • Inadequate separation of public/semi-private and private spaces
  • Inadequate forensic lab facilities
  • Poor spatial organization and lack of support spaces
  • Poor interviewing facilities
  • Inadequate staff facilities
  • Lack of training facilities
  • The building and site are not accessible
  • Forensic labs ventilation and plumbing are not to current design practices
  • Detention areas are undersized and outdated
  • Cell doors are older type bars that are no longer used in current design practices for safety
  • Property and evidence secure storage room must be accessed to shut off water lines in cells

The police station was built in 1968 when the service had 85 staff. The original portion of the building had 1,820 square metres of space. A second floor was added with 930 square metres of space in 1985 to expand the capacity of the facility to 133 staff and to meet the needs of the service for 10 years. A 270-square-metre expansion was built in 2009 along with the addition of property to the east for parking. In 2011, a report to the Police Services Board indicated the station was "beyond capacity." In 2015, with the expansion of the service to provide policing to Cavan Monaghan, the service reached a complement of 191 staff.

The current police station has about 3,000 square metres of space. The Space Needs Study recommends planning for a facility with about 8,825 square metres of space.

Options evaluated by the consultant

Photo Gallery: Police Facility Space Needs Study will appear here on the public site.

The consultant evaluated the options based on building functionality, site functionality, construction cost, mitigation of service disruption, expansion potential, project duration, associated costs and civic presence to score each option out of 100.

Addition and renovation on the existing site

  • $50,235,130 estimate
  • The site is too small to accommodate the requirements and the work would interrupt service continuity
  • Evaluation score: 49

New station on the existing site

  • $51,190,885 estimate
  • The site is too small to accommodate the requirements and the work would interrupt service continuity
  • Evaluation score: 54

New station on a generic site

  • $46,991,550 estimate
  • This is the preferred option
  • Evaluation score: 92 to 94.5

New station as an addition and renovation to another building

  • $39,051,310 estimate
  • This is a viable option
  • Evaluation score: 83 to 85.5

Phased new construction on a generic site

  • $46,991,550 estimate
  • This is also a viable option, provides the opportunity to spread out the financing
  • Evaluation score: 87 to 89.5

Watershed Planning Study Project initiation and presentation

Peterborough area watersheds

Council endorsed receiving for information a presentation on the Watershed Planning Study.

Watershed planning will serve as a basis for identifying and protecting the water resource system and to inform land use, infrastructure planning and decision making.

The watershed planning process involves preparing background information to characterize the watersheds, drafting a vision, including goals and objectives that are guided by science, engagement and consultation, conducting technical studies related to water quantity and water budgets, water quality assessments, natural hazards, climate change, natural systems, cumulative effects, and preparing land-use and management scenarios. 

Throughout the watershed planning process, the City will employ a significant level of community and stakeholder participation.

Notice of public meeting for the Peterborough Utilities Commission Development Charge Background Study

Council endorsed receiving a report advising it that a public meeting will be held on June 24, 2019 starting at 5:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers at City Hall to present the Peterborough Utilities Commission Development Charge Background Study and to hear public delegations.

After the public meeting, a report would go to Council's General Committee meeting on July 8, 2019 for it to consider Peterborough Utilities Commission Development Charge rate changes.

Development Charges are fees associated with development, such as the construction of new homes and commercial buildings, to pay for growth-related capital works.

Peterborough Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee opinion on removing properties from City's Heritage Register

Photo Gallery: Heritage register June 3 2019 will appear here on the public site.

Council endorsed receiving a report advising Council that the Peterborough Architectural Advisory Committee recommends that the City not remove 714 Cumberland Ave., 493 Bethune St. and 546 Aylmer St. as listed properties on the City's Heritage Register.

Council is not supporting the removal of the properties from the Heritage Register.

Council had asked for the advisory committee's opinion on the possibility of removing those properties from the list after the property owners had requested the removals through Council members.

Heritage designation for Riverside Park cultural heritage landscape

Park with baseball diamond and a bridge and old industrial factory in background

Council endorsed designating Riverside Park, at 325 Burnham St., as a cultural heritage landscape being of cultural heritage value or interest under the Ontario Heritage Act.

Peterborough Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee is recommending that Council approve the designation.

