Heritage Property Designation

busy downtown square

Heritage properties can be designated individually under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act. The City of Peterborough has 132 designated heritage properties, although there are many more buildings in the city worthy of designation.

Heritage designation is designed to help manage change in the historic buildings that are important to the character of our city. It helps preserve these important buildings so that they can continue to be enjoyed by the community. Designation also makes property owners eligible for financial incentives such as the Heritage Property Tax Rebate Program.

Our Heritage Register lists the individually designated properties in the City.

How Designation Works

The council of a municipality may, by by-law, designate a property within the municipality to be of cultural heritage value or interest. There are no fees associated with heritage designation. Properties must be researched and evaluated based on provincial regulation to determine whether they are of cultural heritage value or interest and worthy of designation. Council then must pass a by-law designating the property. A detailed description of the steps to designating a heritage property and its implications are located in our Guide to Heritage Designation.

If you are interested in having a property designated, you should contact the Heritage Preservation Office.

Heritage Permits

Owners of properties designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act need a heritage permit before altering their property. Permit applications should be submitted to the Heritage Preservation Office for review and approval. You should meet with City staff prior to submitting a permit application to determine whether the proposed work requires a permit and to discuss you plans.

Our Heritage Permit Guide for Individually Designated Properties provides detailed information on the application and permitting process and the application form.

Heritage Property Tax Rebate Program

We provide ongoing tax relief to certain heritage properties to assist owners in the maintenance of heritage features through the Heritage Property Tax Rebate Program. Under this rebate program, property owners can receive a 40% reduction in property taxes for a residential property and a 20% reduction for a commercial property.

In order to be eligible for tax relief under this program, a property must be designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act, have a heritage conservation agreement registered on title, and, with certain exceptions, be located in the central area of the city. Owners can apply by completing the Heritage Property Tax Rebate Program application form.

Historic stone house on Edinburgh Street

Frequently asked questions

 Why do we have the heritage property tax rebate program?

Why was heritage property tax program introduced?

In 2001, the provincial government passed legislation to create ongoing property tax relief for heritage properties. The Province recognized that historic buildings sometimes have higher maintenance and repair costs. The program supports owners who have chosen to protect their buildings through heritage designation. This is the most generous heritage incentive program ever introduced in Ontario and is designed to encourage good stewardship and investment in heritage structures.

Why is the City involved with this program?

The Heritage Property Tax Rebate Program aims to encourage preservation and improvement of our rich landscape of cultural and architectural landmarks. We recognize that well cared for historic buildings form a vital backdrop of making Peterborough a vibrant and inviting place to be.

Who is eligible for the heritage property tax rebate program?

What properties are eligible?

To be eligible to enter the Heritage Property Tax Rebate Program:

  • Designation of the building under Part 4 of the Ontario Heritage Act (Properties designated under Part 5 of the Act, as a contributing building in a Heritage Conservation District is not eligible).
  • The property must have a heritage conservation easement agreement registered on title in which the owner agrees to maintain the property to a recognized preservation standard.
  • Properties must be located within the central area of the City as defined by ‘Schedule J' of the Official Plan. This area takes in the downtown core of the city from Park Street on the west to the river on the east and from Perry and Crescent Streets on the south to McDonnel Street on the north. In addition, properties along Hunter Street East as far as Armour Road are also eligible.
  • The City has also included designated properties anywhere in Peterborough if designated prior to the passage of this program.
  • Council can include other properties outside of the stated geographic boundaries. These are on a case-by-case basis through a petition to Council.

Why does the program only cover the Schedule J area?

This is the oldest part of Peterborough and has a wealth of historic properties, including the downtown core. A central goal of the program is to assist in the revitalization of this area of the city.

How does the program work?

What is the cost of application to the program?

There is an application fee and a renewal fee, which paid every five years. The fees are:

  • $250 application fee for residential properties
  • $450 application fee for commercial properties
  • $200 renewal fee payable every five years.

Property owners with buildings in the Heritage Property Tax Rebate Program will receive a renewal form in the mail.

When is the application deadline?

Applications are due by February 28 of each year for a rebate for the previous tax year. Your property needs to be designated for the year before you receive your first rebate.

How much is the rebate worth?

We will provide a 40% tax rebate for eligible residential properties and a 20% rebate for eligible commercial properties.

How is the rebate assessed?

The tax rebate applied to the eligible heritage building or structure and the lands associated with it. With most designated properties in the city, the entire property is included in the legal description so the tax rebate will be calculated against the entire property tax bill. For example, a residential tax bill of $2,200 would receive a rebate of approximately $880 or 40% of the total assessment. The rebate will show up as a deduction on the tax bill.

What is a heritage conservation easement?

A heritage conservation easement is an agreement between the City and a property owner that is registered on the title of the property. It says that in exchange for the tax rebate offered under the program, a property owner will agree to maintain the property to recognized preservation standards for historic buildings.

Sometimes, if the property is of provincial or national significance, the Ontario Heritage Trust will hold the easement instead of the City.

Why is there a requirement for an easement or maintenance agreement?

Designation under the Ontario Heritage Act does not require an owner to do basic maintenance. The City cannot responsibly provide financial incentives without the commitment from a property owner to care for the property.

Can properties entered into the program be modernized?

If modernization means the installation of new vinyl windows in place of original wooden ones, or aluminium siding over wooden clapboard, then the answer is no. The reason for the tax incentive program is to recognize that heritage properties need special maintenance, which can be more costly than that on other properties.

At the same time, we recognize that people do not necessarily want to live in museums and we are eager to work with owners to help make heritage properties efficient, livable modern spaces. Similarly, designation does not usually extend to the interior of a building, unless there are very special features worth preserving.

Heritage designation is a planning tool to help manage change, not to prevent it.

What are the obligations of property owners who enter the program?

Property owners are expected to maintain the heritage attributes of their property as identified in the heritage designation bylaw and guided through the easement and maintenance agreement signed upon entry in to the program.

Owners need to observe the requirements of heritage designation, such as the submission of alteration application to city staff and Peterborough Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee for work, which may affect the heritage attributes of the property.

How is program monitored and enforced?

When a property enters into the program, an initial report will be prepared which outlines the heritage features of a property and their present condition. A member of City staff will inspect the property and photo-document all heritage attributes. This report will serve as a benchmark for comparison during follow-up inspections. Staff will also develop a maintenance plan to share with the property owner which outlines the attributes of the property which should be maintained.

Properties participating in the program are inspected annually to ensure that heritage elements are being maintained. A member of City staff will visit the property to monitor what heritage features may need maintenance or repair. An updated maintenance plan indicating areas of the property which require maintenance will be prepared and shared with the property owner.

What happens if a property owner does not fulfil their obligations under the program?

If a participating owner fails to maintain their heritage property in accordance with the terms, conditions, and intent of the Heritage Property Tax Rebate program and resulting easement agreement, the property owner may be required to refund the City for the full amount of the rebate provided to the owner with interest during any period of non-compliance.

Who receives the rebate where tenants are responsible for maintenance?

The program is directed at property owners since they pay the property tax to the City. Landlords certainly have the option of passing the tax rebates along to their tenants and may choose to do at their discretion.

Does a property have to be restored or just maintained?

The heritage elements noted in the designation by-law determine what is covered by the easement. It is expected that a property owner will maintain these elements of the property. Owners are not required to restore their property to a historic appearance or condition under this program. However, the City is happy to help owners who wish to restore properties with their tax savings to do so.

How much does the program cost taxpayers and where does the money come from to provide the rebates?

The municipal portion of the rebates will be covered by the City from the general tax levy. The education tax portion will be covered by the Province of Ontario. The rebates have already been budgeted and, therefore, the program will not result in a tax increase.

How long does the program last?

The program will provide on-going relief, so long as the property owner complies with their obligations under the terms and conditions of the program.

Are there any other grants or financial incentives?

The tax relief program is the City's primary financial incentive for heritage property owners. However, other grants or financial incentives sometimes become available, either municipally or provincially.

Individually designated properties

Please find below the heritage designation brief for each property designated under Part IV of the Act and the respective by-law for the property. 

Individually designated properties

 

Hutchison House (270 Brock St.)

Location and Legal Description: 270 Brock Street, Peterborough. The south 100 feet of that part of Lot 10 west of the C.N.P. north of Brock Street and west of George Street and the south 100 feet of the east 76 feet of 11 north of Brock Street and west of George Street.

Original Owner: Dr. John Hutchison

Owner and Occupant 1977: The Peterborough Historical Society.

Date Construction Commenced: 1837. Renovated in the 1850’s, 1860'5 & 1920's

Architect: Unknown.

Contractor and/or Builder: The Citizens of Peterborough

Site and Setting:

The house, located on the north-west corner of Brock and Bethune Streets, is slightly north-west of the main downtown section of Peterborough. A railway line swings past on the east side of the lot cutting off the back corner. The plot originallyy included, the lot to the west and considerably more depth, actually two full city lots. There is a moderate slope to Brock Street and a steep bank to Bethune Street and Jackson's Creek. The grounds are partially treed, with Norway Maples along the eastern edge, a spruce planted near the newer rear wing and a row of sugar maples along Brock Street. The site is a hillside position providing the basement kitchen with full-length windows at the north-east corner and the later rear wing with a ground level entrance. The upper level of the rear wing, which forms a separate apartment, is entered from a side door and vestibule on the west side near the north end.

Significance:

This is one of the oldest stone dwellings in Peterborough; a monument to citizens' co-operation for the benefit of the community; the dwelling of Peterborough's first resident doctor; and the home of Sandford (later Sir Sandford) Fleming between 1845 and 1847.

Historical Background:

The Hutchison House was built as a result of spontaneous community spirit. All the townspeople of Peterborough rallied to provide a suitable dwelling for their popular doctor, John Hutchison, to prevent him from moving to Toronto. Dr Hutchison was native of Kirkaldy, Scotland. Born in 1797, he emigrated to North America after completing his medical training in Edinburgh and Glasgow. He practiced in Cavan, Monaghan, Port Hope and Cobourg from 1818 until he moved to Peterborough in 1830. By 1836, Dr. Hutchison was seriously considering moving to Toronto because he could not get an adequate house for his wife and five children in Peterborough.

As an inducement to stay, the townspeople built the house at 270 Brock Street for him at a total cash cost of L45.18s.9d, or $224. The family lived here until Dr. Hutchison was stricken with typhus fever while tending the sick during an epidemic and died on July 1, 1847. Mrs. Hutchison and the children moved almost immediately to Toronto.

In mid April 1851, the property was purchased Harvey, a prominent Peterborough business man. His retained possession for four generations until Mrs. Connal Brown, a great grand-daughter, bequeathed it Peterborough Historical Society in 1969. Sir Sandford and his brother, David, were cousins of Dr. Hutchison. When they emigrated to Canada in 1845, David obtained a position as a cabinet maker in Hutchison House

Designation Brief:

Toronto, but Sandford lived with his cousin until 1847. His diary tells us that while here he tended the doctor's garden, building a dam and irrigation ditches from the creek, and constructed: a stable. He assisted Richard Birdsall with surveying, made working drawings for a new spire for St. Peter's Catholic Church and planned a house for "Haggart, the Taylor”. He also surveyed, drew and printed a "Plan of Peterborough”. He was about 18 years old at this time.

Exterior description for designation by-law: The Hutchison House is a storey and a half stone dwelling with a three bay front, a center doorway flanked on each side by windows, with end gables and later center front gable ornamented with simple, heavy rope bargeboards of the 1850's, and massive end chimneys with projecting caps. The east end is a full two and a half storeys in height with the basement level above grade at this point and the windows arranged in pairs on each storey. To the rear stretches a long wing of an upper and lower level, the upper ~ level of which is slightly higher than the ground level of the main block. This wing is of red brick, trimmed in buff brick and would appear to date from the mid 1860's. Along the east side of this rear addition stretches a ground level verandah with an awning roof, chaffered posts and very simple trelliage.

The stonework of the main block is of small stones laid in random coursed rubble with large, roughly shaped stones at the corners of the building and not around the openings. The front windows are now fixed glass with stained glass transoms. The end openings have center mullions and single pane, double hung windows, while the gable ends still have casement sash, some being original.

The front table is finished in rough-cast and sports hood mould. The opening is now like the end windows with and double hung sash. The front bargeboard has a pendant and finial at the peak.

The porch is also an addition with tapered octagonal columns, flared caps and neat bases, the supports holding a simple pediment. The detail is contemporary with the bargeboards and suggests the 1850's. However, the door case is original with its sidelights divided in width into one and a half panes. The door is a later four-panel design, either contemporary with the porch or renewed at the time of the brick addition.

Present Plans for the House: (1977) It is the intention of the Peterborough Historical Society to restore the basement and ground floor 1840 period, recreating the time when the Hutchison family was in residence. The upstairs bedrooms in the stone section and the lower level of the brick wing will be restored to the mid 1860 period by which time Elizabeth and Peter Connal were resident in the house.

On the exterior, the mid 1850's portico, gable and bargeboard trim will be retained and repaired. Casement windows, like the originals, will be installed. Where necessary the stone and brick will be re-pointed, and the entire structure re-roofed with hand split cedar shingles. In time it is hoped that the grounds can be planted in the period of the house and the picket and board fence of the period replaced.

The restoration plans are well underway under the capable direction of restoration architect, Peter John Stokes.

Credits: Peterborough Historical Society, PACAC, Martha Ann Kidd

Brief completed: 1977

Market Hall and Clock Tower (140 Charlotte St.)

Location and Legal Description: The Market Hall occupies part of Lot 1 north of Charlotte Street and east of George Street. It is situated on Lots 12 to 21 1nclus1ve of Reg. Plan No. 108 for the City of Peterborough.

Owner: Marathon Rea1ity Company Limited.

Date of construction: 1889

Architect and Contractor: John B. Belcher, Architect, Thomas Rutherford, Contractor

Significance:

The Market Hall with its clock tower is the principal monument of the downtown area. It is Peterborough's second market hall, replac1ng the first one erected in 1851. It is a valued example of late 19th century commercial architecture.

Historical Background:

In September 1889, the Peterborough Newspapers carried long and deta1led accounts of the ceremony of the laying of the corner stone and some of the history relating to the planning of this bui1ding. The handsome silver trowel with ebony handle, made by Mr. R. W. Muncaster and used by Mayor James Stevenson to lay the stone is now housed in the Peterborough Centennial Museum.

Site and setting:

This building is located on the southwest corner of what was, Peterborough's Market Square - or more clearly described as the northeast corner of Charlotte and Water Streets. The clock tower is visible from all directions.

Description of the Building:

This two storey, red brick structure is a fine example of late 19th century functional commercial architecture. The ground storey was planned for a series of shops and an arcade through the center from George Street to the Market Square at the rear. Later this arcade was closed off by an enclosed double concrete stairway at the rear and the arcade itself was converted to shops. The immense market hall with its ornamental timber trussed roof occupied the second and attic storeys. The Badminton Club used this huge and grand space for years after it ceased to function as a market. Until the recent renovations it was heated by huge wood burning stoves connected to a row of large single stack chimneys, which rose above the rear wall. The corner clock tower houses a clock with a Boston made mechanism connected to four large wooden dials, which face the four cardinal directions. The whole structure had been painted. The 1974-75 restoration removed the rear staircase and chimneys, the layers of paint and the disfiguring shop fronts; the brick work was repaired, the string course cornice above the shops, between the first and second storeys, was replaced and the shop fronts restored to almost their original appearance. The ‘almost’ refers to the half round transoms above the doors and windows.

originallyy they contained many paned sashes such as still remain in the transom sashes of the upper windows and the oval windows in the southeast turret. This was a diagnostic feature of the architecture of the 1890's. This is a rectangular red brick structure whose fifteen bays on the upper storey of the west facade are separated by simple pilasters. Some are slightly heavier or are broken by narrow vertical panels to give variety or to accent special decorative features, but each is finished with a stringcourse and a simple moulded cap.

The tall window openings are semi-circular and contain two pane, double hung sash windows and half-round, many paned transoms. The shop fronts of the ground storey echo in appearance, the semi-circular openings above but the construction is different. The openings are flat topped and the semi-circular door and window openings are made of cast iron. The center three bays (where the original arcade was located) appears to project slightly and is surmounted by a paneled and pilastered entablature and a monumental boxed cornice pediment, which contains a large stylized coat of arms. On either side of the entablature is a paneled parapet. The vertical lines of the structure are balanced horizontally by recessed panels below the second storey windows and by cornice like stringcourses above the openings of the ground and the second storeys. To avoid monotony, the long stretch of cornice to the north of the center feature is broken by a small oval, many paned window.

The appearance of the south side of the building echoes that of the west front, but the placement of the six bays differs, being composed of three groups of paired openings, the center pair divided from the outer pair by double pilasters. Above the center pair is a small version of the entablature and boxed cornice pediment, which is the principal decorative feature of the west front. This is flanked on either side by square turrets.

The one on the east corner is squat and contains oval many paned windows on the south and the east sides. The one on the west corner becomes a tall square clock tower with simple panels surmounted on all four sides by paired louvered openings. The large wood painted clock faces are surrounded by simple triangular mouldings and occupy the top brick section of the tower. Moulded brackets set on short square bases rest against the chaffered corners. Moulded stringcourses divide this section from the square tower below and the eight-sided sheet metal cupola above. Boxed cornice pediment dormers break the four sides of the cupola above the clock faces and an open lantern surmounts the whole with a finial at the roof peak.

A wealth of secondary detail enriches the surface of the building. Many, if not all, of the stringcourses and cornice mouldings and the monumental coat of arms in the pediment are constructed of moulded sheet metal.

The Market Hall and Clock Tower - N.E. Corner of Charlotte and George Streets.

This valued example of late 19th century commercial architecture is the principal monument of the downtown core. It is Peterborough’s second market hall, erected in 1889 to replace the old one built in 1851. John E. Belcher was the Architect and Thomas Rutherford was the contractor. The clock moved from the tower of the 1875 Bradburn Opera Building, which stood immediately to the north, bas served the people of Peterborough for over 100 years. When the remaining old buildings were demolished to make way for Peterborough Square this old structure, which had become the symbol of the city was retained and incorporated into the modern scheme.

St. John the Evangelist Anglican Church (118 Hunter St. W.)

Heritage Designation Brief - 118 Hunter St. W.

415 Rubidge St.

Lot and legal description: 415 Rubidge St., Peterborough. Situated one Block E. - also known as Lots 14 and 15 south of Brock Street and west of George Street.

Original owner: Rev. Peter Colin Campbell

Owners and occupants, 1977: The Masonic Lodge A.F.& A.M., Peterborough.

Date construction commenced: Built in 1847 for P. M. Grover. Changed in 1853 by Robert Nicholls. Added to in 1952.

Architect: Unknown

Contractor and/or builder: Unknown

Site and setting:

The building is situated in the center of a large block of flat land surrounded on four sides by streets. St. Peter's Cathedral occupies the block to the south and St. Andrew's Church and manse occupy the block to the north. The buildings to the east and the west were, in their prime, some of the finest dwellings in Peterborough. The area still retains much of its former elegance although many of the older dwellings have been renovated into apartments, put to other uses or have been replaced by St. Peter's Separate School. It is located a short distance west of the main business district. The plantings compliment the building, acting as a frame rather than a screen.

Significance:

An outstanding example of Greek Revival Architecture, modified in the Palladian manner. A type of building rare in Ontario. It was probably inspired by a "a design for a villa" appearing in Minard Lafever's Modern Builder’s Guide, 1833. The local Masonic Lodge held their first Peterborough meetings in this house from 1848 to 1853, and in 1950 purchased the home for their permanent quarters.

Historical background:

The Abstract of Title from the Ontario Registry Office, County of Peterborough, states that the Reverend Peter Colin Campbell was issued a Patent on the 16th day of October 1843 from the Crown. The Reverend Campbell was professor at Queen's College, Kingston, and later was appointed Principal of the University of Aberdeen, Scotland. The lot contained one and one-half acres, and the purchase price was one hundred and eight pounds.

On November 26, 1846 Peregrine M. Grover purchased the property, and built the center portion of the house. On June 15, 1847, it was sold to Louis Moffatt. On November 27, 1850, Robert and Charlotte Jane Nicholls purchased the property and added the two side wings and probably the front portico. During the ownership of the Otonabee Chapter 13 of the Oddfellows (under the name of Louis Moffatt) it was leased to the first Masonic Lodge in Peterborough. This Lodge, Corinthian 101, held its first meeting here on October 31, 1849, and its final meeting on April 20, 1853, prior to the occupancy of the Robert Nicholls.

The Executors of the Charlotte Jane Nicholls Estate sold the property to William Haydon Hamilton on the 29 of October 1906, and the house and property remained in the Hamilton family until it was sold, in 1950, to the Masonic Order in Peterborough.

Exterior description of building for designation by-law: The Grover Nicholls House is built of quarried stone in the Classical style of the temple-with-wings form. The center block contains two storeys, each with three bays. The entrance The Grover Nicholls House 415 Rubidge St., Peterborough is on one side with two French windows to the north. On either side of the center block is a one storey wing, each with two bays, giving the house a seven bay facade. The low gable end front of the center block is completed with a projecting monumental pediment supported by four square columns or piers, capped by simple moundings, creating a two storey classical portico. The roof trim has a boxed cornice and a plain frieze. The flat roofs of the two, one storey side wings, are finished with parapets with entablatures, creating a visual extension of the string course which divides the two storeys of the center block. These parapet roofs are supported by columns, or piers, which are one storey copies of the tall center columns and are flush with the front wall of the center block. Thus, the side wings are set back forming deep embrasures. The stonework is of small stones laid in random coursed rubble, with squared quoins at the corners and around the openings. The original chimneys, located on either side of the center block, are single stacks, also of stone. The wood head and side surrounds of all seven ground storey openings are moulded trim with corner rosettes. The French windows are surmounted by transoms. The windows on the sides of the building and on the second storey front facade are double hung sash windows, each sash containing six panes. The four panel door may be original. Marian Macrea, in the Ancestral Roof, Toronto, 1963, writes, on pages 138-9:

"The Peterborough house… is handled with a breadth and exuberance of composition… The sweeping boldness of the wing architraves could only be supported visually by pillars of such weight that they may be considered piers. Perhaps this builder owned a pattern-book. If he did, he shut it firmly before be began to draw. This is a Classical temple in the vernacular, countryman's Classic."

A large meeting hall, finished in rough cast plaster, was added to the rear of this house. Its corner stone bears the date 1952.

Credits: Peterborough Historical Society, PACAC, Martha Ann Kidd

Brief completed: 1977

Cathedral of St. Peter-in-Chains (316 Hunter St W)

Location and legal description: 320 Hunter St., W. Block D north of Hunter, west of George. L 14 and 15 N Hunter W George and S Hall W George. Peterborough, Ontario.

Original owner: The Roman Catholic Diocese.

Owners and occupants: The Episcopal Corporation of the Diocese of Peterborough.

Date construction commenced:

1837-1838: First four bays with projecting square tower and spire with decorated gablets built. 1884-1886: Transept/Sanctuary space and Sacristy added to north end. On original building, buttresses were added, tower was restored and spire replaced.

1931: Roof over Main Altar raised to correspond with height of Nave.

1967: South wall extended to front facade of tower and windows on each side added a fifth bay to the original structure. Vestibules constructed at the transept entrances. Interior alterations and renovations were made during each period of exterior change as well as in 1867 and 1923.

Architects: Unknown

Contractor and/or builder: Unknown.

Site and setting:

Facing south, St. Peter's commands an acre of land bounded by Hunter, Reid, Hall, and Rubidge Streets. This building, with other imposing structures in isolated blocks to the North and South, forms a core which was surrounded by the principal residential district of the 19th century Peterborough. Even in this age of skyscrapers, St. Peter's spire is a major landmark.

Significance:

The third stone church to be erected in Peterborough, St. Peter's retains much of its original Gothic style in spite of many renovations and additions. Until 1908-09, it alone served the Catholic population of the town of Peterborough and the adjoining townships of Smith, Douro, Otonabee, and North Monaghan.

Historical background:

The first services of the Roman Catholic Church were held in one of the log buildings erected on the Market Square in 1825. Then a small frame church was built on a grant of land bounded by George, Brock, Chambers, and Hunter Streets. It burned down in 1835 or 1836 and this location was abandoned. The nave portion of the present building was erected in 1837 and 1838 under the supervision of the pastor, Father John Butler. Built of stone quarried from Jackson's Park, it followed the simple Gothic Revival style prevalent in the early 1800's. Sanford Fleming, a youth of eighteen, living in Peterborough in the late 1840's, made a sketch of the church in his diary. He also recorded designing a new spire, but this plan was never used. The first church bell to ring in Peterborough hangs in the tower. Cast in Spain, it was given to the church by Bishop Macdonell of Kingston (1826-1840). St. Peter's became a Cathedral in 1882 and The Right Rev. John Francis Jamot was installed as the First Bishop of Peterborough on September 21st of that year.

Exterior description of building for designation by-law: St.Peter's Cathedral is in a cruciform, modified Gothic style. The altar end is square following the English, rather than the French, tradition. This square sanctuary end is surrounded by compatible wings which comprise the vestry. The cross gable roof is trimmed with projecting eaves and a frieze. All gables are of the parapet type. The squared rubble walls are braced by a plinth at the bottom, cut stone quoins at the corners, and buttresses at the sides. The single 150 foot centre tower and spire project slightly beyond the three bay gable facade. There is a main entrance in the tower and two auxiliary entrances in the main facade to either side of the tower. These entrances are centre pointed in shape, have radiating voussoirs at the top and moulded trim side surrounds. A rose window forms the transom of the centre entrance whereas the transoms of the side entrances are smaller, of plate tracery. The doors are plain, wooden, and double leafed. A shallow parapet gable, with a cross at the peak, surmounts the centre entrance. Above this is a large window opening, like those in the ends of the transept. The windows above the side entrances repeat those on the side of the structure. A slatted gothic opening, string courses, corbelling and buttresses complete the tower. Four pointed gables, with openings which repeat the design of the side windows, are located at the transitional point between the square base of the metal spire and its octagonal upper section. A string or belt course is located near the top of the spire which is terminated by a ball finial and cross.

The five window openings on either side of the nave are centre pointed and contain two stained glass lancet panes below a small single pane with plate tracery. The centre pointed openings at the ends of the transept contain three stained glass lancet panes surmounted by trefoil gothic tracery. The northern most part of the vestry contains three separate lancet openings. All major window openings are surrounded by cut stone arch radiating voussoirs at the top and by cut stone quoins at the sides. There are also several blind gothic openings with label head surrounds.

Credits: Peterborough Historical Society, PACAC, Martha Ann Kidd

Brief completed: 1978

St. Peter's Rectory (411 Reid St.)

Location and legal description: 411 Reid St., Peterborough Lot 16 N Hunter W George.

Owner: The Roman Catholic Episcopal Corporation of the Diocese of Peterborough.

Date of construction: 1860-65 (Militia Rolls)

Significance:

One of the Catholic holdings which surround St. Peter's Cathedral, this house is an early example of the simple Tuscan-Italianate style of architecture as it developed in this area. It was the home of John J. Hall for about twenty years prior to becoming the rectory for the Cathedral in 1887. It still serves in this capacity today.

Site and setting:

The Rectory is flanked by the Bishop's Palace to the west and by the "church blocks" to the east. It is at the hub of the fine residential district of the nineteenth century. The Rectory makes an admirable contribution to a distinguished area which includes St. Peter's Cathedral, The Grover-Nicholls Mansion, and St. Andrews United Church.

Historical background:

St. Peter's Rectory was built between 1860 and 1865 as the home of John J. Hall, son of Judge George Barker Hall of Beavermead. In l883 the Hall property was purchased by Mr. George A. Cox who quickly resold it, along with 350 Hunter St. (which later became the "Bishop's Palace"), to Bishop Dowling who had it renovated for a parsonage. In order to gain more area, the Bishop had the mansard top storey added to replace the original hip roof. For the last ninety years the building has served as a residence for the priests attached to the Cathedral Parish.

Exterior description of the building: originallyy a rectangular, two storey, three bay, hip roof dwelling, the mansard roof, added under Bishop Dowling in the 1880's, is the building's dominant feature today. There are three identical dormers on each of the north, east, and south sides and one on the west side. A verandah, which surrounded the house on the north, east, and south sides, was removed in 1968-9. The original door has been removed and a two storey addition was added to the rear in 1893.

St. Peter's Cathedral Centre (317 Hunter St. W.)

Location and legal description: 379 Rubidge St., Peterborough, Ontario "Block C" also known as Lots 14 & 15 South of Hunter and West of George Streets.

Owner: The Roman Catholic Episcopal Corporation of the Diocese of Peterborough.

Dates of construction: 1865 and 1890 (from Church Archives)

Significance:

Built as a school in 1865, this structure served in this capacity until 1970. The 1865 north half was erected in the style of a Regency/Gothic residence. The 1890 south half introduced Italianate details. Now the Cathedral Centre, it is a good example of how fine architecture can be recycled.

Site and setting:

The property consists of the entire “BLOCK C" bounded by Rubidge, Scott, Reid and Hunter Streets. The building is situated on the western half of the property with lawns at the rear and the parking lot at the front. Trinity United Church occupies the adjacent block to the south and St. Peter's Cathedral the one on the north side. On the east and west sides are fine nineteenth century residential areas.

Historical background: In 1854 a rough-cast one and a half storey school building was erected on this property. It consisted of two rooms, one for boys and the other for girls. In 1864 it was destroyed by fire but was replaced the following year by a solid brick building which forms the north half of the present structure. In design it followed the prevailing Regency/Gothic style with a centre gable, surrounding verandahs and a kitchen wing. In 1867 a school on Murray Street was built for the boys and four Sisters of the Congregation of Notre Dame established a day and boarding school for girls in this building which, in time, grew to have 271 day pupils and 25 boarders. In the fall of, 1890 a 39 x 52 foot addition consisting of four class-rooms was erected on the south side of the old building at a cost of $4,300. In 1902 The Notre Dame Sisters withdrew and were replaced by five Sisters of St. Joseph. Sometime during the early 1940’s the St. Joseph Sisters moved elsewhere and their quarters were converted into classrooms to accommodate two grades of boys. In June, 1970 the Separate School Board ceased to rent the building for educational purpose and the diocese initiated renovations which turned it into a centre for various parish activities.

Exterior description of building: This solid brick building comprises two main rectangular sections. The northern 1865 part is two and a half storeys high with seven bays, a centre gable and a centre entrance. It has a compatible rear wing on Reid Street. The southern 1890 part is two and a half storeys high, with three bays, a centre gable and an offset main entrance. The 1865 section has a cross gable roof trimmed with a boxed cornice, sloped soffit and frieze. The roof is broken by four dormers with overhanging eaves, two at the front and two at the rear. A small decorative panel graces, the peak of the centre gable on the front facade. This centre gable and frontispiece project slightly sand are offset by pilasters. The rectangular main window openings have radiating voussoir head surrounds and lug-sills.

St. Peter’s Cathedral Centre 379 Rubidge St.

They contain double hung six pane sash windows. There are two multi-pane round-top windows in the rear facade. The rectangular main entrance, with its radiating voussoir head surround, is located in the centre of the 1865 section. It contains sidelights, a transom of three panes and a four panel door. There is one chimney on the rear facade. The 1890 addition projects in front of the 1865 section and has pilasters at the corners. The medium hip roof is trimmed with a plain box cornice. The slightly projecting frontispiece, edged with pilasters, has a gable at the top which breaks the roof line; as do the centre gable in the older section. Except for the frontispiece and the paneled chimney at the rear, pilasters are placed between all the windows. A string or belt course divides the upper and lower storeys. Except in the frontispiece the windows are similar to those in the older section. In the frontispiece, the grouping of three narrow windows on each storey with the higher round-top window in the centre of the gable reflects the Italianate influence. The entrance is offset to the right is segmental in shape and has an arch radiating voussoir with keystone head surround. It contains side lights and a multi-pane transom. The door has four panels. There is a partial basement under the 1865 section and a full basement with large windows under the 1890 addition. The wall material in both is cut stone.

Bishop's Palace (350 Hunter St. W)

Location and legal description: 350 Hunter St. W. L 17 N Hunter W George. Peterborough, Ont.

Owner: The Roman Catholic Episcopal Corporation of the Diocese of Peterborough.

Date of construction: 1884 (Assessment Rolls)

Architect: Mr. Thomas Hanley

Builder: Mr. John W. Alfred

Significance:

An excellent example of late Victorian architecture, this building housed Peterborough's first Bishop after St. Peter's church became a Cathedral in 1885. The house was originallyy built for Senator George A. Cox, then mayor of Peterborough. It was one of the City's most elaborate homes.

Site and setting: An elegant member of the Catholic holdings which surround the Cathedral, the Bishop's Palace is located on the north-east corner of Hunter and Downie Streets. A promenade once linked this building with the Rectory to the east. Towering blue spruce trees adorn the spacious grounds surrounding the house.

Historical Background: Built in 1884, the house appears in the 1885 Assessment Roll, with George A. Cox the owner. The following article appeared in the Daily Examiner of Friday, 0ctober 16, 1885:

The fine residence, erected by Mr. Geo. A. Cox on this street, now occupied by J. H. Roper, of the Bank of Toronto, though built last year was finished this. It is one of the most complete and well finished residences in town. It is three stories in height, built of white brick with graphite pointings, and the elegant Mansard roof is covered with figured slate. Commodious balconies and verandahs add to the outside comfort. Inside wide, roomy halls communicate on each floor with the several rooms. On the first floor are a drawing room, parlour and dinning room. These are superbly finished, the ceiling and cornices especially, with elaborately beautiful stucco mouldings. All these have marble mantle open fireplaces. On this floor, also are the kitchen and pertaining offices, such as pantries, china closets, etc. Underneath the kitchen in the basement is the laundry with stationary tubs and hot and cold water service. The second floor, contain 4 bed chambers, dressing room and five closets and bath rooms. Three of the bedrooms are furnished with stationary marble top-wash bowls. The third floor contains a like number of rooms. All the windows are provided with inside folding Venetian blinds. The house is heated throughout with hot water, lighted with gas, and served with city water. The cellerage is exceptionally excellent, and indeed, the finishing of the residence throughout is of the highest character, and with its improved appointments, makes it a model residence. It was built from designs furnished by Mr. Thomas Hanley, Belleville, and Mr. John W. Alfred was the contractor and builder. The estimated cost of the entire structure with its appendages and offices is about $10,000, of which sum, about $5,000 was expended this year and should be credited to this seasons operations.

St. Peter’s Bishop’s Palace - 350 Hunter St. W

At first, the house was leased. to a Mr. J. H Roper; but in 1887 Cox sold the building to Bishop Dowling, the first Roman Catholic bishop of Peterborough. A kitchen with full basement was added in the same year when the house was renovated for use as the Bishop's residence. originallyy, there were two small verandahs on either side of the main entrance. The small open porch at the main entrance has been replaced by an arched canopy. The building originallyy had a mansard roof surmounted by wrought iron cresting - this roof was destroyed by fire in 1932. In that year, the present gable roof was added. In 1969, a two storey addition was added to the west of the building. This addition reflects the architectural character found in the original building. The single storey rear addition was also added in 1969.

Exterior description:

The Bishop's Palace is an irregular two and a half storey, four bay, solid brick structure with wings on the west side and at the rear. It has a cross gable roof, trimmed with a boxed cornice and brackets. A line of decorative brick work runs along between the first and second storeys on the main facade and one on the east side. The semi-circular main entrance is offset to the left in the Hunter Street (main) facade. It is surrounded at the sides and top by wooden moulded trim. The door itself contains two leaves, each with three panels: one moulded rail raised panel below two glazed panels. The main window openings are segmental in shape and have brick label head surrounds. The openings contain double hung sashes of two panes each. Above the main entrance are a pair of semi-circular stained glass windows.

62 Dunlop St.

Street Address: 62 Dunlop St.

Roll Number: 040119005000000

PIN Number: 284670043

Short Legal Description: P1A PT L13, 15 N Dunlop.

Names of Owners: Stephan & Debbie Stone

Owners’ Mailing Address: 62 Dunlop St. Peterborough, ON K9H 1R6

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: N/A

On Site Evaluation Date: N/A

Evaluation Category: A

Evaluators:

Heritage Type: Built Heritage – historic buildings

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date:

Comments: Update of Original Brief

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation:

An excellent example of the Regency Style, this building uses a unique building method of vertical log construction. Also know as stockade wall construction, hewn timbers are stood up side by side and tied together with lathe. The lathe is then plastered inside and out, giving a ‘roughcast’ finish on the exterior and smooth plaster walls inside. There were at least five other dwellings following George Stewart's plans, but Malone is believed to be the only one still in existence. The building was also unique for having in an inside bathroom with running water which was drawn from the Otonabee River, by means of a hydraulic pump, to a gravity tank above the nursery. Malone was one of the first houses to be built in the little community of Auburn, which was inhabited largely by the Stewarts and their friends. The property on which the house was built was given to Eleanor Stewart by her father, the Hon. Thomas A. Stewart, in 1847 as a wedding present. It takes its name from "Malone House", a manor house near Belfast, Ireland which belonged to the Legge family. Sir William Stewart married Jean Legge. Sir William was the great, great grandfather of the Hon. Thomas A. Stewart.

Current Owners: Stephan & Debbie Stone

Original Owner: Eleanor & Charles Dunlop

Architect: George Stewart

Date of Construction: 1852 (Records)

Builder: Edward Brown (T.A. Stewart's Son-in-Law)

Heritage Evaluation Criteria Note: Category A heritage properties are: "individually outstanding and have the broadest heritage significance in the City by virtue of architectural, historical, and environmental criteria along with overall integrity of design and construction. "Category A" properties generally hold provincial and/or national significance".

Context site and setting:

Malone was one of the first houses to be built in the little community of Auburn, which was inhabited largely by the Stewarts and their friends. Auburn now comprises a small area in the north-eastern quarter of Peterborough. Flanked on the west by both the old CNR right of way and the Otonabee River, Malone is situated on the north side and at the extreme west end of Dunlop Street. The Malone lot originallyy extended as far as the Otonabee, but now reaches only as far as the undeveloped road allowance at the north end of Auburn Street, no more than twenty feet west of the building. From Dunlop Street, Malone is entirely hidden by mature lilacs and locust trees. The locusts were planted by William Dunlop in 1870. The house is approached from Dunlop Street by long narrow lane bordered by lilacs. The house faces south looking out over a broad lawn planted with beds of perennials. Cedars define the eastern lot line and to the north and east stretch lawns and extensive gardens.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows and chimneys, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

  • overhanging eaves with shallow, panelled, wooden box soffits and narrow wooden fascia;
  • small wooden ventilators in soffits;
  • gable end wooden ventilators;
  • wrap around verandah with bell-cast roof and open curved rafters and including all trim together
  • with box-beam/wooden frieze, trim mouldings, matched board roof decking, posts, brackets,
  • plinth blocks, matched board wood decking and skirt;
  • all windows together with the openings, wood frames, wood sills, wood muntins and glazing;
  • main entrance including double-leafed wooden entry doors, wood panels and flanking side-lights
  • together with the openings, wood frames, sills, muntins and glazing;
  • all other entrances including entry doors together with the openings, wood frames, sills, muntins
  • and glazing;
  • exterior plaster ‘rough-cast’ wall finish together with wooden grounds at all openings, water table
  • and ribbon joists;
  • brick chimney
  • exterior basement stairs including entry door together with trim, wood siding, frames and sills.

Architectural description:

Malone is basically a one and a half storey T-shaped Regency house, with the stem of the T slightly offset to the right. To the rear have been added sheds which now function as a garage. The house has medium slope end gables and a centre gable in the main facade. It is a two-chimney dwelling of vertical log construction sheathed with plaster. There is a small shed dormer on the west side of the kitchen section. The roof has projecting eaves and verges, both of which are decorated on their undersides by panels. There are three additional gables: two identical ones with returning eaves on the east side and another on the west side of the kitchen. The main facade has three bays on the ground floor and an upper bay of three mullioned windows in the centre gable. The upper windows on the east and west sides have two sashes, are double hung, and have sixteen panes; the main windows no longer contain their small panes. All window openings are rectangular.

The main entrance is also rectangular and is located in the centre of the main facade. The entrance is surrounded by rather staid wooden moulded trim with pilasters. The entrance lacks a transom light but does have side lights of six panels each. The side lights are embellished by two emblems: the thistle of Scotland and the 'harp of Ireland. The door itself has two leaves of two raised panels each. It is unglazed. There is an original verandah which surrounds three sides of the house. The floor slopes away from the house to allow snow and rain to run off. Likewise, the roof, supported by the original butternut rafters, has a curved slope - this is termed an awning roof.

Historical description:

The property on which the house was built was given to Eleanor Stewart by her father, the Hon. Thomas A. Stewart, in 1847 as a wedding present. The land was part of the twelve hundred acres granted to Mr. Stewart by the Crown in 1822. Eleanor, third-born of Stewart's daughters, married Charles Dunlop in 1847 and lived on the Dunlop farm in 0tonabee Township until 1852. In that year, George Stewart, Eleanor's brother, drew the plans and drafted the instructions for the construction of a Regency house. The result was "Malone", a copy of Thomas A. Stewart's own "Auburn" of which a water-colour by Ann Langton still survives. The construction of Malone entailed a stone foundation with a cellar under at least part of every room but the dining room. Nine by eleven inch hewn cedar timbers, felled on the property, were placed upright on sleepers (which rested on the stone foundation) and then battened together. The entire frame was then covered with hand split lath and plastered both inside and outside. The floors, window frames, and doors were fashioned of red pine. The tongue and grooved floor boards are four to six inches wide and one and three-quarters inches thick. As built in 1852, the house contained a kitchen, dining room, living room, library, and hall on the ground floor; the second floor comprised three bedrooms, a nursery, a bathroom, and a hall sitting room (typical of' early Ontario homes). Oddly enough, the bathroom had running water which was drawn from the Otonabee River by means of an hydraulic pump and a gravity tank above the nursery. The north bedroom sported a stove for warmth. Between 1858 and 1860, a six room addition was constructed to the west of the kitchen. Two doors from the kitchen and one from the hall opened into the three ground storey rooms. A staircase room, a bathroom, and a dressing room comprised the second storey. A staircase connected the two storeys, a door opened into the upper hall, and a sliding door connected the second bathroom with the nursery. This entire wing was removed in 1968 when the house was restored to its original plan by Dr. Honey.

The floors in the dining room, the three bedrooms, and the nursery, (now the guest room) are the original pine boards. The upper portion of the banister in the main stairway is original - the lower section was latheturned in the late 1860's. The doors on the ground floor are original: the windows were altered by Dunlop in 1890. Some of the windows do retain their or1ginal glass panes. Upstairs, two doors- one leading into the bathroom and the other leading into the west bedroom - have been reproduced to match their original counter-parts.

In the library is a glassed opening allowing a view of the cedar log construction; a similar aperture enables one to view the hand split lath in the bedroom. Malone was graced by one f1replace alone – a singular circumstance at the time. The single living room fireplace has been restored to its original design and opening. The brick oven (now in the kitchen) was originallyy in the basement under the foundation of the living room fireplace. The oven has long since been bricked in. The verandah, which encompasses three sides of the house, is original.

originallyy a small farm, Malone was sold by Dunlop in 1890 and acquired by a Mr. Green, lawyer, in 1919. The present owner, Dr. Honey, bought the house from Green in 1968. The name "Malone" has its roots in Ireland. "Malone House" was a manor house near Belfast and belonged to the Legge family. Sir William Stewart married Jean Legge. Sir William was the great, great grandfather of the Hon. Thomas A. Stewart.

238 Dublin St.

Location and legal description: 238-40 Dublin St. PT L8 N Dublin W George SE CNR F 77.670 D 67.000

Owner: Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Bird

Date of construction: 1846-50 (Maps, Style, Census)

Significance:

This is one of the few remaining examples of the Regency-Georgian tradition as it evolved in this area from the United Empire Loyalists. A two storey frame dwelling, the house sports several features indicative of mid-nineteenth century architecture. It retains its symmetry, fine proportions, small-pane windows, low gable ends, and its doorway with sidelights and transom.

Historical background:

Though it does not appear on Sandford Fleming's 1846 Plan of Peterborough, the house was probably built shortly thereafter: a two storey frame house appears in the 1851 Census, owned by John Williamson, merchant tailor. In 1866, the house was sold to James Campbell, a general merchant, who maintained ownership at least until 1880. In 1882 the property decreased in value as part was sold to the Midland Railway for their branch line between Peterborough and Lakefield. By the 1890's the house was owned by William Green, a painter, and Francis Green, both of whom were grandsons of Benjamin Green, the Soap and Candle maker of the 1850's. Much later, during the 1950's, two of the windows on the west end of the building were converted into doors and an exterior stairway leading to the second floor was added. The porch, too, was probably added at this time. The door leading onto the balcony was originallyy a window. The house has never been painted - it retains its original stucco finish.

Site and setting:

Situated on the north-west corner of Aylmer and Dublin Streets, 238 Dublin Street almost fills a small triangular lot whose longest side is defined by the CNR line to the north west. The house sits at the foot of the large hill which rises to the north west beyond the railway track.

Exterior description of building:

This rectangular, two storey, three bay dwelling is a low gable-end frame structure that has been sheathed with plaster. The flat window openings have plain wooden lintels, side surrounds, and lug-sills. The windows are double-hung and have two sashes, each of six rectangular panes. The flat entrance in the centre of the main facade is surrounded by wooden moulded trim and contains recessed side lights and a transom with mullions. The house was originallyy graced by a fence which was almost identical to that which now surrounds the restored Hutchinson House.

548 Weller St.

Location and legal description: 548 Weller St., Peterborough, ON P49 L12 F 160.750 D 220.000

Owner: Mrs. Donaldson Whyte

Date of construction: 1855 (Registry Office Records)

Significance:

The house is a splendid Classical Revival adaptation of the Loyalist tradition as it evolved in Peterborough in the mid- 1850's. It was once owned by Mr. C.A. Weller and once inhabited by Mr. Boucher, both of whom were County Court Judges.

Site and setting:

Set amid spacious grounds, 548 Weller Street is located just to the west of Walton Street on the north side of Weller. The house was never orientated towards the street but faced east onto an oval carriage way which was embellished by a raised flower bed in the centre of the drive. The beauty of the grounds is enhanced by several massive butternut trees.

Historical background:

Built in 1855, the house was constructed on what was originallyy a park lot just at the edge of the city limits. Christopher Marshall, a local grocer, acquired the land in 1853 and then worked some kind of an agreement with Judge Boucher whereby the judge built the house on Marshall's property. It was a large rough cast frame dwelling with an awning roofed verandah surrounding it on three sides. The house was two stories high, with a finished third floor and had wood and tool sheds extending all along the rear. The building was heated by a couple of wood stoves on the second floor and by fireplaces on the ground floor. The house was set in comfortably from the dirt street, as were the other houses built at the time in this area. In 1855 there were probably only six other houses on Weller Street which was distinguished by its wooden sidewalk.

In 1856 the Marshall estate sold the house and property to Judge C.A. Weller for ₤800. Judge Boucher remained as tenant until 1869. During the period from 1855 to 1885, the house was plagued by floods which issued from Jackson's Creek and which were aided by the building's location at the base of the large hill to the west.

In 1869 Judge Weller rented the house to Henry Beal, a miller, who occupied the building until 1874. The miller kept his two teams of horses in the large barns at the rear of the house. These barns, along with several sheds, were torn down by 1882. After the Wellers sold it in 1873 the house changed hands several times before it was purchased by John A. Aylmer in 1916. In 1925 Aylmer had the verandah removed and probably added the closed porch to the west and the trellis-work verandah to the east. At some time between 1916 and 1935 the main windows were altered (small panes were installed) to conform more closely to the style of the 1850's. In 1946 Dr. Donald Whyte acquired the house and in 1951 built a flat-roofed bungalow onto the west of the house. The addition comprised five rooms and was built for Mrs. Whyte's parents. Dr. Whyte had the main building repainted, partly re-plastered, and the verandah re-roofed. Weller- Boucher House 548 Weller St.

Exterior description of the building:

548 Weller Street is an outstanding example of symmetry and fine proportion as expressed in the Classical Architecture brought to Canada by the United Empire Loyalists. It is a rectangular, stucco-clad dwelling, two and a half storeys high, with a medium gable roof. There are two single brick chimneys at either end of the building. The roof trim consists of a plain boxed cornice with frieze and returned eaves on the gable ends. The east end of the building is broken, on the ground floor, by the offset main entrance only. This entrance is magnificent. It contains a semi-elliptical fan transom, side lights, and fine wooden moulded trim surrounds. The head surround is broken by a keystone and fluted pilasters form the side surrounds. The embrasure is embellished by colonnettes. The door itself, with its six panels, is probably original. The finely balanced street facade is unusual. Instead of the traditional odd number of window openings, this facade has four, flat, rectangular, window openings on each floor (primarily because this facade lacks an entrance). The double hung, six pane sash windows are the same size on both floors.

468-474 Stewart St.

Location and description: 468-470-472-474 Stewart St., Peterborough, ON PT 11 S Murray & W George F 103.500

Owner: Bernard Von Graeve

Date of construction: 1838 (Assessment Rolls)

Significance:

One of Peterborough's oldest structures, and its only remaining brewery house, this venerable stone building is important both architecturally and for the multiplicity of uses to which it has been put. The thick walls, built of stone from Jackson's Park Quarry, are an excellent example of the rubble coursed technique prevalent in early Peterborough. The unusual shape of the building announces its original use as a factory. During its long history it has served as a brewery house, a soap and candle factory, a Protestant Home, and a slum tenement. It is now restored for use as town-houses.

Site and setting:

The Brewery is located on the lot immediately north of the Hutchinson House at the junction of Stewart and Murray streets where their progress is interrupted by the Jackson Creek Valley. From the north end of the building a set of steps descends the embankment and leads to a small footbridge which spans the creek. The building is built into the embankment which falls away to the east this embankment is braced by a stone wall to prevent erosion.