Staff determined that the area is suitable for designation as a cultural heritage landscape because of the significance of the wider landscape as a whole, including elements such as the views, natural features, and the Hunter Street Bridge, and the fact that activities, both historic and contemporary, that take place within the park are integral to its meaning and significance to the community. It is a good example of an evolved landscape because its evolution over time, which began with the establishment of sports field in this location in the nineteenth century, has continued throughout the twentieth century as the facility developed to fit the needs of the community with regard to organized sport and recreational space.

It would be Peterborough's first designated property explicitly recognized as a cultural heritage landscape.

Designation of heritage properties - 27 Charles St., 239 Burnham St., 181 Stewart St. and 212 McDonnel St.

Photo Gallery: Heritage Register p2 June 3 2019 will appear here on the public site.

Council endorsed designating 27 Charles St., 239 Burnham St., 181 Stewart St. and 212 McDonnel St. as heritage properties being of cultural heritage value or interest under the Ontario Heritage Act.

Built in 1861, the house at 27 Charles St. has cultural heritage value as representative example of a mid-nineteenth century residential property constructed in the Gothic Revival style. The property has historical significance in its connection to a number of prominent local figures who occupied the house in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Its first occupants were Henry T. Strickland – a local businessman and son of Colonel Samuel Strickland of Lakefield – and his wife, Margaret Rogers, the niece of prominent Ashburnham businessman Robert D. Rogers.

Built in 1866, the house at 239 Burnham St., or Bellevue, has cultural heritage value as an excellent example of a mid-nineteenth century Italianate villa in Peterborough. The property has historical and associative value through its first owners, John Burnham and his wife, Maria Rogers. John Burnham was the son of the Rev. Mark Burnham, the rector of St. John’s Anglican Church and a significant landholder in Ashburnham. The younger Burnham studied for the bar under Judge Charles A. Weller and began to practice law in Peterborough in 1865. He was a prominent figure in local affairs, serving as the Reeve of Ashburnham, County Warden and Conservative Member of Parliament for Peterborough East. He also served as the captain of the local militia, the 57th Regiment. His wife, Maria McGregor Rogers, was the daughter of local businessman Robert D. Rogers and older sister of Richard Birdsall Rogers, the designer of the Peterborough Lift Lock.

Built in 1901, the house at 181 Stewart St. has cultural heritage value as a typical example of a simplified Queen Anne style house. The property has historical and associative value as an example of the kind of property occupied by the workers of Peterborough’s increasing industrial base during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Built around 1895, the house at 212 McDonnel St. has cultural heritage value as a representative example of a late Victorian residential building. Historically, the property has important connections with J.W. Miller, the occupant of the house between 1912 and 1938. Miller was one of Peterborough’s most prominent military men in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and a key figure in the development of the city’s military presence. Miller was one of the last surviving Canadian veterans of the American Civil War, where he fought at key battles including Gettysburg and Antietam, and of the Fenian Raids. He was instrumental in the development of the Peterborough militia throughout the second half of the nineteenth century.

Arena Division Ice Allocation Policy

Youth skating on an ice pad at the Evinrude CentreCouncil endorsed a recommended new Ice Allocation Policy that sets the framework for the City to provide for the equitable, reasonable and fair distribution of prime time ice to all user groups in the community.

Research on the Ice Allocation Policy showed a shift in philosophy taking place in communities across Canada where allocation practices based on "historical patterns" are shifting to policies based on "fair and equitable distribution" that accounts for gender equity, access for youth and accommodates newer and emerging ice sports and arena users.

As part of the development of the policy, City staff consulted with user groups and worked closely with the three main minor hockey organizations.

A new allocation formula introduced in the 2016-17 fall/winter season is based on membership numbers, levels of play and number of teams.

Major shifts in the ice allocation process began to address inequities in ice allocation, replacing the previous practice of "grandfathering" and "first right of refusal".

The practice of holding open user group sessions on an annual basis with all groups began in 2015 with the intent to open new lines of communication between and among user groups and City staff.

Easement for a trunk sanitary sewer

Council endorsed a recommendation that the City acquire an easement over part of 477 Bethune St. to allow the City to extend a trunk sanitary sewer crossing at Jackson Creek as part of the Bethune Street project.

The cost to acquire the easement would be $40,000 plus HST of $5,200, Land Transfer Tax of up to $400, survey costs of about $3,500, appraisal costs of about $2,000, real estate commission fee of about $1,695, plus legal fees and registration costs.

The easement would be part of the Bethune Street project that includes the reconstruction of the road and sanitary sewer along Bethune Street from Dalhousie Street to Dublin Street along with the construction of the Jackson Creek diversion flood reduction project.