Both the railroad and Jackson's Creek flow past the house at the foot of the embankment. While not a small structure, the Brewery's low profile and position make it unobtrusive when approached from any direction.

Historical background:

Located beside Jackson Creek for easy access to water, this brewery first appears in the 1838 Assessment Roll. In 1844 John W. Bedford became the owner. Sandford Fleming shows it on his 1846 Plan of Peterborough. In the succeeding years until 1870 the building changed hands numerous times. Records show that in 1860 and 1861 it was a soap and candle factory operated by partners Hood & Olgivy. Just prior to 1870 the owner was Henry Calcutt whose brewery and steam ship line was later located in Ashburnham. In 1870, after extensive interior renovations, it became the Protestant Home under the nominal ownership of James Hall, Sheriff. The building was a refuge for the aged and destitute until the erection of Anson House in 1912.

Exterior description:

The Brewery is an unusual rectangular structure with its salt box shape and its coursed rubble stone walls. Built into the embankment it is one and a half storeys high on Stewart Street and two and a half at the rear. The large expanse of roof is broken by three single brick chimneys and six dormers with overhung gables (three at the front and three at the rear). The cornice on the main facade is boxed and plain, while on the gable ends a frieze has been added. The ground storey of the main facade has an off centre main entrance which now contains two doors. originallyy it had a single door surrounded by side lights. The four remaining window openings (one has been closed up) are rectangular and contain casement windows whose original small panes have been replaced. A single door gives access to the north side and the windows and doors on the east side are compatible with those on the rest of the structure.

183 Mark St.

Location and legal description: 183 Mark St., Peterborough, Ont. P1A L1 S 50 feet of N. 1 64 feet of E 105 feet of lot 1 S of Maria & W of Mark PL lA F 38

Owner: Mr. & Mrs. D.A. Harwood

Date of construction: 1846-1850 (Maps and Records)

Significance:

This small handsome house is probably the only gable facade stone dwelling in the city of Peterborough and one of the very few in the county. The building housed some of early Peterborough's most eminent citizens: A.H. Peck, brewer; his son, E.A. Peck, Conservative member of the Dominion legislature; Mary Armour (Mrs. A.H. Peck), daughter of Rev. Samuel Armour; and John D. Armour, at one time Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada.

Site and setting:

Situated in Ashburnham, well away from the hubbub of centre town, the Peck House is located on the shore of Little Lake, just west of the Mark Street wharf. Surrounded by ample grounds, few Peterborough homes command a more delightful view. A perfect picture of the Little Lake Centennial fountain is obscured only slightly by the many varieties of trees.

Historical background:

This gable facade stone dwelling was built for Mr. Arthur Henry Peck, whose stone brewery was located about a block west of the house. The brewery has long since been destroyed by fire but the house, with modern additions, remains. Mr. Peck's wife was Nancy Armour, daughter of the Rev. Samuel Armour, the first Church of England Clergyman in the town of Peterborough. Mary Armour's brother, who became the owner of the house in 1885, was John D. Armour, Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada. Peck himself was a strong Anglican and served a year (1874) as Churchwarden of St. John’s (indeed, on Sundays he occupied pew #72 at the same church). Mr. Peck's son, E.A. Peck, represented Peterborough in the Dominion legislature for many years as a Conservative M.P. Throughout its long history the house was heated by stoves – it never had a fireplace. It did, however, have two minor fires, one of which is believed to have been started by tramps who frequented the house during the 1930's.

Since the Harwoods acquired the house in 1953, two sympathetic additions have been constructed: the rear addition was built in 1959; the side addition in 1964. One stairway has been removed and another, formerly outside, is now enclosed in the rear addition. The south-east upper window was added in 1964 in the interests of symmetry-it is a fine simulation of the style of the period. The remaining upper windows are original as are the random width red pine boards on the upstairs floors.

Exterior description of building:

The house, without its recent additions, is a rectangular, one and a half storey, gable facade, two bay dwelling. The walls are constructed of random coursed rubble which probably came from the Jackson's Park quarry. There are no chimneys; the roof surface is broken only by a single shed dormer on the north side. The roof trim consists of boxed cornices on both the eaves and the gable ends. The flat window openings have plain wooden trim and lug-sills. They contain casement windows of two sashes each with eight panes. The upper windows have single sashes, nine panes, slip-sills, and plain lintels of wood.

The Peck House - 183 Mark Street

The main doorway is located in the gable façade and is offset to the right. It is flat, like the window openings, and has plain wooden trim only. There are no sidelights or transom.

279 Sherbrooke St

Location: The lands and buildings, known municipally as 279 Sherbrooke St. are on the northwest part of Lot No. 11, south of Sherbrooke Street and west of George Street, in the City of Peterborough, in the Province of Ontario.

Owner: Mr. Iain St. Clair Dobson, 1 Dundas Street West Suite 2100, P.O. Box 18 Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1Z3.

Occupant: Dr. W. A. C. H. Dobson.

Date of construction: 1870-1872.

Significance:

This dwelling is a fine example of a 19th Century Regency Cottage. It has several special architectural features, unusual for Peterborough: both Flemish Bond and Common Bond methods of laying the brick were employed; it is square in plan with a truncated hip roof; and has a narrow, double-leaf front door. James Menzies, the original owner, was a leading tailor in the city from the 1850's to the mid 1880's.

Site and setting:

The house, located on a corner lot, is set fairly close to both Sherbrooke and Stewart Streets. A driveway separates it from the adjacent house on the east. A yard and a park-playground at the rear and the corner location gives the dwelling an unencumbered, open setting. It is south-west of Peterborough's commercial center and a block from the old South Central School, opened in 1874. Sherbrooke was originallyy the main road west to Cavan Township.

Historical background:

James Menzies was born in Scotland about 1820 and came to Canada with his wife, Jane, and four children in the early 1850's. By 1858 he was established as a tailor in Peterborough and owned his own house near the south-west corner of Hunter and Aylmer Streets. The assessment and collector's Rolls indicate that in 1871 or 1872 James Menzies, with his wife and eight children, moved to a new house on the Sherbrooke-Stewart corner. His son, John, a tanner, had moved to the site in 1870 and apparently saw to the building of the house Which is illustrated on the 1875Bird's Eye View of Peterborough. By 1876 John had built his own house on the south part of his father’s lot. James Menzies died about 1885 but his widow continued to occupy the house for many years.

Exterior description of building for designation by-law:

279 Sherbrooke Street is a solid red brick, one storey, square, center hall plan Regency Cottage with a solid brick one storey kitchen wing. The brick exterior has been painted. The house has a medium pitched truncated hip roof broken in the center front by a hip roof dormer containing a double hung, segmental topped sash window. The foundation is of rough dressed, random placed granite stone. On the sides facing the two streets the brickwork starts three bricks below that of the other sides. A plinth encircles the house. The method used to lay the bricks varies: on the sides facing the two streets it is Flemish Bond and on the other sides it is Common Bond. (Flemish Bond is extremely rare and Stretcher Bond rather than Common Bond is the usual technique used to lay brick in both solid and brick clad structures in Peterborough). All window openings in the main structure are alike and have radiating voussoir head surrounds. They contain double hung sash windows with two panes to a sash on the street sides and six panes to a sash on the east side. There are two windows on each of the west and north sides and three on the east side. The main center door opening is the same shape and height as the window openings, but slightly

The James Menzies House - 279 Sherbrooke Street, Peterborough

It contains a transom and a double-leaf door, each leaf containing three panels, of which the top one is glazed. Alterations to the rear kitchen wing are in sympathy with the style of the main structure. New chimneys have been added to both the east and the west sides of the main structure.

Brief prepared by Martha Ann Kidd

Photographs by Martha Ann Kidd

Date: July 1 1980

260 Engleburn Ave

Location: The lands and buildings, known municipally as 260 Engleburn Avenue, on the north side of Engleburn place, east of Engleburn Avenue. All and singular and certain parcel or tract of land and premises situate, lying and being in the City of Peterborough, in the County of Peterborough and Province of Ontario and being composed of part of Block A according to Registered Plan Number 124 for the said City of Peterborough now designated as Part 6, Plan 45R3531. Dated this 14th day of February, 1980.

Owner and occupant: Mr. Dennis J. Young.

Date of construction: 1853.

Architect and/or builder: Unknown.

Significance:

The house is the finest example of English Palladium, also termed Classical Revival, architecture in the Peterborough area, if not in Ontario. It was built in 1853 for the Reverend Mark Burnham, son of Hon. Zacheus Burnham, who was the largest land owner in Otonabee Township and in Ashburnham Village. Rev. Mark Burnham was the fifth rector of St. John's Anglican Church, Peterborough, between 1852 and 1857 and helped to establish St. Luke's Anglican Church in Ashburnham.

Site and setting: The house is located in the former village of Ashburnham, east of the Otonabee River and north of Little Lake on a small parcel of land which is all that remains of the original 25 acres of landscaped parkland with which it was originallyy surrounded. Its spectacular view across the Otonabee River to Peterborough is blocked with substantial early 20th Century houses.

Historical background: The Burnham Family trace their ancestry in England back to at least the Norman Conquest if 1066. In 1635 three brothers came to North America and settled in New England where there are still numerous descendants. Following the American Revolution four Burnham brothers immigrated to Canada and settled in and near Port Hope and Cobourg. Zacheus, the father of Rev. Mark Burnham (subject of this paper), among other activities, had an influential position in the “family compact". As treasurer of the Newcastle District, he oversaw its survey and was in a favourable position to acquire excellent water power sites and other land which formed the basis of the family fortune. The Reverend Mark Burnham, the only son of Zacheus, was born at Cobourg in 1804, educated in Dr. Strachan's school and at Queen's College, Oxford (BA 1829, MA), was ordained deacon in 1829 and served as rector of the parish of St. Thomas from 1829 to 1852. He came to Peterborough in 1852 and served as rector of St. John's Anglican Church until late in 1857 when he retired following the death of his father. Until his death in 1877, he remained active as a missionary and benefactor to St, Mark's, Otonabee and St. Mark's, Warsaw. He also donated the land on which St. Luke's, Ashburnham was erected in 1876.

He was married to Hetty Stickney Bostwick of Pt. Stanley, and had four sons and a daughter. Rev. Burnham was mainly interested in managing his property and pursuing the arts. He built one of the finest houses in the Province, the design being inspired by his sojourn in England. He possessed one of the finest private libraries in the Province and added a library wing (now demolished) to his Peterborough home, "Engleburn". He also compiled THE COLONIAL HARMONIST, a book of hymns and chant& which he had published in Port Hope in 1832. He was on the building committee of the Union School, a direct successor of the school of Armour and Taylor, earlier rectors of St. John's.

 "Engleburn” is the name the Rev. Mark Burnham gave to his estate in Ashburnham, an independent village on the east side of the Otonabee River until it became part of Peterborough in 1903. The house is a large two storey cream brick mansion built in 1853 in Classical Revival, or more accurately, English Palladium style. It has a wide entrance hall and a staircase hall at the rear. The rooms are spacious and beautifully proportioned with tall bay windows. The large drawing room is divided by a double fireplace. The simple Doric style portico, which originallyy graced the front entrance was removed to the side entrance and replaced by a large two story porch with a monumental pediment in the early 1900's. The present side entrance was originallyy the door leading into the library wing, which has been demolished. During the Burnham occupancy the house was furnished and appointed with the finest of furniture, china, glass and silver.

The extensive grounds were beautifully laid out with walks, gardens, shrubbery and a tennis court. The view across the Otonabee was spectacular. The house was surrounded by a moat-like trench for drainage purposes. It and the well kept walks were of stone quarried in New York State. E. Whitefield, who travelled through this area in 1853 or 1854, made a sketch of the house which is in the Public Archives of Canada. Before her death, Miss Florence Burnham, a grand-daughter of Rev. Mark Burnham, recalled some of her impressions and memories. She remembered the long corridors and the carrying of meals from the kitchen at the rear of the house through devious routes to the dining room. She told of the opportunity missed of being honoured with an overnight visit by the Prince of Wales, later King Edward VII, in 1860. Mark Burnham was happy, and probably honoured, to place his house at the Prince's disposal until he learned that he was expected to vacate the house during the visit. He decided that there would be no entertaining of royalty in his home unless he was in residence. In consequence the Prince's visit to Peterborough was cut short and he continued on to Port Hope for the night.

Mr. McAllister, whose stone mill was an Ashburnham landmark for many years, purchased the house from the Burnhams in 1903. In 1910 it was sold to Judge Huyke. Later it was purchased by William Tinker who converted it into apartments. It was purchased from the Tinker Estate in 1980. The new owner, Mr. Dennis Young, is actively engaged in its restoration.

Exterior description of building for designation by-law:

“Engleburn" is a single detached unit - it contains 5600 square feet of living space, exclusive of the full basement. Plan - square, with two storey projecting bays in the centre of each side and a rear kitchen wing. Main structure - 2 storeys in height, solid brick stretcher bond construction with brick quoin decorations at each corner.

Basement - under entire main structure with bearing walls under all upper storey walls and arch supports under all fireplaces.

Foundations - random laid granite rubble, finished on exterior with stucco scored to resemble ashlar blocks.

Roof - low truncated hip type. The eaves on all sides have a moulded fascia, and a plain soffit of wood plus a brick decorated frieze with small brackets.

Chimneys - One is offset to the left the other is offset to the right and both are - offset towards the front of the structure. They are both double, joined at the bottom. The bases are rectangular and  the two separated stacks become octagonal and are finished at the tops with string courses and decorated brick cresting.

Windows - The structural shape of all window heads is flat. They are all trimmed with moulded head and side surrounds. In addition those on the first storey are surmounted by plain pediments supported on each side by brackets; those on the second storey are surmounted by entablatures supported on each side by brackets. The trim within the structural openings is all moulded. All the window sills are lug sills. Except for two altered and one new window, all windows are of the double-hung sash type. Those on the second storey still contain their original six panes to each sash. The muntins in the first storey windows have been removed and now each sash contains a single pane of glass.

Window locations - On the front facade, the three upper windows are directly above the centre door and the two flanking windows. On the south side, except for a small new window the three windows on each storey are located in the two storey projecting bay. This feature is repeated on the north side, which also has a renovated window east of the bay and directly above the side entrance. On the rear, or east side, there are three evenly spaced windows on the second storey, of which, the north one has been renovated.

Doors- The structural shape of the door heads is flat. The main entrance, in the centre of the front facade, has a brick voussoir head surround, but no side surrounds. The trim within the structural opening is moulded. It has a flat transom. (The transom infill and the door are not original.) The side entrance is on the north side, east of the two storey bay. The moulded head and side surrounds duplicated that of the windows. The trim within the structural opening is moulded. The door is an original single leaf, six panel door like those used in the interior. It has been cut down to fit the space. (This was originallyy the entrance to the library wing, now demolished). Porches- The large two storey front porch with its monumental pediment, replaced the original Classical Doric porch which is now located over the side entrance. With the approval of the Peterborough Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee, the present owner plans to restore the original porch to its original location, in the centre of the front facade.

Rear kitchen wing - Of solid brick, stretcher bond construction, it is 1½ storeys in height with a salt box shaped roof and a gabled parapet end wall with a single stack chimney at the peak. The original double hung windows on the first storey contain twelve over eight panes in the sashes. One original double hung sash window on the half storey contains eight over eight panes.

Other features-- Most of the main structure is surrounded by the remains of a stone drain, directly under the eaves, to carry off the rain water.

Brief prepared by Martha Ann Kidd

Photographs by Martha Ann Kidd & Kenneth E. Kidd

84 Benson Ave

Location: The lands and buildings, known municipally as 84 Benson Avenue. All and singular and certain parcel or tract of land and premises situate, lying and being in the City of Peterborough, in the County of Peterborough and Province of Ontario and being composed of Lot 15, Registered Plan Number 71 for the said City of Peterborough.

Owners and occupants: Christopher and Janet Greene.

Architect: William Blackwell.

Date of construction: 1886 -1888.

Site and setting: The house is situated at the top of the Benson Avenue hill next to the former Peterborough Teachers College, now the property of the Peterborough County Beard of Education, whose property surrounds it on three sides and provides a secluded setting. The house, which faces west, is set about eighty feet back from the street.

Significance:

The house is an early Peterborough example of the Queen Anne Revival Style. It was designed by the architect William Blackwell as his own residence, and was the first house he designed in the city. It was, therefore, meant to be an example of his domestic architectural ability, a sort of advertisement for the practice he was just starting in Peterborough.

Historical background:

William Blackwell was born in 1850 in a house in Douro Township - now 1066 Armour Road, Peterborough, Ontario. His father, James Blackwell had settled in Douro Township in 1835. William Blackwell studied architecture in Toronto with Walter Strickland and subsequently worked for several years in the prairies. It was there he met his wife, the English-born Annie Hales, whom he married in 1884. In that year he returned to Peterborough to establish a practice and began the construction of his Benson Avenue home two years later, moving in while it was still unfinished.

In later years he designed a number of dwellings and other buildings in the city, often in collaboration with architect John Belcher, to whom credit is sometimes given. Among the designs attributed to him are those for Nicholls Hospital - now the Eastern Pentecostal Bible College, the Young Men's Christian Association, the Young Women’s Christian Association, the recently demolished Aylmer Street Fire Hall, the recently abandoned Public Library an George Street, the new parish house for St. John’s Anglican Church, the long disappeared Isolation Hospital and Anson House. He was supervising architect for the armories, construction 1907-09.

Mr. Blackwell was active in the architectural profession in Ontario. In July 1890 he was appointed to the founding council of the Ontario Association of Architects.  Mr. Blackwell retired from active practice in 1926, and his firm was carried en by his son, Walter R. L. Blackwell, who moved the main office to Toronto where it became the firm of Blackwell, Craig and Zeidler. Walter Blackwell also designed a number of houses in Peterborough.

William Blackwell resided in his Benson Avenue house until his death in 1937 and his widow lived there until her death in 1952.

Exterior description of building for designation by-law:

This two and one-half storey house is basically rectangular in plan, with a .one and onehalf storey five foot projection at the left rear (northeast corner) and a two storey projecting bay to the right of the centre of the front facade, which is the narrow side. The construction is of solid red brick laid in stretcher bond. A brick plinth surrounds the house on the front and sides. It is four bricks in height with an additional moulded top course, except on the north side where it is nine bricks in height. The foundation is random laid granite rubble.

The steep truncated hip roof descends to one and one-half storey height over the rear wing and has a large offset projecting gable over the front bay. The facade of the gable, which contains a double casement window, is finished in stucco and decorated with false half timbering. It is carried on four heavy wooden brackets where it projects to either side of the bay below it. The original bracketed chimney towards the front on the north side has been continued to the ground on the exterior. Another chimney integral with the rear wall is found at the southeast corner. The boxed cornice has a moulded rib at the inner edge.

There is a recessed porch at the left front behind a semi-circular radiating brick voussoirs with a slightly projecting false keystone of at the left of the arched opening is a short parapet with a granite arch of brick coping.

The heading of the front door opening is a segmental arch of brick. The trim within the opening is moulded. The high single leaf door has a chamfered frame around the one horizontal and two vertical panels, which have moulding at top and bottom. Above the panels are three lights whose tops follow the curve of the arch.

Above the porch is a double casement window, with six panes in each of the wooden casements. On each floor of the front bay is a triple casement window under a segmental arched brick header; that on the first floor having transoms above the casements. The casements are divided by deep moulded wooden mullions. On the first floor the two side casements contain two panes each while the central casement has a single pane. The casements on the second floor are all divided into three sections, the lower two containing one pane each and, the upper one, nine.

All the windows in the house are also inward-opening casements except for one small six over six, double hung sash window on the first floor on the south side, which was added in the 1940 s. On either side of this window are two shallow triple casement bays which do not project beyond the wall line. Each casement has twelve panes. Toward the rear there  is a double casement of less height than the others. On the second floor on the south side are two double casements of equal height but of different designs; that toward the southwest having a central mullion. The stair window on the north side is a stepped cluster of four casements. Only the front windows, the stair window and the eastern second floor window on the south side are original. All others were added or replaced the original windows during renovations carried out by Mr. Blackwell in the 1920s. At that time a sun porch was added at the southeast corner and a garage at the northeast. In 1974 a one storey wooden extension was added at the northeast corner at the rear.

Brief prepared by Mr. Christopher Greene.

Photographs by Mr. Christopher Greene

June, 1980

266 Burnham St

Location: The lands and buildings, known municipally as 266 Burnham St., Peterborough, Ontario, and being on the northeast corner of Burnham and James Streets.

Legal description: All and singular that certain parcel or tract of land and premises situate, lying and being in the City of Peterborough, in the County of Peterborough and Province of Ontario, and being composed of the whole of Lots Numbers ONE and TWO north of James Street and east of Burnham Street according to Registered plan ONE "A" for the said City of Peterborough SAVE AND EXCEPT thereout the northerly thirty-five feet from front to rear of said Lot number TWO and SUBJECT TO a right-of-way in common with the owners of the lots abutting thereon through, over, upon and along that part of said Lots Numbers one and two, more particularly described as follows:

Commencing at a point in the southern boundary of Lot Number ONE and easterly one hundred and twenty-two feet from the south west angle thereof;

Thence northerly at right angles to the said southern boundary of said Lot Number ONE to a point distant southerly from the northern limit of said Lot Number TWO, thirty five feet;

Thence westerly and parallel to the northern limit of said Lot Number TWO, twelve feet;

Thence southerly along a line parallel to the eastern boundary of the herein described right-ofway to the southern limit of Lot Number ONE;

Thence easterly twelve feet along the southern limit of Lot Number ONE to the place of beginning. (Number 144259, Sept.23, 1964)

Date of construction: 1876-1877

Owner: Mrs. Martha Ann Kidd

Significance:

The Pines" is a good example of the Victorian Tuscan Villa style of architecture as it developed in this area. The setting of wide lawns and the verandah which still encircles three sides of the house are features rare in our city. The original owner, Harry Cassady Rogers, was Postmaster and a leading figure in the military life of Peterborough for many years. He was also the first president of the Peterborough Historical Society.

Historical background:

The acre of land on which "The Pines" was built was originallyy the property of the Hon. Zacheus Burnham, Harry C. Roger's father in-law. Although others may have held title to the property after 1856, H.C. Rogers became the owner in 1863, but it was not until 1876-77 that he built his house. He called it "The Pines" because the property was covered with virgin white pines of which one still remains. The house was built in the local version of the Tuscan Villa style of Victorian Italianate architecture, which prevailed in Peterborough in the 1870's. It remained the home of the Harry Rogers family until 1903. In the intervening years before the present owner acquired the property in 1964 it was owned by William F. Nelson, Frederick J.A. Hall (Deputy Sheriff), Peter A. Ferguson, Louis Yeotes and William Tinker. The north thirty-five feet of the property was sold for a building lot in 1914. The house remains much as it was when erected over a hundred years ago. The only exterior changes are the heavy posts which replaced the slim posts which held up the encircling verandah and the removal of the window shutters and the belvedere railing on the roof.

Lieut. Col. Harry Cassady Rogers was born in 1839 at Grafton, Ontario the second son of James C. Rogers (1804-1874) and Maria, the 3rd daughter of the Hon. Zacheus Burnham. He received his education in Toronto and then came to Peterborough to work in the store of his uncle, Robert David Rogers. Later he formed a partnership with H.T. Strickland, first in a dry good store and later in lumber business. In 1871 he was appointed Postmaster of Peterborough and held that position until he resigned in 1909. He was connected with military matters, in several arms of the service.

In 1855 he enlisted in the Peterborough Rifle Company and went to the front as Lieut. During Fenian Raid troubles. When the 57th Battalion was organized the Rifle Company became Number ONE Company and Capt. H.C. Rogers was in command. In 1872 he retired from infantry command and raised ”C" Troop of Cavalry, taking command as Captain. In 1877 he received the rank of Lieut. Col. In 1895, on Col. Bonton's retirement; Lieut. Col. Rogers took command of the Dragoons until his retirement in 1899. He was actively involved with many local societies, particularly with the Horticultural Society and the Historical Society, of which he was the first president. He was also an early president of the Ontario Historical Society. After his retirement the family moved to Victoria, B.C.

Exterior description for designation by-law:

The structure is 2 storeys in height, of solid white brick construction, with a rubble stone foundation and a partial basement. The style is based on the local version of a Tuscan Villa as expressed by the Victorian Italianate architecture of the period. The house is basically square in plan but has a two storey projection the depth of the verandah to the left of the centre front entrance. The verandah extends from this projection across the front of the house and around the south side and back to the rear entrance. The verandah's original wide segmental wood arches, brackets and simple capitols remain; but the slender chamfered posts have been replaced by heavy bulbous posts on brick piers.

On the first floor a plinth encircles the building except when broken by window and door openings. The centre entrance is very elaborate. The two leaf door, flanked by side and transom lights, is set into an opening segmental in shape at the top and finished with a brick label head surround. Wood trim, carved to resemble twisted rope, and small brackets also decorate the entrance. To the left of this entrance, at the front of the two storey projection, is a one storey rectangular bay which contains four double hung sash lights and two string courses. To the right of the front entrance is a floor length double hung sash window the top of which is segmental in shape with a brick label head surround. originallyy the long lower sash could be raised to give a door height access from the house to the verandah. On the south side is another of these floor length windows and a bay with a two leaf door and double hung side light windows. On the rear, or east side the simple centre door is now hidden by an attached garage. To its right is a door with a transom at the end of the verandah which terminates at the garage. At the left side is a window. Two windows break the wall surface on the north side. All these windows have segmental tops, label head surrounds and double hung sashes. A string course around the building terminates the first storey.

The second storey has three windows on each of the west, south and north sides. On the rear or east side the centre is dominated by a large, beautiful Romanesque style round top window with decorative etched and coloured glass panes. There is one narrow window to its right. With the exception of the Romanesque window all second storey windows have segmental shaped tops with brick label head surrounds tied together by a string course. All the windows, including those on the first storey, have lug sills with small brackets. The low truncated hip roof is broken by four chimneys. One has a single stack and three have double stacks. Three dormers, gable in shape, each with a round top double hung sash window, are set into the rear or east roof between two of the double stack chimneys. The roof on the north side is broken by a gable with a round top double hung sash window. The fact that the dormers and gable occur only on the rear and north sides, gives the structure the appearance of a two storey house from the street sides.

Brief prepared by Martha Ann Kidd

309 Engleburn Ave

Location: The lands and buildings, known municipally as 309 Engleburn Avenue, being the first house facing Engleburn Avenue on the north side, west of Burnham Street. All and singular and certain parcel or tract of land and premises situate, lying and being in the City of Peterborough, in the county of Peterborough and Province of Ontario and being composed of part of Block A on Plan 1A and listed as having a frontage on 83.77 feet. It is in Ward 4, Sub. 110, No. 179

Owners and occupants: John Philip Tighe and Mary Isabel Tighe

Architect and builder: Unknown

Date of construction: 1854

Significance:

The Rev. Mark Burnham had the house built for his steward, Absalom Ingram, and for 110 years it was occupied by three generations of the Ingram family. When first erected it was a typical storey and a half frame house with gable ends and a centre door in the three bay facade. About 1896 the roof was raised and a full second storey was inserted with such skill that the pleasing modified Georgian appearance of the house was retained.

Site and description:

Located at the north-east corner of the former large Burnham Estate, it did duty as the gatehouse for the property. Today, it is set quite close to the street on a level piece of land. Until the mid 1970's, when the corner property was sold, the large lawn extended on the east side to Burnham Street with a long sidewalk bisecting this lawn and leading to the east porch and entrance. A huge birch tree, planted in the early 1900's, still graces the remaining portion of the east lawn. To the west is a deep ravine which is the dry bed of a stream which used to empty into the Otonabee River. The property was formerly in an urban area of Otonabee Township, located across the river from the Village of Peterborough and known as Scotch Village or Peterborough East. This area was incorporated as the Village of Ashburnham in 1858 and was annexed to the City of Peterborough in 1904.

Historical background:

For the greater part of its history, this dwelling was owned by Absalom Ingram and two generations of his descendants. Mr. Absalom Ingram was born in England on September 25, 1828; he died in Peterborough, Ontario on February 8, 1896.

His first wife was Margaret Alexander, of Scottish descent, born in England on March 13, 1831; she died on March 13, 1831, at the age of 26 years.

Two daughters were born of this marriage:

1. Amelia Elizabeth born October 27th 1852; died June 20, 1892.

2. Margaret, born August 22, 1854; died November 29, 1937.

Absalom's second wife was Mary Davis, born in 1825; died 1899. They were married either in Lakefield or Peterborough.

Before coming to Peterborough in 1853, Absalom Ingram had worked for Rev. Mark Burnham in St. Thomas, Ontario. Family tradition says that Rev. Mark Burnham had gone to Montreal to meet Mr. Ingram when he emigrated from England, but whether they had known each other prior to this meeting is unknown. In Peterborough, Mr. Ingram was steward for the large Burnham Estate.

For nearly a year the Ingrams lived in the Burnham house, built in 1853, until their frame house was completed in the summer of 1854. Mr. Ingram's grandson, Mr. Alex Butcher, relates the story that the carpenters had to stop work for a day when his mother was born in the house on August 22, 1854.

In 1865 Rev. Mark Burnham sold the house and land to Mr. Ingram for ₤l00-00-0. The deed for this transaction is now in the Archives of the Peterborough Centennial Museum.

When St. Luke’s Anglican Church, Ashburnham, was founded in 1876, Mr. Ingram was one of the eight men who attended the first Vestry meeting.

Mr. John Butcher, who became Mr. Ingram’s son-in-law, was born in Warminster, Wiltshire, England on May 15, 1850; he died in Peterborough, Ontario on January 13, 1937. He immigrated to Canada at the age of fourteen – in 1864 – and settled near Warsaw, Ontario. (A number of people from the Warminster area settled near Warsaw where there was a Warminster Cheese Factory). Mr. Butcher’s parents later followed him to Canada and settled near Beaverton, Ontario.

Mr. John Butcher eventually moved to Peterborough where he lived with Bob Scott in a house on the south side of Robinson Street, Ashburnham. His first employment was at Peck’s Brewery on Maria Street. He then was a teamster for Roger’s (later McAllister’s) Mill delivering four, oats, etc. to grocery stores.

John Butcher was an accomplished musician, playing several instruments: organ and piano; a violin in his own orchestra; a flute in a regimental band; a piccolo in parades. He also played the bells at St. John's Anglican Church and filled in at the organ when the regular organist was absent. (It is of interest to note that the present owner of the house, John Tighe, also plays the bell at St. John's Church). By 1893 John Butcher was listed in the Town Directory as a "Music Teacher".

There is a family story, told by Alex Butcher, that his father was asked by Absalom Ingram to teach his daughter, Margaret, to play the organ - so it was that John Butcher met his future wife. (The organ on which he was supposed to have given Margaret her lessons was given to the Peterborough Centennial Museum by their daughter, Mrs. John Scott.)

John Butcher and Margaret Ingram were married on September 30, 1874, in the Ingram home by the Rev. Mark Burnham. Their married life spanned 62 years until their deaths in 1937.

Mr. Butcher was confirmed at St. Luke's and received his first communion there. Later he became sexton of St. John’s Anglican Church, a position he held for fifty years, until 1921. He continued to ring the chimes until 1932.

After their marriage, Margaret and John moved to Auburn on Armour Road, north of Parkhill. They later moved to Rogers Street just south of Douro - probably at 486 Rogers Street.

Seven children were born to the John Butchers, one of whom was stillborn. The six living children were:

1. Margaret Louise, born April 13, 1876 in Auburn; died February 10, 1969 (age 92). She married John Scott and lived in New Liskard

2. Mary Adelaide, born August 27, 1878, on Rogers Street; died February 13, 1956

3. Clara Ingram, born February 21, 1881; died February 26, 1887.

4. Florence Amelia. born November 3, 1884; died March 22, 1956.

5. George Raymond born November 23, 1889; died in 1975.

6. Alexander Ingram, born May 2, 1894. Mr. Butcher is 86 years old at the present time (November, 1980).

In 1896 Absalom Ingram died and his daughter, Margaret, inherited his home. She and her husband, John, and their six children moved into the house at this time. Mr. Alex Butcher believes that this was when the extra storey was added to the house to accommodate john’s large family and Mr. Ingram's widow, who occupied the two downstairs rooms on the west side of the house.

The back wing, a two storey addition, was built about 1902. Alex Butcher remembers returning from school one day to see the original one storey wing moved back (to serve as a summer kitchen) and the cellar exposed. The new wing was built over the existing cellar by Alexander Fitzgerald.

Mr. Butcher also recollects traveling with his father and brother by horse and wagon to a farm where Gannon’s narrows meets Pigeon Lake and bringing back several large trees to plant. One of these is the large birch tree which still stands on the east lawn beside the house.

When Alex Butcher was married on September 13th, 1921 he and his wife moved into the south half of the brick double house on Burnham Street adjoining his father’s property. (This house was built in 1903 by Mr. Rutherford). The Butchers lived there until 1940 when their present house was built across the ravine on the west side of the Ingram house on land which was severed from the original Ingram property. Mr. Butcher still lives in this house with his daughter, Shirley.

Upon the deaths of Margaret and John Butcher in 1937, Alex Butcher, their youngest child, inherited the property. He rented the house until 1944 when it was purchased by Mr. & Mrs. Fred Holmes of 193 Aylmer Street who immediately sold it to their daughter and son-in-law, Mr. & Mrs. Edwin J. MacDonald. The Ingram-Butcher era ended with this sale.

The MacDonalds lived in the house for 28 years, until 1972. They made a number of changes to the structure. In the mid-40's the wooden verandah, which surrounded the main house on the west, south and east sides, was removed and a small porch was built over the main entrance. A glassed-in porch which covered the east door leading into the wing and the south door leading into the kitchen was replaced by another porch of the same dimensions. A clapboard shed was built where the original kitchen, which had been moved in 1902, had stood. (It is not known when this old kitchen was demolished). A small open porch which covered the west door to the newer kitchen was replaced by a large glassed-in porch in the late 1940's and this was later winterized.

Mrs. June Whiteman purchased the property from the MacDonalds in 1972, at which time most of the east lawn was sold as a separate lot on which a small bungalow was erected.

In 1976 Mr. & Mrs. John Tighe became the owners of the old Ingram house.

An interesting footnote about the house is that during its 126 year history it had six different addresses. First it was simply Lot 1, West Lake, North Sophia; then it was listed as merely being located on Lake Street, Ashburnham; when Ashburnham became part of Peterborough the address became 301 Burnham Street; some years later what used to be the private driveway into the Burnham Estate became Dale Avenue and the house was numbered 20 Dale Avenue; in 1965 Dale Avenue became Engleburn Avenue and the address became 306 Engleburn Avenue; lastly, in 1979 the even numbers were changed to odd numbers to correspond to the numbering plan of the rest of the city and the address became 309 Engleburn Avenue.

Exterior description for designation by-law:

This is a rectangular, two and a half storey three bay, modified Georgian dwelling with a centre door. It has a medium gable roof with return eaves at the gable ends. The house is of frame construction, sheathed with clapboard and more recently, sheathed with aluminum siding. There is a two storey addition projecting irregularly from the north, east corner of the house which was added about 1902 and which is in keeping with the style of the older structure. There is a two flue, single stack chimney of brick located in the middle of the roof ridge which is unusual for this area. The flat window openings have plain wood trim at the top and sides and lug sills at the bottoms. The attic windows still retain the original double hung sashes,  the top sash containing twelve panes of glass and the bottom one eight panes. The main entrance is flat in shape with plain wood trim at the top and sides. It contains a transom. The original verandah across the front and sides has been replaced with modern porches and a garage.

Brief Prepared by Mrs. Betty Hinton

565 Water St

Location and legal description:

All and singular that parcel or tract of land and premises situate, lying and being in the City of Peterborough, in the County of Peterborough and Province of Ontario, and being composed of part of Lot number two east of George and north of London Streets in the said City, according to Plan number 63 registered in the Registry Office for the Registry Division of Peterborough (#45), more particularly described as follows:

Commencing at the south east angle of the said Lot number 2;

Thence northerly along the easterly limit of the said lot, which is also the westerly limit of Water Street 102 feet.

Thence westerly parallel with the southerly limit of the said lot, which is also the northerly limit of London Street 110.96 feet more or less to a lane shown on Registered Plan number 63 for the said City of Peterborough;

Thence southerly parallel to the easterly limit of the said lot along the eastern limit of the said lane to the southerly limit of the said lot, which is also the northern limit of London Street.

Thence easterly along the southern limit of the said lot, which is also the northern limit of London Street to the place of beginning.

Together with an easement of right-of-way over, and the use forever of, together with others entitled thereto, the aforesaid lane as it appears on the aforesaid Plan made by Richard B. Rogers, Esq., P.L.S. and registered in the aforesaid Registry Office as Plan number 63 for the said City of Peterborough. (#385832)

Owners and occupants: The Canadian Red Cross Society

Architect: William Blackwell

Date of construction: 1888-1889

Site and setting:

The house is situated on the northwest corner of the intersection of Water and London Streets. The tree-shaded neighbourhood is composed of older homes of which 565 and its neighbour 570 directly across Water Street are, by far, the largest and establish the character of the area.

Significance:

This house, one of the grandest of its era in the city, was designed by the noted Peterborough architect William Blackwell early in his career. It is a notable example of the Queen Anne style and has many interesting exterior and interior features. Especially important is the magnificent stair hall. The historical and architectural significance of the building is much enhanced by the fact that it has undergone almost no alteration since its construction.

Historical background:

The Harstone House lies on part of the original halfacre lot granted on April .21, 1843 by the Crown to Elias Burnham. On April 16, 1847, Elias Burnham sold Lot 2 plus other land to the north to his relative George Burnham(#5910).

George Burnham built a large home just north of the present Harstone House site where he lived a number of years. On September 1, 1888, Burnham sold the halfacre lot to Isabell McWilliams, wife of John B. McWilliams. It was John B. McWilliams who, in 1888, bought plans for a magnificent house from local architect, William Blackwell. In 1888-1889, McWilliams erected 565 Water Street.

John B. McWilliams was a native of Belmont Township who came to Peterborough in 1857 and engaged in the carriage business. He was Deputy Sheriff in 1869, was appointed Justice of the Peace in 1886 and was a member of the Town Council and Board of Education for a number of years. He had many connections with the  management of forests, being appointed Crown Timber Agent for the Midland District in 1872, Superintendent of Woods and Forests of Ontario in 1894, and a member of the Commission of Forestry in 1897. He was a prominent member of the many local organizations. His son Roland McWilliams, Peterborough’s mayor in 1907, became Lieutenant-Governor of Manitoba in 1907. On March 16, 1907, John McWilliams sold the house to Phoebe Harstone of Peterborough. (#2333). Mrs. Harstone’s husband, Robert Harstone, was the owner and manager of agricultural property, especially in the west. Upon Mrs. Harstone's death, her son, Colonel John A. Harstone became the occupant of the house. Colonel Harstone was Deputy County Court Clerk in 1935, County Court Clerk in 1936 and commander of the Fourth Anti-Tank Battalion in 1940. In 1936, Colonel Harstone was also appointed as sheriff which he remained until he went overseas during World War II. In his absence, his sister Marion took over his duties. He resumed his duties upon his return to the city and remained as sheriff until 1962.

Colonel Harstone lived in the house until his death in the fall of 1981. On June 14, 1982, the Canadian Red Cross Society bought the house from the estate of Colonel Harstone and are presently setting it up for their use. (#385606).

The purchase serves as a fitting tribute to Mrs. Phoebe Harstone who, since 1914, was an active member of the Red Cross.

Exterior description of the building for designation by-law:

The two and one-half storey Queen Anne style house is built of solid red brick laid in stretcher bond. It rests on a plinth of four courses of brick capped by a course of moulded brick above a foundation of roughly coursed and dressed granite. The house is basically rectangular in plan, oriented east and west with its east facade facing Water Street. There are two short wings, extending from the northeast corner and from the northwest corner. A two-storey kitchen wing to the north is recessed from the front facade, and its rear wall is flush with the rear wing. In the corner where the main block meets the kitchen wing, there is a two-storey rectangular projection with a flat roof. The roof of the main block is steeply hipped, as are the lower roofs of the front gable and kitchen wing.

The rear wing has a gabled roof. A wide over hang-with fascia is supported on scrolled brackets. There are three tall chimneys, all of which are decorated with rectangular brick panelling. One, flush with the east wall, rises near the south corner of the front facade.

Another similar one is near the east corner of the north façade. The third rises between the main block and the kitchen wing.

There is a two and a half storey projecting bay on the front of the northeast wing whose gable has exposed curved half timbering to the eaves on either side of a central sash window. The stucco surface of the gable uses an aggregate of flints with some pieces of coloured glass. On each of the main storeys of the bay is a pair of tall sash windows, each sash containing a single pane, and each window surmounted by a transom-light containing stained glass. A similar window on the first floor on the south side of the wing is the only sash window in the main block without a transom-light. The window lintels are flat brick arches, and the sills are cut limestone.

Features to note on this bay are the string course two bricks high which continues the line of the window sills on the second floor around the bay, and the pattern in the brick below it, which is composed of two rows of brick in basket-weave pattern: The wall of the second storey extends slightly beyond that of the first above two supporting courses of moulded bricks.

A single storey porch extends from the front wing to the south corner of the front facade. It was built in 1908 to replace the original porch and represents the one major alteration to the house since its construction. The porch rests on a foundation of dressed limestone and the sloping roof is supported by four square brick piers with stone capitals. The piers rest on a brick balustrade with a stone coping. At the north end of the porch there is a projecting gable.

It is supported on square brick piers with stone capitals, which rest on larger limestone piers.

Cut and pressed stone buttresses shaped like inverted brackets or consoles carry out the transition. The gable is supported by a heavy beam decorated with modillions. There is a rough stucco surface between the vertical half-timbering.

Above the porch gable and attached to the wing's south wall is a small sunroom framed in wood. Its roof is flat and the eaves are carried on scrolled brackets.

The five casements, three on the front and two on the side, each have smallpaned transoms. This room was part of the original structure although the present porch was not.

The main steps lead to the double entrance doors. Each door has a square panel below and a large vertical glass pane above. The doorway is surmounted by a transom-light of stained glass incorporating the house number. Between the door and south corner of the facade under the porch are two windows with small square leaded panes and heavy stone lintels and sills.

The south facade has a projecting bay at the east similar to the bay on the east facade. There are no windows in the north facade between the south and kitchen wing. However, there are windows on each side of the rectangular projection on the second floor. On the first floor there is an arched opening on its east side and a door on the north. There is a large gabled dormer between the north chimney and the roof of the kitchen wing. Near the south corner of the rear facade there is a projecting bay similar to the other bays. The gabled end of the northern wing is very like the bays,except that on its first storey there is one large window rather than two narrower ones. There are windows on each storey on its southern side, each with a stained glass transom. The windows on the facade of the rear wing are the only ones in the house with wooden sills.

Between the wing and the bay at the rear is a narrow one-storey porch. Its flat roof with a bellcast edge is decorated with cast iron cresting and is supported by turned wooden posts. Between the tops of the posts is a spool-work screen.

Above the porch are two tall pointed-arched windows containing stained glass.Between and above them is' a round stained glass window. There is a large central gabled dormer containing two sash windows and having a surface of flints and some coloured glass.

Interior description of the central stair hall for designation by-law:

The central stair hall is entered through a small vestibule from the front door. The inner door is also a double door, with square panels below; above on each panel are stained glass lights with designs of young women. The doorway is surmounted by a transom of clear glass with a border etched in the Greek key motif.

On the first floor the hall is approximately twelve feet wide and twenty-one and one-half feet deep. The first flight of the double return staircase rises in the middle of the hall to a landing across the back of the hall from each end of which the return flights rise to the second floor.

The hall extends on either side of the lower flights to two small doors, one on each side. On both north and south walls of the hall there are two double doors leading to the living and reception rooms. The ceiling has a heavy moulded plaster cornice, and there is a moulded plaster medallion around the light fixture.

The doors have five panels surrounded by moulding, one horizontal top panel, two long vertical middle panels and two shorter vertical bottom panels. The architraves are carved cherry with a pattern of foliage and stylized sunbursts.

The carved corner blocks and reeded trim are finely painted to / resemble cherry, as is all of the other woodwork in the hall, with the exception of the balustrade and newel posts, which are cherry. There is a cherry-grained panelling on either side of the lower flight of stairs and on the underside of the upper flights. The landing is dominated by the tall arched windows with stained glass and the small round stained glass window between and above them. Below the round window is a niche made to contain a grandfather clock in varnished cherry, which was presumably made for the house in New Brunswick in 1889. Its pendulum is engraved with the name of J.B. McWilliams.

The cherry balustrade on either side of the lower flight continues on the inner sides of the upper flights and is linked on the second floor in a U between the two upper flight. The balustrade is composed of a handrail- supported by alternating square vertical and horizontal reeded members and turned spindles.

There are turned newel posts at the landing and in the upper hall. The latter also have turned pendants. The large newel posts in the lower hall, set obliquely to the balustrade, are square in section, with panels and mouldings.

Each is surmounted by a bronze statuette of a knight holding a lance topped by a triple electric light fixture.

The upstairs hall measures eleven by twelve feet. Towards the front is a double sliding door, on the south two doors with, transoms leading to bedrooms, and on the north one door to a bedroom and an arched opening to a corridor. The details of the doors resemble those on the main floor and the woodwork is again finely done in imitation cherry. The door head surrounds here are not carved cherry.

565-569 Harvey St

Location and legal description: The building is known municipally as 565-569 Harvey St. Those lands and premises located in the following municipality, namely, in the City of Peterborough, in the County of Peterborough and the Province of Ontario, and being composed of part of Lt. 2, east of Water and north of London Street, more particularly described as follows:

Commencing at the south east corner of the said Lot.

Thence westerly along southerly boundary of said Lot 70 feet 3 inches parallel to the northerly limit of the said Lot;

Thence northerly 98 feet 3 inches parallel to the easterly limit of the said Lot;

Thence easterly in a line parallel to the eastern limit of the said Lot;

Thence southerly along the eastern limit of the said Lot to the place of beginning. (Instrument # J89527)

Date of construction: Pre-1861 Addition- 1875-1879

Site and setting:

565-569 Harvey Street is situated on the northwest corner of Harvey and London Streets. The house is bordered by London Street to the south, Harvey Street to the east, Harvey Street residences to the north and London Street residences to the west.

Significance:

One of the older dwellings in this area, 565-569 Harvey Street is representative of the type of cottage inhabited by craftsmen living in Peterborough between 1860 and 1880. Its stack plank walls and hand hewn roof construction makes it especially unique. The front doorway and French doors add a touch of architectural elegance to this simple early cottage.

Historical background:

Research regarding the property Lot 2 North London, East Hater indicates it was, in 1843, part of a Crown Land Grant. The title search revealed that George Mills, freeholder, owned this land in 1850 and sold 1/8 acre (Part 2) to James Miller, blacksmith, for 109-17-6. On October 22, 1860, a mortgage was registered from Mills to Miller from this date or thereabouts until March 10, 1865. The price of this property surely tells one that a house stood on this lot at this time. The census of 1861 list James Miller, blacksmith 23, Margaret, wife 22, and son Andrew 2 living in a frame one-storey house. This frame structure appears to be the building now registered as 569 Harvey street.

This house can also be seen on the map of 1875, at this time the southerly portion of the house does not appear. Instead, there can be seen a long building extending from the front of the property facing Harvey Street well back onto the lot. This is, no doubt, the house with an attached shed, or sheds, of some description.

On November 27, 1872, Miller, blacksmith, sold the house for $1,300. The map indicates that this house belonged to John Finlay. The land deed is registered in the name of Letitia Finlay, John's second daughter by his second marriage.

Letitia Finlay married Malcolm R. Kidd, school teacher, in 1874 and they likely moved into this house at this time or soon afterwards. Professor Garth Kidd, Assistant Dean of Graduate Studies, University of Western Ontario, reports that his great grandfather, Howard Finlay Kidd, also a teacher, was born in this house. Howard Finlay was born November 16, 1877. Howard Finlay was the first son of Letitia and Malcolm. Their second son was born on July 2, 1879 and died in 1890 by drowning in the Otonabee River. Professor Kidd felt certain that his great grandfather was born in this house and shortly after the southerly section was constructed. He guessed this likely occurred between 1875-1879. Precisely when this second portion was built (now number 569), a storey and a half, is difficult to say.

One would suspect Professor Kidd's estimate to be relatively accurate. At the time of building this portion it is likely that the entire structure was bricked over. The rear of 569 indicates a small area without this brick clad surface. Now this small section is stack plank covered with insul-brick.

Photographs of this house in the mid-1920's shows a porch similar to the one presently there, likely with lattice at each end. These photographs all indicate a large wooden drive shed which extended from the west side of 569 almost to the edge of the lot, this would explain the lack of detail as well as the low maintenance level of the west wall of this dwelling.

The next time the house appeared in the title was in 1938 in the estate of Martha Letitia (Finlay) Kidd. In her will, she left this house to her son Howard Finlay Kidd, who, in turn, on June 7, 1950 transferred its ownership to his daughter-in-law Gladys Kidd for $3,000. , Gladys Kidd states that she has never been in the house but rented it with the assistance of resident caretakers, who maintained the property. This couple occupied the north part of the house for many years, having cared for Martha Kidd in her declining years. Gladys Kidd, a resident of Brandon, Manitoba, sold 565-569 Harvey Street to Kenneth Bodnar for $18,000; he was another absentee landlord.

Mr. Bodnar owned the property for eight years during which time it deteriorated to some degree. On October 1, 1982, the property was purchased by Mary Steele Thomas for $23,000. A first mortgage held by Mrs. Kidd was transferred at this time.

With the renumbering of the houses in this area in 1900, number 45 Harvey Street, Lot 2 E. Water, N. London, became number 565. The number 569 must have occurred when the house was divided for occupancy of two families. Gladys Kidd stated that this happened when Martha Kidd was an elderly woman. She required assistance to be close at hand and the caretakers lived in 569 While she (Martha Kidd) maintained her residence in 565. A doorway still is in evidence between the adjoining walls behind plaster on one side and wood veneer panelling on the other.

This research is based upon searching the title of the property, reading the census of 1857, 1861 and 1871, the assessment rolls from 1852 to 1874 and telephone conversations with members of the Kidd family whose ancestors lived at this address and other information given by neighbours residing in this area from as early as 1914. Family members included Mrs. Gladys Kidd, her brother-inlaw L.F. Kidd of Winnipeg and her son Professor Garth Kidd.

1066 Armour Rd

Location and legal description:

The building is known municipally as 1066 Armour Rd. and is located in the City of Peterborough, in the County of Peterborough and in the Province of Ontario...being composed of part of Block G according to and shown upon registered Plan 12G for said city formerly Township of Douro more particularly: commencing at a point in the South limit of said Block G at a distance of 5.67 feet from the S.W. angle thereof;

Thence N. 88 degrees 45 minutes E. 251.5 feet

Thence N. 5 degrees 24 minutes E. 450.341 feet

Thence N. 1 degree 50 minutes E. 20.0 feet

Thence N. 88 degrees 10 minutes W. 10.0.feet

Thence N. 1 degree 50 minutes E. 332.53 feet

Thence S. 72 degrees 37 minutes W. 95.20 feet

Thence S. 7 degrees 48 minutes E. 23.37 feet

Thence s. 60 degrees 03 minutes 40 seconds W. 279.0 feet

Thence s. 7 degrees 10 minutes 40 seconds E. 430.99 feet to a point marking the beginning of a curve to the right of radius of 1942.86 feet and chord of 95.91 feet S. 5 degrees 45 minutes 48 seconds east, a distance of 95.92 feet to the place of the beginning. (Instrument # 208977)

Site and setting:

The James Blackwell House is located at 1066 Armour Road in the northeast section of Peterborough, formerly Douro Township. The property is bordered to the west by Armour Road, to the east and north by fields and to the south by the Peterborough Golf and Country Club.

Significance:

The house is an excellent example of the Regency style of architecture and still maintains its original form of outside covering. It was built for James Blackwell and his wife Frances on a piece of land originallyy obtained by Mrs. Blackwell's father Robert Reid, one of Douro Township's first settlers. Mrs. Blackwell was also a niece of Thomas A. Stewart. Born in the house was William Blackwell who became one of the foremost architects in the Peterborough area during the late 1800's and early 1900's.

Date of construction: Pre - 1850

Style of Architecture: Regency

Owners and occupants: J.E. and M.F. Laycock

Historical background:

1066 Armour Road stands on a piece of land originallyy obtained from the Crown by Robert Reid in 1822, one of Douro Township's first settlers and a brother in-law of Thomas A. Stewart. James Blackwell came from England in 1815 and settled first with his father in Ops Township near Lindsay and then moved on to Douro Township.

During the late 1840's and early to mid 1850's he obtained several tracts of land from Reid and subsequently set up a very successful farm. Upon his marriage to Reid's youngest daughter Frances in the early 1840's, Blackwell built the impressive home now known as 1066 Armour Road. Also built were a number of sheds. The buildings stood on what was then lot 4, concession 11 of Douro Township according to James Reid's survey map of 1872.

Several children were born to the Blackwells in the house, perhaps the most noteworthy being William Blackwell born in 1850. William Blackwell studied architecture with his first cousin Walter Strickland in Toronto and worked for several years on the Canadian prairies upon receiving his degree.

It was there that he met his wife, the English born Annie Hales, whom he married in 1884. In that year he returned to Peterborough to establish a practise and began the construction of his Benson Avenue home. His architectural achievements in - Peterborough include the Harstone House at 565 Water Street, now the property of the Canadian Red Cross Society and the Sullivan House at 83 Robinson Street in Ashburnham. William Blackwell died in 1937 leaving his son Walter Blackwell to continue the family tradition of fine architectural achievements.

Walter Blackwell's works include some of the additions to the County Court House and to St. John's Anglican Church and Parish House. \ The house at 1066 Armour Road remained in the Blackwell family for a number of generations. Upon the death of James Blackwell on September 7, 1917, the house and part of the land were-sold to Robert Blackwell for $250.00. Upon Robert Blackwell' death in 1935, the house was sold to Frank R. Blackwell, Thomas J. Blackwell, Ivy L. Baths and Alice Wilson for $1.00 (#8189). Four months later on June 29, 1935 they sold it to Ella A. Earle for $2800.00. (#8219). Upon the death of Mrs. Earle in 1969, the house was inherited by her daughter, Mona F. Laycock on April 1, 1970. Mrs. Laycock and her husband reside in the house today. (#208977) On May 6, 1965, the Ontario Municipal Board ordered that certain parts of Douro Township, including the area containing the house, be annexed by the City of Peterborough. It was then that the address became 1066 Armour Road. (#163424). Over the years 1066 Armour Road has retained much of the charm it boasted upon its construction more than a century ago. It still retains the original form of exterior cover and remains a quaint sit on the scenic route via River Road.

Exterior description of building for designation by-law:

This storey and a half, stucco clad frame house is rectangular in shape with a gable roof. A centre gable breaks the roof line on the west side and a storey and a half kitchen wing is attached to the east side. The two bay main facade is on the south gable end. The ground floor has an entrance with side and transom lights and a four panel door, and a French door. There are two six over six pane double hung sash windows on the upper storey. The west side has two floor length windows - like French doors - on the ground storey  which are symmetrically placed on either side of the centre gable which breaks the roof line and contains six over six double hung sash windows. The north side has two windows on the ground storey with two slightly smaller windows above them on the upper storey.

All have six over six pane double hung sashes. Board and batten sheds are attached to the north side of the kitchen wing. There are two chimneys, one located in the center of the roof edge of the house and the other in the centre of the gable end of the kitchen wing. The verandah across the main facade is now enclosed.

1154 Armour Rd

Legal description:

All and Singular, that certain parcel or tract of land ,and premises, situate, lying and being in the City of peterborough, in the County of Peterborough and Province of Ontario and being composed of Lot number 9 according to Registered Plan 12G, designated as Part 1 on Plan 45R3177. (Instrument # 345140).

Date of construction: Late 1840's or early 1850's.

Significance:

The house was built and inhabited by James Reid who was a nephew of one of Douro's first settlers, Thomas A. Stewart. The construction follows a style used by the Stewart and Reid families in which vertical logs were placed into sills at the top and bottom. However, 1154 Armour Road is unique since planks instead of logs were used in its construction.

Site and setting:

1154 Armour Road is in the northeast section of the city in what was once part of Douro Township. It is bordered to the west by Armour Road, by field and trees to the south and east and by an Armour Road residence to the north.

Historical background:

The James Reid House (1154 Armour Road) stands on a lot of land originallyy obtained by Robert Reid in 1822. In that year, the 56 year old Reid and his brother-in-law Thomas Alexander Stewart became the first settlers of the then un-surveyed Douro Township. Coming from Ireland with their families (Reid and his wife Maria had six daughters and three sons while Stewart and his wife Francis had three small daughters),the two were furnished with letters of introduction to Lieutenant Governor Maitland of Upper Canada who, at York, granted Reid and Stewart 1200 acres each in the unbroken township of Douro. Reid's acreage was later increased to 2000 acres and the lands were finally patented to them in 1848. Both men were of the class and gentry that the government wanted in the new areas to balance the republican and rebellious influences from the United States.

In September, Reid and Stewart visited Douro, stopping along the way at Rice Lake to speak with surveyor Richard Birdsall and, according to Mrs. Stewart's diary, the two men were enthusiastic about their future in the backwoods. On returning to Cobourg, Stewart became ill and the task of transporting the families, servants and furniture from York to Cobourg fell to Robert Reid. He continued on with his sons to Douro where he had eighteen men working on two winter shelters, some of them Smith Township volunteers. When Stewart arrived with the families on February 10, 1823 the houses were almost ready for occupancy. The Stewart home was a four room log cabin promptly named "Auburn" while the Reid house, located a half mile north, was an open front shanty. (See Appendix 1). Mrs. Stewart reported that the Reids found their shanty quite healthy except for the times the howling winds outside caught the sparks of the fire and "set fire to their bedding while they slept".

In May 1823, Richard Birdsall surveyed the township and assessed that the Reid house stood on lot # 4, concession 12 of Douro. At this time the Reid children were still in Douro.

James Reid was a public land surveyor and lived for many years on the family property. After a number of years on the family land, John Reid, also a land surveyor, moved into a roughcast house that stood near the eastern limit of the Nicholls Oval, facing Armour Road. It had been standing many years before being rented by Mr. Reid from Samuel Dickson. Eliza Reid eventually married Dr. John  McNabb and after living a short time in Douro, moved to Otonabee Township and then to Peterborough. Ann Reid married Ivan O'Beirne who later bought a lot north of the Reid house. Eventually Ivan O'Beirne's successful career as a lawyer took he and his wife to Peterborough. Mary Reid later married Colonel Samuel Strickland, the brother of Catherine Parr Traill and Susanna Moodie. It was Colonel Strickland who founded and helped build the present village of Lakefield. Frances Reid eventually married James Blackwell who farmed on the lot next to the Reids. Several generations of Blackwells lived in Douro and later went on to become prominent in the field of architecture. The Reids only had one other child after coming to Douro. Henry Reid, born in 1824, was the first male white child to be born in Douro.

Robert Reid led a respected life in Douro acting as a Justice of the Peace and later becoming County Auditor. During the Rebellion of 1837, Reid and Stewart led a company of their neighbours to Toronto, but arrived after it had ended.

When he died in 1856 at the age of 84, he left his home and acreage to his son James. Many delightful stories of Robert Reid's life in Douro exist to the present day. One of the most popular tells of Reid, a large burly man who formerly ran a woollen mill in his native Belfast, carrying his broken logging chain to Port Hope for repairs. Many such pioneer hardships Mr. Reid is said to have overcome with manly vigour and perseverance. Robert Reid was also one of the principal entertainers of Sir Peregrine Maitland on his visit as Governor in 1826.

It is difficult to ascertain when James Reid built what is now 1154 Armour Road. The construction style suggests the late 1840's. However, Robert Reid's last will and testament of 1856 arranged for money to be left to James "to build a new dwelling house and offices”. One can only say that the house was built sometime during either the late 1840's or early 1850's.

On August 20, 1877, James Reid sold the house and a few acres of land to William Spencley, a labourer who settled in Douro Township in 1865. (Instrument #1939). Spencley sold the house in 1900 to Elizabeth Gibson for $200.00 (Instrument #4864)who then sold it back to him on December 6, 1902 for the same amount. (Instrument #5205). On October 20, 1906, William Spencley sold 1154 Armour Road to one of its most prominent owners, William G. Morrow. A Peterborough native, Mr. Morrow was Vice-President and Managing Director of the Toronto Savings and Loan Company and President of the Peterborough Lock Manufacturing Company. He also directed the Central Canada Loan and Savings Company and the Imperial Life Assurance Company. He was a member of City Council for 1907, 1908 and 1909, Mayor in 1910, Chairman of the Public Library Board for 1912 and 1913 and a long time member of the Peterborough Curling Club. Mr. Morrow rented the house to Archie and Nellie Windsor of Peterborough and in 1908 transferred ownership to the Toronto Savings and Loan Company. (Instrument # 8612). The Windsors bought the house from the Company in 1947 for $1200.00(Instrument # 9319). At this time Mr. Windsor worked as a driver for Peterborough Lumber.

On May 6, 1965, the Ontario Municipal Board ordered that certain parts of Douro Township, including the area containing the Windsor's home, be annexed to the City of Peterborough. It was then that the house address was changed from River Road to 1154 Armour Road, (Instrument #163424).

The last survey of the area was completed on November 9, 1978 by Thomas E. Lyons, Ontario Land Surveyor. On this survey, the house is part of Lot 9 on registered plan 12G, City of Peterborough.

Finally on March 26, 1979, the Windsors sold the house to the present owner, Mrs. Shirley Vidler of Peterborough (Instrument #345140). In immaculate condition, the James Reid House remains as a charming part of Peterborough's early history and a link with a number of the area's more noteworthy families.

One need only look at this quaint little home to be reminded of such names as Reid, Stewart, Strickland, O'Beirne and Blackwell, as well as a form of construction popular among the area's most prominent pioneers.

Description of building for designation by-law:

1154 Armour Road is constructed of vertical planks set into sills at the top and bottom. The planks measure four inches in thickness and vary from nine to eighteen and a half inches wide. They are set into a twelve inch sill which rests on a stone foundation. The floor joists are six by six inches and the ceiling joists which are set into slots cut out of the vertical plank walls measure two by eight inches.

The plan of the house is typical of the horizontal log and frame houses of the period. It is rectangular in shape with doors breaking the centre of the front and rear walls. Small windows flank the door on the front facade. There is a small window near the front on the right side and another near the rear on the left side.

The interior is divided into one large room entered by the two doors with two small rooms, divided by a staircase opening of this large room on the right. The ceiling is 7 feet high on this large first floor.

The front door opens onto a small porch supported by two wooden columns. The door on the north facade opens onto a long verandah also supported by columns.

Old Pump House at Riverview Park and Zoo (1230 Water St)

Heritage Designation Brief - 1230 Water St

Bylaw 1983-51

2235 Keene Rd

Location and legal description:

The building is known municipally as Burnham Mansion: All and Singular that certain parcel or tract of land and premises situate, lying and being part of Lot 27, Concession 11, formerly in the Township of Otonabee, now in the City of Peterborough, County of Peterborough being designated as Part 1 on Plan registered in the Registry Office for the County of Peterborough as 45R 1291. (Instrument # 326306)

Site and setting:

Burnham Mansion is located in the northeastern section of Peterborough, formerly Otonabee Township. It is bordered to the south by Highway #7 (Trans-Canada Highway), to the west by Television Road, to the east by Mark S. Burnham Park property and to the north by privately owned property.

Owner and occupant: Burnham Mansion is owned by Mr. George Nicolaides who operates under the name of Burnham Steakhouse Inc. The building is currently being used as a restaurant.

Date of construction: 1873

Style of architecture: Simple Italianate

Architect: Although yet to be proven, Burnham Mansion may have been designed by Walter Strickland, nephew of pioneer authoresses Catherine Parr Traill and Susanna Moodie. The simple Italianate structure follows his style of design and records show that although he kept his residence in Toronto, he advertised and carried on many projects in the Peterborough area.

Significance:

Possibly designed by Walter Strickland, nephew of Susanna Moodie and Catherine Parr Traill, Burnham Mansion was built for Zaccheus Burnham Jr., a son of Reverend Mark Burnham and grandson of the Honourable Zaccheus Burnham Sr. For many years it was the home of Mark S. Burnham, namesake of the Mark S. Burnham Park. Built in a simple Italianate design, the house still has its original library wing.

Historical background:

The history of this impressive old home goes back to February 28, 1830 when the Crown patented the 200 acres comprising lot # 27 concession 11 of Otonabee Township to Zaccheus Burnham Sr. of the Cobourg area. In September 1858, the land was released to Burnham's son, Reverend Mar~ Burnham, who was by that time settled in the village of Ashburnham and acting as rector of St. John's Anglican Church. It was Reverend Burnham who would eventually build the house now known as Burnham Mansion for his son Zaccheus Burnham Jr. Born in 1840 in St. Thomas, Ontario, Zaccheus Burnham junior moved with his family to Ashburnham the 1852 where he lived at “Engleburn” the gracious Burnham family home on the eastern bank of the Otonabee River (Now 260 Engleburn Ave.). Coming from a highly prominent family, his father was a well respected clergyman, his brother, John, a lawyer and member of parliament and his brother George a doctor and Board of Education member. It appeared early that capital Zaccheus was the most "Burnham Mansion" – RR#8 Peterborough, Ontario adventurous of the Burnhams and had trouble deciding on a career. In his early years he was sent to school in Quebec, either Bishops College or Lower Canada, but was soon dismissed. Reverend Burnham subsequently sent family friend Absalom Ingram to Quebec to find Zaccheus and bring him back to Ashburnham. In 1860 Zaccheus set out with his maternal cousin to find gold in California but returned penniless in 1870. The only memento of his California adventure was a magenta coloured paper pass on the Carson City - Nevada Railway written in Chinese script.

In an effort to settle their son down from his adventures, the Burnhams used part of the fortune accumulated by the first Zaccheus Burnham to establish him as a gentleman farmer and raiser of purebred Jersey cattle in Otonabee township.

Reverend Burnham sold 150 acres of the original 200 acre lot to his son on September 27, 1871 for $1.00 (#812). Zaccheus bought the other 50 acres in 1878 from a Reverend Gough for $4140. 00 (#1992). In 1872, he married Martha Stewart Fowlis, a niece of the Honourable Thomas A. Stewart. They would eventually have five children: Mark Stanley Burnham; Thomas Burnham; George Burnham; Florence Burnham and; Anne Burnham.

originallyy called "Engleburn Farm", the homestead was built in 1873. It is difficult to pin down the architect. The simple Italianate design and decorative eave bricking point to Walter Strickland, a Toronto architect and nephew of pioneer authoresses Catherine Parr Traill and Susanna Moodie. At that time, Strickland's practise was at a peak and the Peterborough Examiner and Review show that he advertised and carried on many projects in the Peterborough area.

It is interesting to note that the house still maintains the original library wing built at the time of construction and has had only a few additions to the back. The original chimneys and most of the original verandah are still intact.

Tired of farming, Zaccheus sold his stock in 1884 and ceased to actively engage himself as a farmer. He did however keep a few animals for the purpose of fairs and exhibitions and was known throughout the area as a raiser of many winning cattle. Reasonably well off, he built a second home at Crowes Landing on upper Stoney Lake. The home is now a luxury resort known as "Burnham Lodge" and for many years was run by Zaccheus' daughter Florence.

As an interesting note, Zaccheus Barnum was also a witness during a local murder trial which the CBC included last year in their special about Canadian trials.

The Burnham children each did very well. Thomas went to Fort Frances where he had a hardware store. George married Gertrude Kendry and later became a mining engineer. Anne married George Nicholls and, as already mentioned, Florence looked after the home at Crowes Landing. She never married. When Zaccheus Burnham was attacked and killed by one of his prize bulls in 1913, his eldest son Mark Stanley Burnham remained at the farm to look after his mother and unmarried sister. Upon his father's death Mark Burnham inherited the farm and did not marry until after the death of his mother some years later. At mid-life he married Mary Erskine and had no children.

Mark S. Burnham turned the family property into a working farm again. A series of resident managers supervised farm operations and were paid on a share basis from profits in addition to receiving free garden and orchard produce, milk and firewood. Profits were not high and managers came and went. The original farm specialized in breeding purebred Jerseys. A large beaver marsh supplied sheep fodder and hay for the manufacturing of mattresses. Two large pastures and a creek sustained the cattle and less than 100 acres were under cultivation. The large woodlot supplied fuel as did a smaller 12 acre lot near the manager's house. When Mark Burnham died in 1953 the farm continued to be operated by Mrs. Burnham on a share basis until her death in 1966. The woodlot to the east of the house was donated by Mrs. Burnham in memory of her husband and is known today as the Mark S. Burnham Park.

The house and several acres of the west half of the lot were sold October 19, 1966 by Mrs. Burnham's executors, Alexander Fleming and Alexander Roberts, to Roy K. Irwin, John E. Lowes, Frederick B. Sargent, Louis K. Shaw and Helen Shaw (#164965). They sold it the following year to Ford Plumbing and Heating Company Limited for $87,500.00 (#179968).

For a number of years the house remained vacant until September 17, 1974 when it was bought by Frank R. Tsapralis bought a share and the two turned it into a restaurant. On December 5, 1977 they sold it to George Nicolaides who operates under the name of Burnham Steakhouse Incorporated. (#326306). The building is now a beautiful restaurant, maintaining much of the original decor.

In honour of the Burnham family, it is known as Burnham Mansion with only a new kitchen wing added to the back and new entrance at the front, it is still every bit as stately and impressive as the day the Burnham family moved in more than 100 years ago.

Exterior description of building for designation by-law:

Burnham Mansion follows a simple brick two storey Italianate style with a hipped roof and projecting corner library wing. Quoin brick work decorates all the corners and a row of corbell stringwork beneath a row of brick dentils runs around the house under the eaves as a cornice. The upper storey contains round topped sash windows on the south, east and west facades and the ground floor contains plain topped sash windows on all sides. Some of the windows are of contemporary stained glass A two storey projecting wing on the north side contains six symmetrically placed small paned windows on the east and west sides and a small upper story window at the back.

The front facade of the house contains a roof dormer with a roundtopped, small-paned, stained glass window as well as a two storey bay projecting from the hip-roofed library wing. The front door is situated to the west of the library wing and an original treillage verandah with an awning style roof surrounds the main body of the house on the front and east facades. Only the verandah floor has been replaced. The east and west facades each contain an upper and lower storey window while the north facade contains two upper and two lower storey windows. Two sets of symmetrically paired chimneys extend from the main roof while one extends from the library wing. Because Burnham Mansion houses a business it is possible that future additions may be made to the back. However, they will not harm the structure or appearance of the original home.

Confederation Square (501 George St N)

Location and Legal Description:

The lands and monuments are known municipally as Confederation Square. All the certain parcels or tracts of land and premises situate, lying and being in the City of Peterborough, in the County of Peterborough and Province of Ontario and being composed of Lots one and two on the south side of McDonnel1 Street and West of George Street and Lots one and two on the north side of Murray Street and west of George Street for the said City of Peterborough.

Owner: The Corporation of the City of Peterborough.

Date of creation: August 18, 1884

Site and setting:

 The park is situated in the central part of the city directly east of the Peterborough Armouries and Peterborough Collegiate and Vocational School. An iron fence separates those properties from the park. Confederation Square is also bound by Murray Street to the south, George Street to the east and McDonnell Street to the north.

Significance:

Since its Crown Patent in 1825, Confederation Square has remained for public use first as the town's only burial ground (1825 - 1851), then as an agricultural park (1875 - 1877) and finally as a park. With the War Memorial dedicated to the victims of the two World Wars which was designed by famed Canadian sculptor Walter Seymour Allward, the Brown Memorial from the 1885 Northwest Rebellion designed by local architect John E. Belcher and a granite representation of the city's Honour Roll of the World Wars, the park is today a local dedication to the conflicts which made Canadian freedom a reality.

Historical background:

Confederation Square existed originallyy as Peterborough's first cemetery. When Richard Birdsall first surveyed the area in 1825, he was instructed by The Canada Company to allot land to each of the Churches in the area. As a result, he allotted Lots one through six north of Murray and west of George Streets and Lots one through six south of McDonnell and west of George Streets to the Roman Catholic Church, the Church of Scotland and the Anglican Church. These churches immediately made the area a cemetery where many of the pioneer settlers and lumbermen from the Peter Robinson immigration of 1825 were buried. Lots one, two and three on each side were reserved for Protestant burials whereas Lots four, five and six on each side were Catholic. The area was known simply as "The Burial Ground". The Crown Grant to the Council of the District of Colborne for January 8, 1849 (Instrument #15094) came from Queen Victoria and gave the land as a burial ground. It was then that Lots one, two and three on each side became the official burial ground "for all denominations of the Protestant faith”. Harsh conditions of pioneer life as described by Catherine Parr Traill and Susanna Moodie took a heavy toll of lives) and by the mid 1840's, the original burial ground grew short of space. Town Council then closed the burial ground on August 8, 1851 when the new Little Lake Cemetery became ready for use. Upon the closing of the burial ground, many of the remains interred on the Protestant side were removed to Little Lake Cemetery or to the new Methodist Cemetery at George and Hilliard Streets. A high board fence was built around the old burial ground which, over the next twenty-five years, became a haven for vandals. During, 1867, part of Lot three north of Murray and west of George Streets was evidently leased to the local militia, although no record of such a lease was recorded at the local Registry Office. A wooden drill shed was built thereon during 1867 and remained there until it was destroyed by fire in 1909.

On June J, 1875, the County and Town Councils leased the Protestant area of the old Burial Ground to the Peterborough Agricultural Society of the West Riding for a period of ten years to be used as an Agricultural Park. For the next three years, the Central Exhibition was held there. Hog and sheep pens were built along Murray Street and cattle and horse barns along McDonnell Street. Main entrances to the park were at the two George Street corners. Almost immediately, local residents found the high board fence and livestock barns an eyesore in the middle of the town and proceedings began in 1877 to turn the area into a public park. On July 9, 1877, Town Council argued that because the original purpose for the Crown Grant ceased to exist, the County had no legal right to lease it to the Agricultural Society. The lease was then considered null and void and a memorial dated July 23, 1877 was sent to the Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario requesting the land for a park. Ontario Statute (1879) 42 Victoria, Chapter 67 vested the area (except for the portion of Lot three containing the Drill Shed) to the Corporation of the Town and County of Peterborough jointly to hold upon trust for the purposes of a public park. On August 18, 1884, Town Council declared that the area be known as "The Central Park" and that the fence and sheds be disposed of. Permission was granted to the Agricultural Society to set up the ground as a park. Money was granted for the purchase of flowers and sidewalks and flower beds were put in. On May 14, 1886, a memorial drinking fountain was unveiled in the park in the memory of Captain Edward T. Brown, a grandson of Thomas A. Stewart. Captain Brown died at Batoche on May 12, 1885 during the Northwest Rebellion and was the only local militia member to die during that conflict. Upon his death, a volunteer from his unit wrote a letter to the Peterborough Review initiating a movement to erect the memorial. A drive began to raise the necessary funds with Mr. E. B. Edwards as treasurer and Colonel H.C. Rogers, Captain Edwards, J.E. Hammond and Charles Stapleton responsible for collecting donations. Contributions came from such notable citizens as George A. Cox, Robert A. Morrow, George Hilliard, Joseph Flavelle, Robert Dennistoun, George Burnham, James Stevenson, Hon. Robert Hamilton, David Dumble and John Carnegie. Notable Peterborough architect and engineer John E. Belcher designed the monument and the committee hoped to secure the Court House Park for the monument site. However, Town Council turned down this proposal and chose Central Park for the site. originallyy, Mr. Belcher designed a massive structure to be nearly twelve feet in height and constructed principally of white marble. However, when donations ran short, he was forced to alter his plans. He designed a structure approximately six and one half feet high which sat upon a base. Instead of marble, the monument would be of Ohio sandstone on a base of Warsaw limestone. The design was in the Gothic style with one finial atop a centre gable with which the fountain was surmounted. The gable had a boldly moulded coping, relieved by quarter foil panels. Water flowed from a bronzed lion's head attached to the stone in a deeply recessed and richly moulded Gothic panel, the arches of which sprang from dwarfed shafts. There were pinnacled buttresses at each angle of the structure. In the centre of one panel read the inscription: "PRO PATRIA - -:APT. EDWARD T. BROWN - FISH CREEK, BATOCHE - 1885 - A 'tribute to the Canadian volunteers and to the memory of Capt. Edward T. Brown, of Boulton's Scouts, a native of this county who fell at Batoche on May 12, 1885". Constructed by Mr. Burgess, the fountain was placed originallyy in the east central part of the park (see photograph OP - 24 - 19) but was moved in 1929 after the erection of the war memorial. At this time, the limestone base was replaced with the present one of granite. Owing to the weathering of time, the inscription is today barely legible and the drinking fountain has long ceased to flow. On February 4, 1907, lot three south of McDonnell and west of George Streets was granted to the Peterborough Board of Education for use of the newly proposed Collegiate Institute.

Upon the burning in 1909 of the Drill Shed, Lot three north of Murray and west of George Streets was granted to the Peterborough Armouries for use. However, these lots were to be used for park purposes only. This rule was lifted during the 1920's and today the lots are used by their owners as a parade square and parking lot. In 1927, upon the occasion of the Diamond Jubilee of Canada’s Confederation, the Central Park became “Confederation Square" by which it is known today. On June 30, 1929, at a gala celebration entertaining more than half the local population, Sir Arthur Currie helped to unveil the War Memorial and Cenotaph in the centre of the park. Dedicated to Peterborough's unreturning brave of the Great War of 1914-1918, the Cenotaph had the added value of being designed by famed Canadian sculptor Walter Seymour Allward who had such credits to his name as the War Memorial at Vimy Ridge, France, the noted Baldwin-LaFontaine group on Parliament Hill, Ottawa and the Alexander Graham Bell Memorial in Brantford, Ontario. Peterborough's War Memorial was erected only after a lengthy debate which took place throughout much of the 1920's. Many residents did not want a memorial which would act as a constant reminder of the atrocities, hardships and losses suffered during the war. Others felt that such a reminder would be insurance that such atrocities would not recur.

The Cenotaph was finally erected from the funding subscribed to by the people of the Town and County of Peterborough. A third monument was unveiled on June 18, 1967 by the ex-servicewomen's branch 452 of the Royal Canadian Legion. Because the names of the war dead had long worn off the base of the Cenotaph, the honour roll in the City Hall remained the only list of Peterborough's heroes. The monument would invite visitors to view the book in the City Hall Lobby. The first geodetic bench marker in the city was placed in Confederation Square during the 1930's by the Geodetic Surveyors of Canada. The bench marker lists the city elevation at 673.721 feet and the geodetic elevation at 673.097 feet. The city datum is therefore .624 feet higher than the Geodetic datum. It also lists the city's latitude and longitude. In 1975, to mark the Sesquicentennial anniversary of the Peter Robinson immigration, a large decorative flowerbed was placed at the front entrance of the park off George Street. Each year, the flowerbed is dedicated to an event or society of local importance and is tended by the Board of Parks Management. In August, 1978, an organization of local war veterans known as Operation Cenotaph made it possible for the names of war victims which had worn off the base of the Cenotaph to be replaced. A drive began to raise money to pay for large bronze plaques and to have the names inscribed on them. The plaques were placed over the base of the Cenotaph and the dedication ceremony took place on June 24, 1979. At this time, the names of war dead from the Second World War and from the Korean Conflict were added to the Cenotaph.

Description of park for designation by-law:

The War Memorial is located in the centre of the park. There are walks and benches throughout the tree-lined park which has several tastefully designed and arranged flower beds. There are a few evergreen trees and small shrubs distributed throughout the area. A spiked metal fence separates the western side of the park from the Armouries and Peterborough Collegiate and Vocational School.

The Cenotaph sits on a circular, stepped base made of white granite. The pedestals for each of the two bronze figures are also of white granite, the west pedestal being carved on the front and back with the names of war victims from World War I. The four plaques placed over the inside of the western pedestal are of bronze and the names of all Peterborough war dead of the World Wars and the Korean Conflict are inscribed on them in raised gold lettering. A fifth plaque on the eastern side of the east pedestal remains as a dedication. Above the pedestals are two bronze figures of heroic dimensions, one representing the enemy full of rage and fury and the other of a heroic knight representing Canadian chivalry.

The monument erected by the ex-servicewomen has a rectangular base of rough white granite, a rectangular pedestal of smooth white granite and a polished monument of red granite in the shape of the City Honour Book. There is an inscription on the eastern side of the pedestal. The Brown Memorial, a monument of Ohio sandstone on a base of white granite, was originallyy a drinking fountain. The base is a two tiered, rough surfaced structure while the monument is in the finely cut Gothic style. Owing to the passing of time, the fountain no longer operates and the inscription on the western side of the sandstone is barely legible.

83 Robinson St

Location and legal description:

All and singular: that certain parcel or tract of land situate lying and being in the City of Peterborough, in the County of Peterborough and Province of Ontario and being composed of:

Firstly: The West halves of Lots Number One and Two South of Robinson Street and West of Mark Street according to Registered Plan Number lA for the said City of Peterborough,

Save and except the westerly 25 feet of the said Lots;

Secondly: The West half of Lot Number One Hundred and Twenty-Six West of Mark Street and South of Robinson Street according to Registered Plan Number lA for the said City

Save and except: the westerly 30 feet of the said lot;

Thirdly: That part of the East halves of Lots One and Two South of Robinson Street and West of Mark Street according to Registered Plan Number lA for the said City more particularly described as follows:

Commencing at the south-west angle of the East half of said Lot #2;

Thence easterly along the southern limit of said Lot # Two 4 8/10 feet;

Thence northerly in a straight line ninety feet to the intersection with a line drawn parallel with the southern limit of said Lot # Two distant 111 54/100 feet westerly from the easterly limit of said Lot # 2;

Thence northerly in a straight line to the north-west angle of the East Half of said Lot #1;

Thence southerly along the dividing line between the east and west halves of said Lots Number One and Two to the place of beginning. (Registered instrument #379267).

Date of construction: 1886

Architect: William Blackwell (of the firm, Ranney and Blackwell)

Contractor: William McMaster

Carpenter: James Steele

Site and setting:

Situated in the eastern section of Peterborough (formerly the Village of Ashburnham), 83 Robinson Street is in an area of dwelling houses with the exception of a separate school located directly across Robinson Street to the north. SIGNIFICANCE: Designed by Peterborough's nationally famed architect William Blackwell, this house is the best example of the "Bracketed" Italianate style of architecture in the city. Among the abundant architectural details are five different sizes of brackets, a circular corner tower, a large dormer, and numerous tall narrow windows many of which contain stained and painted glass. The house was built for John C. Sullivan, the founder of Ashburnham's Sullivan's Pharmacy and in the 1940's, it housed the Sisters of the Precious Blood of the Roman Catholic Diocese.

Historical background:

Like most land in the Ashburnham area, the lots now containing 83 Robinson Street originallyy went from the Crown to the Honourable Zaccheus Burnham, fromCobourg, who was in charge of surveying the land in the old Newcastle District. On December 10, 1856, Burnham sold the lots to Robinson Moore and over the next thirty years it would change owners many times before John C. Sullivan would buy it as the site for his large home. (See Appendix #1 for the Chain of Title).

Shortly after securing the Robinson Street lots, Mr. Sullivan hired the services of one of Peterborough's most illustrious architects, William Blackwell. Mr. Blackwell studied architecture in Toronto with his cousin Walter Strickland and practiced several years on the Canadian prairies before returning to Peterborough to design such buildings as the McWilliams-Harstone House at 565 Water Street. It is interesting to note that Mr. Blackwell designed the Sullivan House while a partner with the firm of Ranney and Blackwell, which existed for only a short time in Peterborough. The Peterborough Examiner on May 12, 1886 describes this house as follows: "Messr's Ranney and Blackwell have also prepared plans for a handsome residence for Mr. John C. Robinson who proposes building on Robinson Street, Ashburnham. The building will be of fine red brick, three stories high with a tower."

The building, which took place during the summer and fall of 1886, was not without its problems. Mr. Sullivan hired William McMaster as the contractor and James Steele for all carpentry work, neither of which could get along with the other. In a financial dispute, Mr. Steele placed a construction lien on the property holding up building for a short time (#1180). However the problem was soon cleared up and the work completed in good time. Born in Ontario in 1850, John C. Sullivan was of Irish descent. His grandparents came to the area in 1825 from Ireland with the Peter Robinson Immigration and settled in Ennismore. One of 10 children born to Bridget and John C. Sullivan Sr., Sullivan became a grocer by trade and opened a store in Ashburnham. The store stood on the site of the present day Sullivan's Pharmacy on Hunter Street East.

Before building the Robinson Street house, Sullivan and his Irish born wife Mary lived in rooms over the store. The couple had several children. Benson, Frederick, Vincent and Victor all worked in their father's store while Genevieve became a school teacher. The other Sullivan daughters were Mary Ailene, Mary Frances and Mary Louise. It was Victor and Vincent who later changed the grocery store into a pharmacy. Various members of the Sullivan family lived in the house until February 24, 1936 when Mary Ailene and Genevieve Sullivan sold it to the Roman Catholic Episcopal Corporation for the Diocese of Peterborough. On February 1, 1941 the house was conveyed to the Sisters of the Precious Blood of the Diocese of Peterborough. For the next 12 years it was a convent for the nuns whose principal occupation was making wafers for Holy Communion. Following the occupation by the nuns, the house changed ownership several times over a number of years. James E. Lillico, who purchased it on June 19, 1953, sold it the following year to Samuel Moldaver. On December 5, 1955 George W.C. Carphin bought the residence followed again by Mr. Lillico. Patrick V. and Emma Crowley were the owners from 1957 until 1962 and James A. and Margaret Golaska from 1962 to 1967. On February 7, 1967, Anthony R., Samuel and Nancy Lagana bought it and for a number of years it was used as a boarding house. It was during this period that a fire damaged part of the third floor. This, however, was quickly repaired. Finally on November 4, 1981 the Laganas sold it to John and Theresa Topic, both professors at Trent University, who are presently restoring it as a single family dwelling.

Architectural description for designation by-law:

The house is a very large two and one half storey red brick structure. It is best regarded as designed in the "Bracketed" Italianate style. Brackets are indeed the most interesting architectural feature of this building which displays no fewer than five different sizes of brackets. The tower and dormers contribute further Italianate architectural features. Its size and volume make it one of the largest homes in the city. The ceiling height on the ground floor is about 12 feet and the exterior openings attest to this fact. There are a great many windows which are all extremely tall and narrow; the upper sashes of those on the upper two storeys are edged with stained and painted glass. The building has a three bay, centre hall plan, and sits on a dressed stone foundation. On the foundation wall sits three wythes of brick. A brick plinth sheds water on the base and the brick lintels above all the openings are white clay brick in sharp contrast to the red brick. On the north west corner rises an octagonal tower with four dormer windows at the top. The roof is a low pitched hip roof. Again, the many sized brackets at the soffits, gable and under the portico of the central dormer contribute to the building's character. A new two and one half storey enclosed verandah has been added to the west side facilitating private access to the third floor. This verandah incorporates the brackets which were relocated from the original west facade of the house. The interior includes two hand painted stained glass windows at the landing of the main centre hall stairway.

538 Harvey St

Location and legal description:

This building is known municipally as 538 Harvey Street. Registered Number 287608: "ALL AND SINGULAR that certain parcel or tract of land and premises situate, lying and being in the City of Peterborough, in the County of Peterborough and Province of Ontario, and being composed of that part of Lot Number THREE, north of McDonnell Street, and East of Water Street, more particularly described as follows:

COMMENCING on the Eastern limit of Harvey Street, one hundred and forty-three feet six inches northerly from the south west angle of said lot;

THENCE Northerly along the eastern limit of Harvey Street, forty-two feet six inches;

THENCE Easterly parallel with the southern limit of said lot, one hundred and fourteen feet, more or less, to the eastern limit of the said lot;

THENCE Southerly along the eastern limit of the said lot, forty-two feet, six inches;

THENCE Westerly in a straight line to the place of beginning.

TOGETHER WITH AND SUBJECT to the right and liberty to the owner or owners for the time being of the land immediately adjoining on the North the lands hereby conveyed, in common with the owner or owners for the time being of the land hereby conveyed, and all persons authorized by either of them for all purposes connected with the use and enjoyment of the respective parcels of land, from time to time and at all times to pass and re-pass with or without horses and vehicles in, along and over a right-of-way over that part of said Lot Number THREE, described as follows:

COMMENCING at a point on the East side of Harvey Street at a distance of Five feet southerly from the north west corner of the land hereby conveyed;

THENCE Easterly parallel with the northern boundary of the land hereby conveyed to the eastern limit of the said Lot Number THREE;

THENCE Northerly along said eastern limit, ten feet;

THENCE Westerly parallel with the northern limit of the land hereby conveyed to Harvey Street;

And thence  Southerly along the East side of Harvey Street, Ten feet to the place of beginning."

Date of construction:1857 & 1859

Architect and/or builder: Unknown

Site and setting:

This dwelling is on the east side of Harvey Street, about midway between McDonnel and London Streets, in an exclusively residential neighbourhood. To the east, there is only one street between it and the river, where a power dam and a foot bridge are located. Water Street is one block to the west and the County Court House is about two blocks to the south.

Significance:

The kitchen wing was the original dwelling and is of log construction. The charming main house, in the Regency cottage style of architecture, is one of the very few dwellings in Peterborough to retain its original treilliage trim on its awning roofed verandah. Stucco, the earliest form of sheathing, covers the entire structure. The only apparent addition to the house is the dormer set into the front roof.

Historical background:

Reverend Mark Burnham was the first owner of the property, receiving the Crown Patent in 1850. In 1854 he sold the whole half acre, together with other lands, to George Dunsford for 500 pounds. In June of 1957 Mr. Dunsford sold 4902 square feet of this land to John Britton for 64-10 Pounds and the following year Henry Meyers bought it for 80 pounds. It was probably one of these early owners who built the small log house which later became the kitchen wing of the one storey Regency cottage which appears to have been erected by Henry Meyers before the property was sold to Edward Foster in December of 1859 for 120 pounds. In 1882 Frances J. Jameson's parents, who lived in Springville, bought this property from Mr. Foster's daughter as a wedding present for their son. Mrs. Jameson was Lavenia Greenwood of Cobourg, who came to Peterborough at the age of 16 to work for Wm. Hall. She died in 1959, three months before her 100th birthday. Mr. Jameson worked for the Examiner for many years, starting when he was 16 years old. He eventually became the foreman in the Examiner's Office. Jessie Mein purchased the property from the Jamesons in December, 1904 and sold it to Lucy A. and Fanny Dixon in September of 1924. Fanny Dixon was Superintendent of nurses at Nicholls Hospital for many years. She put a hot air gravity feed furnace into the house. The Dixon sisters were descendants of Wm. Dixon, one of the early pioneers who settled on the Communication Road just north of the town in 1818. Their early home was the fine two storey stone house, built in 1837 on Park Street, now owned by the city, but still known as "Dixon House". One of the sisters married William F. Nelson and lived in "The Pines" at 266 Burnham Street from 1904 to 1914. The house was sold to Stanley and Hilda Redout in 1955. Mrs. Redout died in 1973 and after Mr. Redout died in 1975, their daughter, Eva Mary Bonner inherited the property.

Exterior description for designation by-law:

This rectangular Regency Cottage with a low hip roof was originallyy only one storey high. The later addition of a semi-elliptical shaped dormer set into the front roof creates another half storey. The front facade has three bays. A central entrance with a door surrounded by transom and side lights is flanked on either side by a double hung sash window, with six panes in each sash. The awning shaped verandah roof has fine delicate lattice treilliage supports connected at the top by correspondingly delicate elliptical arches. The two sides of the main house are identical; each containing two windows, which are like those on the front facade. originallyy each side had a chimney located midway between the two windows. Now, the one on the south side has been replaced by a modern exterior chimney near the south end of the rear of the main house block. A rear wing, with a medium gable end, extends from near the north end of the main house. In the centre of its north side is an original small double hung sash window, with six panes in each sash, and a smaller modern window to its right. Centered on the rear gable end is another original window like the one on the north side. To its left is a small modern window. The south side has a centre door with a window like the other original ones on the rear wing beside it on the right. originallyy there was probably a corresponding window beside the door on the left, but this is now covered, or replaced by a clapboard enclosure. In addition, the south side has a verandah across its full length. A chimney breaks the ridge about midway. This rear wing is of log construction and has the proportions and details associated with early log structures. The whole structure is clad with stucco which was the original sheathing of the front Regency block and was probably applied to the kitchen wing when the main house was constructed. Brief prepared by Martha Ann Kidd from information researched by Gina Bassciano and Martha Ann Kidd. Old Photograph by courtesy of the Archives of the Peterborough Centennial Museum. Current photographs by Frances Craig.

CHAIN OF TITLE

 

HENRY MYERS COTTAGE 538 Harvey Street PATENT December 24, 1850 The Crown to Mark Burnham All 1/2 acre

 

B&S #7784 - July 6, 1854 - Registered, July 8, 1854 Mark Burnham et ux to George Dunsford ₤500 - All 1/2 acre and other lands

B&S #11736 - June 24, 1867 - Registered, June 27. 1857 George Dunsford to John Britton 564-10 - Part - 4902 sq. feet B&S #12559 - March 13, 1858 - Registered, October 6, 1858 John Britton et ux to Henry Meyers ₤80 - Part - 4902 sq. feet

B&S #13544 - December 23, 1859 – Registered, December 24, 1859 Henry Meyers et ux to Edward Foster ₤120 - Part - 4902 sq. feet

B&S #5404 - September 27, 1882 - Registered, October 4, 1882 Mary Ann Garner (formerly Mary Ann Foster) & Wm. Garner, her husband, to Francis J. Jameson $900. - Part

GRANT #17623 - December 10, 1904 - Registered, December 20, 1904 Francis J. Jameson et ux to Jessie Mein $1400 - Part, with & subject to Rt. of Way

GRANT #21889 - September 11, 1924 - Registered, September 16, 1924 Jessie Mein (widow) to Lucy A. & Fanny Dixon as joint tenants $2850. - Part, with & subject to Rt. of Way

GRANT #69854 - October 6, 1955 - Registered, October 14, 1955 Fanny Dixon (spinster) to Stanley & Hilda M. Redout as joint tenants $3000. - Part, with & subject to Rt. of Way

GRANT #287608 - May 13, 1975 - Registered, September 26, 1975 Eva Mary Bonner (administrator of Estate of Hilda Monica Redout) to the said Eva Mary Bonner (Stanley Redout died March 23, 1973) (Hilda Redout died January 3, 1975) $1,00 & consideration - Part, with & subject to Rt. of Way

488 Aylmer St N

Location and legal description:

The property is known municipally as 488 Aylmer Street. - Registered Plan #41140 - ... "ALL and Singular that certain parcel or tract of land and premises, situate, lying and being in the City of Peterborough in the County of Peterborough and Province of Ontario and being composed of all of Lot Number Two, according to and shown upon registered Plan number three for the said City of Peterborough TOGETHER with the right of way as shown on said plan.

Original owner: William Malcolm

Owner, 1985: Ellen Mayfield Morrison

Date of construction: 1857.

Architect: Unknown.

Contractor: Unknown.

Site and setting:

The Malcolm House is situated in the central part of Peterborough between Murray and McDonnel Streets. The house is bordered by private residences to the north and the south and by Aylmer Street to the west. A public lane separates the east side of the property from the property of the Peterborough Armouries.

Significance:

This is an important heritage building for several reasons. It is a good example of the stacked plank method of construction popular in the 1850s. The Classical Revival style of architecture adapted to a small house is unique. William Malcolm, the original owner was a well known and respected machinist in the city. After over a century and a quarter, this dwelling still retains most of its original appearance, including its small pane windows and stucco sheathing.

Historical background:

The Malcolm House stands on one of the lots which existed originallyy as clergy reserve land. When Richard Birdsall first surveyed the North-East corner of North Monaghan Township for a town site, he was instructed to allocate certain amounts of land to each church in the area. As a result, he allotted the two half acre lots on the east side of Aylmer Street, between Murray and McDonnel Streets, to the Anglican Church. The remainder of the block, eastward to George Street, was allocated, and used, as the burial ground for all denominations in the town. The burial ground was closed in 1851 and most of the bodies were removed to other new cemeteries at the edge of town. In 1855, the area was re-surveyed, the Anglican land was broken up into nine lots and the new plan entered into the Land Registry Office.

 A twenty foot wide lane, running parallel to Aylmer Street, separated the nine new Aylmer Street lots from the Old Burial Ground (now the Peterborough Armoury property). On the new plan, known as Town Plan #3, the lot under discussion became known as lot number 2. It measured 42 feet by 94 feet. On August 11, 1855, the nine Anglican lots were sold at auction at the Albert House. It was on August 23rd that the deed was finalized for lot #2 between the Rector and Churchwarden of St. John's Church and William Malcolm. At this time Mr, Malcolm bought only part of lot #2 and it was not until March 3, 1869 that he became the owner of the rest of the lot; purchasing it from William Ward. However, Mr. Malcolm went ahead with the construction of his house which he was occupying by 1857. William Malcolm came to the Peterborough area from Scotland in 1846 and immediately set up one to the town foundries. An article in the Peterborough Despatch dated September 7, 1848 reports that Mr. Malcolm was one of the town's most respected machinists of the era.

He built his house using the stacked plank method of construction which was widely used in Peterborough during its boom period of timber output in the 1850's and 1860's. Since shipping was difficult and expensive, only first grade timber was shipped out leaving culled boards, containing one or more knots, for home consumption. For many years, Peterborough produced more board feet of lumber than any other town in Ontario creating a great surplus which was used in this type of building construction. As the name implies, stacked plank construction is a method of stacking 1 x 10 inch undressed planks one on top of another until the desired height is achieved. The planks are dovetailed at the corners and secured with spikes.

Every other plank is recessed one inch leaving indentations on both the exterior and interior surfaces which act as lath to hold the stucco sheathing. In addition to its interesting construction method, this house is architecturally unique. The gabled front facade, which takes the form of a large pediment, extends beyond the front of the house to form the verandah which gives the house its Neo-Classical appearance. On May 9, 1883, William Malcolm sold the house and lot to Thomas Sarginson, a carter, for $825.

In 1916 Mr. Sarginson granted his personal estate, which included this property, to his son, Thomas Sarginson Jr. Like his father, Thomas, Jr. was also a carter and a teamster. Lewis H. Ingram, a Customs Clerk with the Quaker Oats Company, became the owner of the property in 1927. He never lived in the house, however, preferring to rent it out. During the late 1920's and early 1930's Arthur S. Foster, a fireman, resided in the house with his wife Greta. During the late 1930's and early 1940's, Edward P. Suddards, his wife and his son, Edward Jr. live there. Both the father and the son were painters at the Canadian General Electric Company. The present owner, Miss Ellen Mayfield Morrison purchased the house in 1945. At that time she worked as a clerk for Elliott's Stationary Store. Her widowed mother lived with her until her death in 1957. At present, Miss Morrison has the house rented.

Architectural description for designation purposes:

The Malcolm House, at 488 Aylmer Street, is modified Neo- Classical in style. It is a single storey, three bay, rectangular dwelling with a centre entrance in the front gable facade. The upper part of this gabled front extends beyond the front of the house, creating a pediment which forms the roof of the verandah. The pediment is trimmed with a simpie boxed cornice. The pediment verandah roof is supported by square posts which greatly resemble the square columns which support the monumental pediment of the Grover-Nicholls House. This similarity serves to reinforce the Classical Revival image which the house projects. The method of construction is stacked plank. Some of the original stucco sheathing is retained on the front facade, but flush boards and other sheathing has been used on the sides. The main windows are flat in shape and are surrounded by wooden moulded trim. These windows have double hung sashes each containing six panes. The main entrance is also flat in shape and has wooden moulding trim similar to that of the windows. There is a partly glazed single leaf door with two moulded rail decorated panels (it may not be original). Above the door is a transom which contains small pane lights.

Chain of Title

Lot #2 of 1855 Survey being registered as part of Lot #7, North of McDonnel Street and West of George Street Patent November 7,1848 - The Crown to Church Society Diocese of Toronto - ALL ½ acre

B & S August 23, 1855 - Registered: #11898. Rector & Church wardens of St. John's Church to William Malcolm ALL & other land - £75

B&S October 3, 1853 - Registered October 3, 1853 (#6480) Charles T. Ware et ux to Thomas Hutchinson - ALL & other land - £173

B&S March 15, 1856 - Registered March 15, 1856 (#10119) - Thomas Hutchinson et ux to James Gallon - ALL & other land - £126

B&S April 6, 1863 - Registered December 30, 1863 (#16661) -James Gallon et ux & Wilson A. Conger, Carlas S. Sherman, Charles A. Weller, George B. Hally - by their attorney Charles A. Weller to Vincent M. Clementi - All & other land - premises plus 15 shillings.

B&S May 2, 1868 - Registered January 12, 1869 (#178) - Vincent M. Clementi et ux to George A. Cox - ALL & other land - $278.00.

B&S August 21, 1871 - Registered August 23, 1871 (#833) George A. Cox et ux to Ebenezar Bakwell - ALL - $800.

B&S September 21,1877 - Registered September 21, 1877 (#3512) Ebenezar Bakwell et ux to Thomas Morrice - ALL subject to mortgage - $1800. --

B&S March 1, 1880 - Registered March 5, 1880 (#4378) - Thomas Morrice et ux to Jane Robinson - ALL subject to mortgage cons- $1200.00.

533 Harvey St

Location and legal description:

The property is known municipally as 533 Harvey Street - Registered Plan #419677. "ALL and Singular that certain parcel or tract of land and premises, situate, lying and being in the City of Peterborough in the County of Peterborough and Province of Ontario and being composed of the south fifty-one feet of the North Half of Lot Number Two North" of McDonnel Street and East of Water Street in the said City of Peterborough.

COMMENCING at a Point in the eastern limit of said Lot, distant fortyfive feet southerly from the North East angle of said lot;

THENCE westerly parallel with the northern limit of said lot to the western limit of said lot;

THENCE southerly along the western limit of said lot fifty-one feet more or less to the southern limit of the North Half of the said lot;

THENCE easterly parallel with the northern limit of said lot to the eastern limit thereof;

THENCE northerly along the said eastern limit fifty-one feet more or less to the place of beginning.

TOGETHER WITH a right of way over a strip of land five feet wide laid out on said Lot, north of and adjoining the lands hereby conveyed, and subject to a right of way over the northern Five feet the eastern to the of the lands hereby conveyed, and extending from western limit of the said lot.

Original owner: John Britton.

Owner, 1985: Christopher A. Landry.

Date of construction: 1850.

Architect: Unknown.

Builder: Unknown.

Site and setting:

The Britton House is situated in the area between the Otonabee River and Water Street north of the County Court House. This section of Peterborough is residential. It contains many early houses most of which were occupied by craftsmen who either had their own shops or were employed in the mills which lined the river. SIGNIFICANCE: This house is important because of its age and because it remains today as a good example of the Simple Gothic Style typical of the third quarter of the nineteenth century. Erected about 1850 as a simple one-storey frame dwelling, it was "modernized" in the late 1870's to conform with the Gothic style of the period. This was accomplished by cladding the structure with brick and adding the central decorated gable, which contains a round topped window. John Britton, a cooper, and his family retained the house from 1851 to 1918.

Historical background:

This dwelling has had very few owners in the 135 years of its existence. Although the first owner of the property was William Dolelius, who received the Crown Patent for the whole of Lot 2, north of McDonnel and east of Water Street in August of 1847, it was John Britton who first occupied the house erected about 1850 on the North half of this lot. He lived here until his death about 1903. His widow remarried but retained possession of the house until 1918 when she sold it to Theodore M. Caldwell, who held it for only two years. Sidney W. Constable purchased it in 1920 and it was not sold again untilJanuary 1959, after his widow's death. Frederick J. O'Brien, his wife and children were the owners of this property between 1959 and October 1984 when it was purchased by the present owner, Christopher A. Landry. The first owner of this dwelling was John Britton, a cooper, who emigrated from Ireland in 1847. The exact date when he became established at this location cannot be determined, but by 1851 he was well established. His cooperage was behind the house closer to Water Street. It is known that he had a small mill to the north of his dwelling because the builders of the house at 543 Harvey Street had difficulties with their basement due to the accumulation of sawdust.

The Peterborough Examiner reported on November 20, 1884 that: "Mr. Britton's cooper shop burned down Sunday morning at 1 o'clock". It is not known whether he had it rebuilt. The 1875 Bird's Eye View of Peterborough clearly shows this house as a one storey dwelling with a verandah across the front. Soon after this date John Britton enlarged and "modernized" the house by adding a peaked gable with a round topped window to the upper half storey and cladding the/entire structure with brick. It could have been at this time that the original small panes in the sash windows were replace be two large panes in each sash, or this could have been a later renovation. There is a large finial which both projects and drops from the peak of the gable. This may have been the only gable trim or it may have been supplemented by "gingerbread" bargeboard trim, which has been removed.

Architectural description for designation purposes:

The Britton House, at 533 Harvey Street presents the typical appearance of the Simple Gothic Style as it developed in the Peterborough area. The house is rectangular in shape with medium pitched gables at either end. The three bay front facade has a centre entrance on the first storey with a peaked gable above it on the second storey. Small paned side lights, with lower panels, and a small paned transom surround the doorway. The walls on either side of the entrance are broken in the centre by square topped, double hung sash windows. The double hung sash window in the upper gable has a round top. A hipped roof verandah extends across the entire front facade. Its supporting posts may be original. The two ends of the structure are identical. Each has one window on the lower storey and two on the upper storey.

They all have square tops and contain double hung sashes. There is a kitchen wing attached to the rear of the house. Concerning trim, all window and door openings have radiating voussoir head surrounds. Although most of the drop finial at the peak of the gable has been lost, the projecting finial still remains. Unfortunately the brick exterior has been painted in recent years. The sand blast method cannot be used to remove it, and other method should be used with care after careful testing.

Peterborough YCMA (475 George St N)

Location:

The lands and buildings, known municipally as 475 George Street North, are on part of Lots 1 & 2, South of Murray Street and West of George Street, in the City of Peterborough, in the County of Peterborough and in the Province of Ontario. OWNER: The Peterborough Family Y.M.C.A.

Dates of construction: 1895 - William Blackwell 1930 - Walter Blackwell 1969 - Craig & Zeidler 1978 - Allen, Brown & Sherriff of Toronto

Significance:

This substantial Victorian structure is an anchor building to an important civic square in Peterborough which in addition to other public buildings includes the City Hall and the Armouries. In addition, this building marks the north end of Peterborough's main commercial thoroughfare, George Street. The original plans and the later additions were the work of some of Canada's leading architects.

Historical background: See attached brief prepared by the Y.M.C.A.

Exterior description for designation by-law:

The original Y.M.C.A. building is a rectangular, three storey brick structure with a full basement. Several additions have been added, designed to extend and compliment the original structure. The original 1895 building, designed by William Blackwell, and the 1930 addition, planned by his son, Walter Blackwell, are Victorian in design and contain many Italianate features. The foundation wall is of coarsely-dressed limestone blocks with a top course of smooth-dressed limestone which forms the sill for the first storey windows. The main building is of red brick with a decorative brick course at the first storey which stretches around the building and defines the window arches. A similar brick trim is used as a decorative course above the brick arches on the windows at the third storey and the tower. Brick string courses define the top and the bottom of the rectangular shaped second storey windows and stretch around the building. This feature is repeated at the fourth storey and forms the sill of the windows at this level. Special brick are also used at the corners of the octagonal tower. A base for the cornice at the tower and the north wall is formed with brick arches resting on corbelled brick supports. The tower extends from the second storey above and becomes a dominant civic feature at the corner of George and Murray Streets. A stone cap at the base of the tower forms a junction between the northeast brick corner and the northeast octagonal face of the tower. The tower is topped with a short spire roofed with metal shingles formed to resemble clay tiles. A finial completes the spire. The roof is a simple gable with a single stacked chimney. The cornice below contains large dentils. The windows are varied and interesting: the windows on the first or main floor are large arched windows with arched mullions set in brick arches. The second floor windows are rectangular with stone lintels above. The windows on the third storey and tower are smaller arched windows set in brick arches

Statement of Significance

Provided by Y.M.C.A On the 17th of March, 1874 a re-organization occurred and the association moved to the Bradburn Building where they remained until December of 1881, paying a rental fee of $300 per year. It was on June 5th of this year that Mr. J.D. Collins was appointed to the position of General Secretary. A further re-organization occurred on March 22, 1881 at a meeting held in the Orange Hall. During this year, a series of religious revival meetings in the town gave fresh impetus to the work on religious lines. Mr. G.E. Williams was the first paid secretary. A home for it was established in 2 rooms over a store called "The Fair" on George Street. After occupying these rooms for several years, the association was incorporated under the name of the Peterborough Young Men's Christian Association and secured new and larger premises at the north-east corner of George and Brock Streets, and there carried on under the secretaryship of Mr. Colville and Mr. Stephens.

More extensive premises were soon needed and these were obtained over James Long's bakeshop at 386 George Street, where shower baths and a small gymnasium were available for members. The association had its financial difficulties, but these were removed in 1890 by a legacy of $20,000, under the will of Peterborough's Universal Benefactrix, Mrs. Charlotte Nicholls.

This was allowed to accumulate for 5 years when the Directors felt justified in providing the association with a fitting habitation of its own. On March 31, 1895 plans were submitted by Mr. Blackwell, architect, and accepted and a contract was let to A.A. McIntyre for $13,175 without heating, plumbing or wiring. In May 1897 the Association moved into its new home and a bronze tablet was placed in the entrance hall in memory of Mrs. Nicholls. In 1898 a movement originated for providing a dormitory for young men away from home who might live there in congenial conditions under the auspices of the Association. After long and careful consideration the Directors favoured the idea and in May 1905 the dormitories were opened. By this time the facilities included not only the dormitories but also a gymnasium which still exists in today's building, a swimming bath, 2 lobbies, a reading room, a dining room, and a kitchen.

In July, 1906 a campsite on the north shore of Clear Lake was purchased for the purpose of holding a boys camp under the Association's auspices. In July, 1908 the "Y" extended its activities by installing bowling alleys and enlarging the boys' department. In 1909, arrangements were made with the Board of Education whereby pupils at the Collegiate received physical training in the gymnasium under the direction of the Association's Physical Director. In July of 1922, the first group of about forty boys attended Camp Kawartha which is located on the south shore of Clear Lake.

This camp was financed and built by the Rotary Club of Peterborough. Rotary discovered, however, that the operation of a summer camp required skills, time and effort incompatible with the normal activities of business executives and professional practitioners. An agreement was made with the Y.M.C.A. which had the leaders and equipment for boys' work. The Y's Men's Club gave its support and leased the camp property free of charge. Over the years, the Rotary Club and the Peterborough Y’s Men's Club invested money and effort to maintain and improve this property. In 1954, the Y.M.C.A. purchased the property for $1,500 giving assurance to the Rotary Club that it would always be used for camp work among young people. In 1965, the Y.M.C.A. Camp Committee once again sought assistance of the Rotary Club, and from that time the Rotary Club has given the camp a yearly grant to help boys unable to pay their way to camp. Four decades of weather and use took toll of the original buildings, and in 1966 the Rotary Club agreed to replace the dining hall on the campsite at an estimated cost of $7,500. At least forty Rotarians derived much satisfaction and pleasure from their exertions as the new dining hall took shape and became a reality in time for use during the 1967 season.

Continued renovations have taken place at Camp Kawartha with the help of the Rotary Club and the present Peterborough Y's Men's Club, and it is presently to the stage where camp can be used for year-round activities. Right in the midst of the depression a campaign was held to increase the Peterborough Building facilities. A 60' x 25' swimming pool was completed in 1930.

From 1930 to 1964 these facilities were adequate; however, due to a marked increase in swimming, the use of the gymnasium, club rooms, etc. a further campaign was seen necessary. The results of this campaign brought about the opening of our now 25 metre swimming pool, and our new youth centre in 1969.

In 1968, with the acquisition of a Provincial Charter, the Organization officially changed its name and became The Peterborough Family Y.M.C.A. Many renovations have taken place in the old 1896 building, so that the present facility includes a modern up-to-date Men's Health Club and a Ladies Trimnasium. We are now able to provide a personalized program for adults and a wide range of recreational activities for everyone in the community.

The Young Men's Christian Association is a world-wide fellowship dedicated to the growth of persons in spirit, mind and body, and in a sense of responsibility to each other and to the human community

661 Park St N

Location and legal description:

This building is known municipally as 661 Park Street, North. It is legally described as follows: ALL AND SINGULAR that certain parcel or tract of land and premises situate, lying and being in the City of Peterborough, in the County of Peterborough and Province of Ontario, and being composed of those parts of Lots Number 54 and 69, according to Registered Plan Number 165 of the said City, shown bordered in red on plan of survey attached hereto, which said parcel is further described as follows, that is to say: All of lot 69 according to Registered Plan of Peterborough saving and excepting thereout the northerly 75 feet of the westerly 5 feet thereof; together with the southerly 27 feet of lot 54' according to Registered Plan 165 for the City of Peterborough; SUBJECT TO a right of way to those entitled thereto over part of the said Lot Number 69, extending diagonally from the easterly limit to the northerly limit thereof, as shown coloured yellow on the said plan of survey.

Original owner: William Dixon.

Owner:  1985: The City of Peterborough.

Date of construction: 1837

Architect and/or Builder: Masonry work by Adam and John Hall.Woodwork supervised by Joseph Chamberlain.

Site and setting:

This property is situated on the west side of Park Street North, south of Wolseley Avenue and north of Parkhill Road. It lies halfway up the hill, surrounded by war time houses of the 1940's on a diminished lot, severely constricting the area around the attractive front entrance which is no longer used as such. This lot is larger than the surrounding lots and there is a good sized area between the house and Park Street.

Significance:

This is one of the oldest houses in Peterborough. It was built for William Dixon in 1837 on the site of his earlier 1829 home. Built of stone from the Jackson's Park Quarry, it is one of the few remaining stone houses in Peterborough. William Dixon emigrated with his parents to Smith Township in 1818 as one of the "Colony Settlers". He was a man with more than a local reputation. In addition to other activities, he was District Magistrate and a Captain in the Militia.

Historical background:

William Dixon, Senior, and his wife, Nancy Chesterfield, came to Peterborough in 1818. Six families - the Dixons, the Lees, the Smiths, the Milburns, the Waltons, and the Wilsons are known as the Colony Settlers. All originated from Alston, Cumberland, England and sailed together from Whitehaven on the Jason, on May 17, 1818. The Colony Settlers journeyed to this area via Rice Lake and the Otonabee River. Their grants of land were in Smith Township along the Communication Road, now known as Chemong Road and now part of the City of Peterborough. The six families, which consisted of 19 men, 19 women and 64 children, spent their first winter in a large, rough communal log shanty. Tradition holds that this shanty was located on the triangle of land now bounded by Parkhill Road, Chemong Road and Stewart Street. In the spring they, located their, lands and worked together to erect shanties for each of the families and began to clear the land. During the first few years of hardships there were deaths in nearly all the families. Of the Dixons, the youngest child, Utrick, - and the oldest son, Isaac, died within two years. Three years later, the father, William, died leaving his sons to carry on; William Junior being eighteen or nineteen at the time. The family did carry on and thrived.

William married Isabella Harvey in 1829 and moved into a new house. At this time the Dixon property was divided; William retaining the west half and one of his brothers, Joseph, acquiring the east half. In 1837, William replaced his home with the present stone house, which was erected on the foundations of the 1829 building. William built a saw mill on Dixon's -Creek, which became a very important adjunct of the new settlement. It is thought that the lumber for the woodwork in the house and for the barns and outbuildings was obtained from trees on the property and sawn at his sawmill. There is a tradition that before the founding of the Methodist Church, William Dixon allowed the Methodists to meet in his home, even though he himself was not a staunch Anglican. He even assisted them to erect their first church. William was District Magistrate and held court in Port Hope and Cobourg, traveling to and from either on foot or on horseback. He was Captain in the Militia and took part in the 1837 Rebellion. His family still preserves his old flintlock as a memento of those troubled times. He died in 1849, leaving his wife Isabella, who lived to be more than eighty years old. James, son of William, lived his entire life in the house. He married Lucy Crawford and had seven children. A generation was born and raised in the house before it passed out of the Dixon family. Several charming water colour drawing still exists showing the house as it originallyy looked, surrounded by spacious lawns and gardens. It shows the house as having a two storey encircling verandah with French windows opening onto it on both storeys of the verandah. It also shows the house as being stucco clad, as it is today. An item of passing interest is that the property is registered in the name of HIS MAJESTY THE KING IN RIGHT OF THE DOMINION OF CANADA between 1941 and 1975 when it was sold to its present owner, the City of Peterborough. It was acquired by the government for the purpose of constructing "temporary" war time housing during the Second World War.

Exterior description of building for designation by-law:

Dixon House is a single detached rectangular building with a wing attached on the north side. The full basement and both building units are constructed of natural stone quarried from nearby Jackson Park. The main building has two and a half storeys and the wing one storey. The main building has been smooth stuccoed over stone on three sides, leaving the natural stone exposed on the north side. The rear wing has been stuccoed only on the east side. The main building has a shallow hip roof which is broken in the centre of the north side by a gabled dormer and by a recent shed shaped dormer opening onto a fire escape on the west side.

There are four single stack chimneys, two on the east side and two on the west side. The roof trim consists of a plain boxed cornice made of wood. The south facade has three bays on each of the first and second storeys. The principal entrance is in the centre of the first storey. The six panel door looks original. It is surrounded by side panels and transom lights. Each side panel has a single wood panel with moulded trim at the bottom with glass lights above. Transom lights are located above the door and above the side panels. All lights have small panes divided by muntins. (See photograph of entrance for details of the design of the lights.) The five windows on the front facade are unusual, being casement windows, pulling inward with eight panes in each sash. Above these casements are fixed glass panels with small panes of the same design as those surrounding the front entrance.

Below the casements are fixed wooden panels which cover the lower part of the windows. Across the lower part of the upper windows are balustrades with turned wood spindles. Old pictures show a two storey verandah/gallery surrounding the house on three sides. The coverings on the lower part of the windows were probably added for protection when the verandah/gallery was removed. There are four other casement windows on the main building; two on the east side and two on the west side, placed one above the other near the back. The two on the second storey have eight panes in each casement sash and fixed bottom panels of wood. The bottom windows have twelve panes in each casement sash. On the north side of the main building are two double hung sash windows on the second storey which still retain their original nine over six pane sashes. The one storey rear wing, with a medium pitched gable end roof extends northward from the main building. Until recently a single stack brick chimney was located at the gable end and all the original stone was exposed. Now the chimney is gone and the east side is stuccoed. This was probably done when the new side entrance addition was erected.

There are two windows on the west side, one of which still retains its original six over six, double hung. sashes. On the east side is one original six over six pane, double hung sash window.

Chain of title:

1. PATENT October 1, 1824 - The Crown to William Dixon - ALL 165 acres.

2. WILL September 1, 1826 - William Dixon to William Jr. and Joseph Dixon - no description, (#1433) - all 279 acres.

3. Q.CLAIM July 2, 1838 - Joseph Dixon to William Dixon Jr. - no description, (#5201) - All 165 acres.

4. WILL September 21, 1870 - William Dixon Jr. to James Harvey Dixon (47 G.R.) - All 165 acres.

5. DEED November 18, 1872 - James Dixon et ux to Alex Haggart - (#718) All except parts sold and described as-Sold.

6. DEED November 18, 1872 - Alex Haggart to Lucy Jane Dixon - (#719) - as above.

7. B&S June 8, 1894 - Albert Dixon et ux to Elizabeth J. Laplante (#4645) - Part use of land, well and other.

8. Q.CLAIM May 2, 1932 - Cordelia Masson, Josepp Duranceau and Roland Glover, Executors and Trustees of Noah Laplante to Joseph B. and Elizabeth M. Law - (#11636) - All and other.

9. GRANT November 12, 1941 - Elizabeth M. Law to HIS MAJESTY THE KING IN THE RIGHT OF THE DOMINION OF CANADA –(#13169) - Part - $6,000.

10. GRANT March 4, 1947 - Registered, October 1, 1975 - HIS MAJESTY THE KING IN RIGHT OF THE DOMINION OF CANADA to The Corporation of the City of Peterborough - (#287943) - Part, Subject to right of way and other land.

520 Dickson St

Location and legal description:

The property is known municipally as 520 Dickson Street - Registered Plan #223449. "ALL and Singular that certain parcel or tract of land and premises, situate, lying and being in the City of Peterborough in the County of Peterborough and Province of Ontario, and being composed of Lots Number 8 and 9, South of McDonnel Street and East of Water Street, part of McDonnel Street closed by By-Law registered 18 January 1878, all of Lot Number 46 and part of Lot Number 47 according to Registered Plan Number 132 for the said City of Peterborough, and part of the Triangular piece of land East of Waterford Street and part of the Mill Reserve North of Murray Street and South of Dublin Street, in the said City of Peterborough; which said parcel is shown bordered in red on plan of survey attached to Registered Instrument Number 56788 for the City of Peterborough and may be more particularly described as follows, that is to say: PREMISING that the Eastern limit of Dickson Street has an astronomical course North 2 degrees 57' West and relating all bearings herein thereto;

COMMENCING at a point in the Northern limit of McDonnel Street distant 15.08 feet measured on a course South 87 degrees 11' West from an iron post marking the intersection of the Easterly limit of Dickson Street with the Northern limit of McDonnel Street in the said City; which said point marks the most south easterly angle of the lands conveyed by Registered Instrument Number 47380 of the said City;

THENCE north 3 degrees 43' to and along the westerly face of the cement retaining wall now standing within the said lot being along the limit of the lands conveyed by the lastly mentioned Instrument, 11.25 feet to the North Westerly angle of the said wall; THENCE 83 degrees 40' east along the Northern face of the said wall and being along a limit of the said Registered Instrument number 15.08 feet to its intersection with the westerly limit of the said Lot Number Forty-six according to the said Registered Plan Number One Hundred and Thirty-two;

THENCE North 2 degrees 25' west, along the said westerly limit of the said Lot Number Forty-six, 48.67 feet, more or less, to an iron post marking the most Northerly angle of the said Lot; THENCE South 70 degrees 50' East over part of the said Triangular Piece of Land and part of the said Mill or Government Reserve, and being along a limit of the lands now owned by the Peterborough Hydraulic Company Limited, 162.75 feet to an iron post placed at a point in the Northern limit of that part of McDonnel Street now closed by By-Law dated the 18th of January, 1878;

THENCE South 30 degrees 19' East along part of the said McDonnel Stre~t closed by the said By-Law and over part of said Lot Number Nine South of McDonnel and East of Water Street, 109.5 feet to an iron post; THENCE South 88 degrees 29' West over parts of the said Lots Numbers Eight and Nine, 202.06 feet to a point in the Westerly limit of the said Lot Number Eight;

THENCE North 2 degrees 561 West, 91.85 feet to the said iron post marking the intersection of the said Eastern limit of Dickson Street with the Northerly limit of McDonnel Street;

THENCE South 87 Degrees 11' West along the said limit of McDonnel Street, 15.08 feet, more or less, to The point of Commencement.

TOGETHER WITH a right of way in common with the Grantor and those entitled thereto under her over a strip of land 10 feet in width lying immediately South West of and adjoining the North Eastern limit of the said Lot Number Forty-seven as shown on the said Registered Plan Number One Hundred and Thirty-two; the South Westerly limit of the said right of way being parallel with the lastly mentioned limit of the said Lot Number Forty-seven and extending from a point in the dividing line between the said Lots Number Forty-six and Forty-seven, to a point in the Southern limit of Riverview Place as shown on the Registered Plan.

AND TOGETHER with a right of way more particularly described as follows: "ALL and Singular that certain parcel or tract of land and premises, situate, lying and being in the City of Peterborough in the County of Peterborough and Province of Ontario, and being composed of a 16-foot right of way across parts of Lots Number 9 north of Murray Street and south of McDonnel Street and part of the Government Reserve, all east of Water Street, in the said City; which said right of way is shown coloured yellow on the plan attached to Registered Instrument Number 62714 for the City of Peterborough and may described as follows:

PREMISING that the eastern limit of Dickson Street in the said City has an astronomical course of north 2 degrees 56' west and relating all bearings herein, thereto;

COMMENCING at a post in the northern limit of the said right of way; which said post is distant 202.06 feet as measured on a course north 88 degrees 29' east from a point in the said eastern limit of said Dickson Street distant 91.85 feet as measured southerly along the said limit from an iron post place at the intersection thereof with the northern limit of McDonnel Street in the said City;

THENCE south 39 degrees 19' east, 6.5 feet to a concrete monument;

THENCE south 21 degrees 43' east, 121.71 feet to a concrete monument;

THENCE south 20 degrees 43' east, 70.18 feet to a concrete monument;

THENCE south 87 degrees 29' west, 93.01 feet to a post;

THENCE north 11 degrees 26' east, 16.49 feet; THENCE north 87 degrees 29' east, 63.05 feet;

THENCE north 42 degrees 30' east, 14.15 feet;

THENCE north 2 degrees 28' west, 41.47 feet;

THENCE north 21 degrees 43' west, 117.8 feet;

THENCE north 30 degrees 19' west, 14.1 feet;

THENCE north 88 degrees 29' east, 18.26 feet more or less, to the said point of commencement.

Original owner: Elizabeth Dickson David

OWNERS, 1986: Ralph Frederick and Margot Anne Hull.

Date of construction: 1877.

Architect: Possibly John E. Belcher.

Site and setting:

The Elizabeth Davidson House is located on top of the hill at the east end of McDonnel Street on a large piece of property. The view from the rear over the Otonabee River is spectacular.

Significance:

Although alterations have been made over the years to this house, it still remains a good example of the larger Tuscan style Italianate houses popular in Peterborough in the mid 1870's. It was either designed by Architect John E. Belcher or a copy of his style. It is one of three large houses built for the daughters of Samuel Dickson, Peterborough's Lumber Baron, and remained part of the Dickson Estate until 1969.

Historical background:

This prime river side property was acquired, by Crown Patent, by Judge George Barker Hall in 1841. The Judge owned extensive property in the area, much of which was used for speculation. This is evident on this piece of land by the number of times it was in trust, sold, repurchased and mortgaged. Judge Hall's last tie to the property was severed when he sold it to Samuel Dickson in 1860. By that date, Mr. Dickson's timber and lumber business was growing rapidly and he was acquiring all the land he could on both sides of the river for his mills, lumber yards and related activities. In 1870, while his own home at the south end of Dickson Street was in process of being built, Samuel drowned in his mill pound. His son-in-law, Thomas G. Hazlitt, became his executor and held his vast estate intact for many years. In fact, the Peterborough Lumber Company was still part of the Dickson estate until sold recently. Large homes were built on Dickson land for each of Samuel Dickson's daughters. This house at the north end of Dickson Street was built for his daughter, Elizabeth Davidson in 1877. It was held in trust for her until 1896 when she came into full possession.

She lived in the house with her daughter, Laura Jane, until her death on December 4, 1932. Miss Davidson became her heir and resided in the house until her death in September, 1957. However, a Grant made in 1951 established her niece, Helen Dickson Munro as joint tenant. Helen married G. Leslie McCrea and they continued as residents until Mrs. McCrea sold it to Lloyd G. Morrow in 1969. Mr. Morrow retained the property for almost two years, then sold it to Ralph and Margot Hull. Early photographs of the house show it to be very similar to the house John E. Belcher built for Dr. George Burnham on the South West corner of Water and McDonnel Street, as well as the slightly earlier house he designed for Colonel Harry C. Rogers at 266 Burnham Street. Although the dates cannot be confirmed, changes were made to the house. First, the porch was rebuilt.

Later it was glassed in and the low hipped roof was replaced by a higher gabled roof supported by brackets. Further alterations were made to the porch. The present owners have softened the hard lines of the latest porch so that it is more compatible with the style of the original house.

Architectural description for designation purposes:

This brick house, set on a granite foundation is two and a half storeys in height. The first and second storeys are divided by a brick string course; the top half storey being an attic. The windows in the first floor of the main house all have square topped head surrounds while the head surrounds in the second floor are segmental in shape. The house is rectangular in shape with a projection on the north side of the front facade. The projection contains a two storey three sided bay with three windows in each storey. The main central entrance and a window complete the front facade. The entrance contains a four panelled door surrounded by side lights and a transom which still retain the old floralpatterned stained glass. The doorway is completed by panelled reveals. These features are now hidden by a partially enclosed porch with decorative wood detailing and lead fenestration. The south facade has only a centrally placed chimney and a window in each of the first and second storeys located to the west of the chimney The east side of the main part of the main house has a bay window and a decorative single casement window in the lower storey, a double hung sash and a large, round topped landing window in the second storey and a gabled dormer in the attic storey.

The two storey wing, which protrudes to the east at right angles to the main house, has a door and a window in the first storey and a narrow, double hung sash window in the second. There is also a centrally placed chimney. The double storey attached coach house appears to be a single storey because its lower storey is below the foundation of main house. The coach house has two large and one small opening on the south facade and is partially covered by a porch which runs from the house proper, along the wing and along part of the coach house.

One of the large openings has French doors with side lights; the other, a pair of tongue and groove carriage doors. The end of this section has two small, single casement windows, one on each storey. The north side of the main house is three bays wide. All windows except one in the first storey have double hung sashes; the exception is a double casement window. The wing is flush with the house proper and has two double hung sash windows in the ground storey and a louvred, shuttered opening on the second. The coach house has a tongue and groove door at the ground level and three new openings in the second storey; a single glazed door, a pair of French doors with side lights and a square window. The former low hipped roof was replaced many years ago by a medium hipped roof which is broken by gables and dormers which contain windows to create a well lighted attic. A series of ornamented brackets decorate the soffits.

Of interest, it should be mentioned that this house has retained most of its original woodwork and graining as well as its early light fixtures and bathroom fittings. The changes made over the years, to the interior as well as the exterior have been sympathetic and have respected the architectural integrity of the building. A Victorian style, square picket fence surrounds the side garden.

236 Burnham St

Location and legal description:

Known municipally as 236 Burnham Street. August 21, 1975 - #286079 - "ALL and Singular that certain parcel or tract of land and premises, situate, lying and being in the City of Peterborough, in the County of Peterborough, and the Province of Ontario, and being composed of a part of Lots Number 1 and 2 south of James Street and East of Burnham Street, according to Registered Plan Number 1A for the said City; and which said parcel, being part of the lands described in Registered Instrument Number 32750, is shown bordered in red on the plan of survey attached to Registered Instrument Number 160507 and may be particularly described as follows:

BEARINGS herein are astronomic and are referred to the meridian through the south eastern angle of Lot Number 1 north of Maria Street and west of Mark Street according to said Registered Plan Number 1A;

COMMENCING at the north western angle of the said Lot Number 1 south of James Street and east of Burnham Street;

THENCE north 87 degrees 26 minutes east, along the northern limit if the said Lot and being along the southern limit of said James Street, a distance of 121.65 feet to a survey monument;

THENCE south 2 degrees 53 minutes east, being along the western limits of lands described in Registered Instrument Number 97032, a distance of 100.0 feet to a survey monument; THENCE north 87 degrees 26 minutes east, 2.5 feet to a survey monument;

THENCE south 1 degree 47 minute west, 101.53 feet, more or less, to a survey monument planted in the southern limit of said Lot Number 2 south of James Street; THENCE south 87 degrees 24 minutes 30 seconds west, along the last mentioned limit, a distance of 118.33 feet, more or less, to a survey monument planted in the eastern limit of the said Lot Number 2;

THENCE north 2 degrees 09 minutes west, along the western limits of the said Lots Number 2 and 1 south of James Street, and being along the eastern limit of said Burnham Street, a distance of 201.20 feet, more or less, to the point of commencement.

Original owner: William Snyder.

Owners and occupants: 1986: William van der Wel & Peter William van der Wel.

Date of construction: 1877

Architect: Probably John E. Belcher.

Significance:

The mansard roof, vertical lines, decorative window trim and brackets make Verulam the best example of the Second Empire style of private dwelling in Peterborough. Probably designed by local architect and engineer John E. Belcher, it was the home of John James Lundy, Peterborough's thirteenth mayor, for forty years. During his occupancy, the house was the social gathering place for many of the town's elite citizens.

Site and setting:

This large mansion stands on the top of a hill which originallyy had a “view of the exceptionally beautiful scenery, extending over lake and surrounding country... ". Sweeping lawns and terraces, decorated with Italian statues, descended to a large tennis court on the shore of Little Lake. Today, although the view is hidden by houses, the mansion still dominates the landscape due to its prominent location on the corner of Burnham and James Streets. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND: The history of this property begins three years before the Peter Robinson immigrants settled across the Otonabee River in 1825. In 1822 Nancy Randall was given the Crown Patent for 200 acres of land in Otonabee Township and which included this property. In 1825 she and her husband sold the whole 200 acres to Mark Burnham for £200. The following year Mark sold it to his brother Zaccheus for £400. In 1855, for the sum of £100, the 200 acres became the property of Rev. Mark Burnham the son of Zaccheus. Next, the records indicate that, although William Snyder was in possession of that portion of the 200 acres upon which his mansion was later erected in 1860, the deed of purchase from Rev. Mark Burnham was not registered until 1868. Verulam was not the first structure on this site; Sandford Fleming's 1846 PLAN OF PETERBOROUGH shows two large structures. They appear to be larger than houses. It would be interesting to discover what they were and who occupied them.

Verulam was built about 1877 for William Snyder who owned a lumber business in Peterborough. About 1850 the manufacturing of sawn lumber for the American market became big business in Peterborough and a number of saw mills were built along the Otonabee River taking advantage of the excellent water power generated in that stretch of river above Hunter Street. It was in this stretch of river that Mr. Snyder built his mill in 1852. Little is known about William Snyder except the bare statistics. The 1851 Census lists William, a lumberman, age 62, married to Catherine, age 57.

They have three unmarried children; Sarah, age 23, Edward, a clerk, age 20, and James, a printer, age 16. It is not recorded why William Snyder occupied this fine dwelling for only two years. In any event, he sold it to John James Lundy in 1879 for $1,986. The property remained part of the Lundy Estate until 1937 when it was sold to Mr. & Mrs. George Bigelow who converted it into the "Huntingdon Apartments". It later had several owners until it came into the possession of the Van der Wels in 1975. John James was the son of William and Margaret Lundy. William Lundy was born in Cavan, Ireland in 1801 and emigrated to Canada in 1819. He came to Peterborough in 1832 or 1833 where he started in business as a merchant tailor.

Within two years he also had a general store and became a distiller. During the 1837 Rebellion he was given an order for clothing for the regular forces, which was considered a large order for those times. In 1845 he built a tannery along Jackson Creek between Brock and Murray Streets west of Aylmer Street. This he operated until 1852 when the operation was carried on by his son Robert B. Lundy. This old stone tannery was demolished in 1951 to make space for a service station and garage. By carefully business management, William Lundy accumulated money and at the time of his death in 1878 was considered one of the country's wealthiest men.

When William Lundy died, his oldest son John James continued to operate the merchant business, located on the east side of George Street south of Simcoe Street, until 1833 when Robert Neill leased the property for his shoe store. He also took charge of and managed the family estate, as well as his own extensive property. At the time of his father's death the family consisted of his mother, three brothers and five sisters.

For over forty years much of the social life of Peterborough and Ashburnham centered around J.J. Lundy's home, Verulam. The famous musicals, the parties and the dances held by Mr. Lundy, who was a bachelor, and his sister Isabella (Bella) attracted the socially elite of the town. John James always appeared exceptionally well groomed.

He was driven daily to his office by his coachman. Incidentally, part of his coach house still stands on James Street; it has been converted into a three unit apartment. He and his sister Bella made five trips to Great Britain, spending several months at a time in the Old Country. On their last trip in 1899 they almost lost their lives when their ship the Scotsman sank. He was a member of St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church and was one of the early members, and master in 1874, of Corinthian Lodge 101 A.F. & A.M. He served for many years as a director and president of Little Lake Cemetery Company. J.J.'s first municipal service was in 1867 as captain in the volunteer fire brigade.

He was in charge of the company that operated the fire engine which was a hand worked double action pump with two cylinders and suction hose attached. In 1871 Mr. Lundy was elected to the town council and re-elected the following two years. In 1874 he was appointed to the Town Trust Commission, resigning in 1886. He was elected mayor by acclimation in 1879, just at the time when Canada was coming out of a severe depression. Because of his business abilities, he received a second acclimation as mayor in 1880. In 1882 he ran for a seat in the Federal parliament but was defeated. John James died on March 11, 1918 at the age of 84 years. His sister, Isabella, and brother, Douglas J. (Duke) continued to occupy Verulam until their deaths in 1924. Until it was purchased by the Bigelows in 1937 it remained part of the Lundy estate. For the most part it remained vacant except for vagrants who occupied it from time to time.

Those were depression years and any shelter was eagerly sought. When the George Bigelows purchased the house in 1937 it was in sad shape. After much careful restoration and renovation it became the Huntingdon Apartments and was beautifully cared for. Unfortunately circumstances required the removal of the front and rear verandas and removal of doors and windows from the rear. originallyy the front and the rear were identical. Later owners let the structure deteriorate until the Van der Wels became the owners. They are to be greatly commended for the care they have exercised in bringing it back to its former grandeur.

Architectural description for designation by-law:

The main house is rectangular in shape. Two storeys of solid brick construction stand on a cut granite sill which rests in a foundation of broken coursed cut stone. A high, four sided mansard roof forms the third storey. Frontispieces, three storeys in height, protrude from the center of both the front and rear facades. A three sided, three storey bay is centrally located in the west facade. A kitchen wing is attached to the east side of the main house. It consists of two sections, neither of which is as wide nor as high as the main house. The first section is centrally attached to the main structure, has one solid brick storey on a stone foundation and a second storey with a mansard roof on the front and rear and is finished on the east end with a gabled parapet. The second section is also solid brick, one storey high with a flat roof; the rear wall is flush with the first wing section while the front wall is stepped back.

The brick work is all stretcher bond without decorations except for plain recessed panels above the second storey windows in the west bay and the label head surrounds on all windows in the main house. The mansard roofs are of sheet metal scored to resemble large shingles. These roofs rest on wide decorated entablatures supported by decorative brackets of several sizes.

The house has five single stacked chimneys, four on the main house and one on the first wing section. Those on the main house have paired arched and plain rectangular panels, string courses and other decorative brick trim. The one on the wing is plain and is located at the peak of the parapet gabled end. All the openings on the first storey of the main house are semicircular in shape. On the second storey they are segmental in shape.

The centre windows on the west bay are paired. All openings on the wing sections are rectangular in shape. The windows in the mansard storey are set into decorated dormers, with alternating curved and plain pediments on the main house and plain pediments on the wing. The dormer windows on the main house are segmental in shape and those in the wing are flat.

The main entrance is in the centre of the main, or north facade. It is the same height as the windows, but wider. It contains a double leaf, multi-panel door with glass lights.

Pagoda Bridge (Jackson Park)

Location and legal description:

The PAGODA BRIDGE is located in Jackson Park which is located east of Monaghan Road and north of Parkhill Road. It spans a section of Jackson Park Creek which runs through the park. The Registered Legal Description of Jackson Park is: Lot #1 West of Communication Road, formerly the Township of Smith now in the City of Peterborough, Concession 13, Registered Plan #17T, City of Peterborough.

Original owner: Nicholls Park Trust

Owner: 1987: City of Peterborough.

Date of construction: 1894-1895.

Architect: John E. Belcher

Site and setting:

Jackson Park is situated in the northwest part of the city, in a valley created by Jackson Park Creek. The Pagoda Bridge, the outstanding structure within the park, is located at the south end of an artificial lake. It spans the spillway from the lake which is in the southeast quarter of the park.

Significance:

This unique structure is an architectural gem which adds greatly to the heritage of our city and our province. It is a fine example of Victorian Garden Architecture which was popular in the nineteenth century. The value of this Pagoda Bridge is intrinsic and cannot be measured in monetary terms and every effort should be made to preserve and restore it.

Historical background:

The survey of Smith Township was completed in 1818. In that year, six families, all originating from Alston, Cumberland, England, arrived to take up land in the township. Known as the "Colony Settlers", they had sailed from Whitehaven on the Jason on May 17, 1818. The sea voyage and difficult journey, via Rice Lake and the Otonabee River, took all summer and they arrived in the wilderness too late to settle on their land. They spent the winter of 1818-1819 in a communal log shanty they built on the triangle of land now bounded by Stewart Street and Parkhill and Chemong Roads. In the spring they took up their land grants along the Communication Road, now Chemong Road.

At this time, the Colony Settlers were the only inhabitants of this region. Adam Scott built his mill and home to the south, on the Otonabee River, in 1819 and the Stewart and Reid families arrived in Douro Township in 1822.

William Dixon Sr., his wife Nancy Chesterfield and their family of five sons, drew their land grants immediately north of the town line between Smith and North Monaghan Townships (later Peterborough). During the first few years of hardship there were deaths in nearly all six Colony families.

In the Dixon family, the youngest son, Utrick, and the oldest son, Isaac, died within two years. Three years later, the father, William, died leaving his sons to carry on; William Junior being eighteen or nineteen at the time. The family did carry on and thrived. William married Isabella Harvey in 1829, at which time the Dixon property was divided. William retained the west 165 acres and one of his brothers, Joseph, acquired the east 100 acres

William built a saw mill on Dixon's Creek, which became a very important adjunct of the new settlement. William, also opened a quarry along one bank of the valley through which the stream flowed. The stone from this quarry was used to build a number of buildings and foundations in the Town of Peterborough, which was developing south of his property. His own home was one of four dwellings erected in 1837 using stone from his quarry. The use of the stone from this quarry either ended or was drastically reduced by 1849. In that year William died, leaving his wife, Isabella, who lived to be more than 80 years old.

James, son of William, lived his entire life on this property. He married Lucy Crawford and they had seven children. A fourth generation was born and raised here before the last of the property passed out of the Dixon family. In 1872 James deeded the property, except for parts sold, to his wife Lucy Jane Dixon. In 1890 Charlotte Jane Nicholls died leaving an estate close to a million dollars.

Nearly half of this was left in the form of bequests for charitable, educational and public purpose’s. $60,000 was allocated for the purchase and improvement of public parks and recreational grounds. In early April, 1893, the executors of Mrs. Nicholls' estate asked for tenders for lands for park purposes. The terms of the tender was published in the PETERBOROUGH REVIEW on April 4, 1893. On October 4, 1893, Lucy Jane Dixon sold 30 acres of land to the Nicholls Park Trust for $3,000. There are several stories concerning this sale. One tells that pressure to buy the valley with its creek came from E.H.D. Hall, an executor, who remembered the many happy hours he spent as a boy fishing in the creek and roaming the woods.

Another story says that no pressure was needed; that Mrs. Dixon sold the desired land for a very low sum of money as her contribution to the park. When first purchased, it was called Dixon Park, but in mid July, 1894, the name changed to Jackson Park. It was either named after Mrs. Nicholls, whose maiden name was Jackson, or after her nephew, Benjamin Jackson. In 1894 John E. Belcher, who was the Town's Engineer and the architect for many of its finest homes and public buildings, was listed as the architect/planner for the park.

It was reported that the Dam was built that year and it can be assumed that the bridges were built at the same time using plans provided by Mr. Belcher. It was an era when "rustic" garden architecture was popular, as illustrated in an article in the Peterborough EXAMINER in April, 1893 which shows a bridge which could have inspired the design for the Jackson Park Pagoda Bridge as well as a second bridge which spanned the creek. Its design was similar to the lower railing portion of the Pagoda Bridge. Newspaper reports indicate that the work on the park was completed in the early summer of 1895. A very glowing description of the park appeared in the City Incorporation Edition of the PETERBOROUGH EXAMINER on June 30, 1905.

See the Appendix for a transcription. At one time, Jackson Park was the city's athletic center. There were many canoe races on the lake and some of the teams even entered the Henley Regatta in England. The creek was dammed for swimming in the summer. The park also had picnic areas and a popular toboggan slide in the winter. When moving pictures were introduced, an outdoor screen was built in the park and hundreds came out to watch the shows. The street railway operated a line out to Parkhill Road, just south of the park. A skating rink was built in its turning basin.

The Nicholls Park Trust purchased land for two other parks. In 1894 Nicholls Oval was bought from the Samuel Dickson Company for $13,000. About the same time they bought Inverlea for $12,000. These two parks were turned over to the city in 1938. However, it was not until Stanley McBride was Mayor of Peterborough in 1961 and 1962 that Jackson Park, now 45 acres in size, and a trust fund of $50,000 in bonds was turned over to the city. An agreement was drawn up to insure that the city would use the property as a park, maintain it properly, and keep its name.

The small bridge across the creek is now replaced by a concrete span, but the Pagoda Bridge remains. For over ninety years it has been admired and cherished by the people of Peterborough. Now, like many of our city's older citizens, it is in need of loving care and attention. Let us hope it can be restored and saved for the enjoyment of future generations.

Architectural description for designation by-law:

The bridge over a section of Jackson Creek is not, in fact a pagoda or even a close resemblance to a pagoda (which is invariably polygonal, with multi-storied ornamental roofs). It is in fact a structure typical of the Victorian era and its detailing (i.e. brackets, trim finials, etc.) is very typical of the architecture and construction of the same era in English Canada. The curved hipped roof gives the structure a somewhat oriental character and this is likely the reason for the misnomer. The structure is a fine example of Victorian Garden Architecture, in the same genre as gazebos, pavilions, greenhouses and conservatories, and it is, in fact, a covered bridge spanning approximately 20 feet of water.

The balustrade acts as a truss consisting of a bottom chord (wooden timber) and posts which also support the roof. Intermediate joists which support the deck bear on the abutment and on cross purlins which are bolted to the two centre posts. Each post has four brackets which support the roof structure. Decorative brackets tie the exterior of the post to the cross purlin below. The fascia is also decorative and similar to the bargeboard on homes of the same era. The roof boasts tiny dormers which appear to be birdhouses and the ridge sports two finials. The original roofing was most likely cedar shingles. Old photographs provide excellent references to the original details of the structure and will be of great help in the restoration of this historical and architectural gem.

332-344 Rubidge St

Location and legal description:

This property is known municipally as 332,334,336,338,340,342,344,Rubidge Street. It is legally described as follows:

ALL AND SINGULAR that certain parcel or tract of land and premises situate, lying and being in the City of Peterborough, in the County of Peterborough and Province of Ontario, and being composed of part of Lot No. 13 on the north side of Charlotte Street and west of George Street in the said city, and part of Lot No. 13 on the south side of Simcoe Street and west of George Street in the said city, and more particularly described as follows:

COMMENCING at a point in the weste~n limit of Lot 13 south of Simcoe Street and west of George Street distant one hundred thirty feet southerly from the nooth west angle thereof;

THENCE southerly along the western limits of the said Lot Simcoe Street and west of George Street an~of the said Lot Charlotte Street and west of George Street to a point distant northerly from the south west angle of the said Lot 13 north Street and west of George Street;

THENCE easterly and parallel to the southern limit of the said Lot 13 north of Charlotte Street one hundred feet;

THENCE southerly and parallel to the eastern limit of the said Lot 13 north of Charlotte Street eighty feet to the southern limit of the said lot;

THENCE easterly along the southern limit of said lot fourteen feet more or less to the south easterly angle of the said lot;

THENCE northerly along the eastern limits of the said Lot 13 Charlotte Street and/of{~--said Lot 13 south of Simcoe Street to distant one hundred andAfee~ southerly from the north east angle of Lot 13 south of Simcoe Street;

THENCE westerly and parallel to the northern limit of the said Lot 13 south of Simcoe Street to the place of beginning.

SUBJECT to a right-of-way over a lane more particularly described as follows: .

COMMENCING at the south easterly angle of Lot 13 north of Charlotte Street and west of George Street in the said city;

THENCE westerly along the southern limit of the said lot to a point distant one hundred feet easterly from the south west angle thereof;

THENCE northerly and parallel to the eastern limit of the said lot eight feet;

THENCE easterly and parallel to the southern limit of the said lot to the eastern limit thereof; 

THENCE southerly along the eastern limit of the said lot to the south east angle thereof.

Origianl owner: George A. Cox (Central Canada Loan & Savings Company)

Owner, 1986: William Maxwell Comstock

Date of construction:

Architect and builder: Probably the Architectural Firm of Wilmot and Stewart.

Site and setting:

The spectacular architectural style of this terrace forms an eye catching vista which pleasantly dominates the buildings on this busy artery between Charlotte and Simcoe Streets.

Significance:

Cox Terrace is the finest remaining example of the Second Empire style row housing in Canada. By uniting the individual units into a scheme of balanced projecting pavilions, the architect has avoided the monotonous repetition often found in row housing. It stands as a monument to George A. Cox, a wealthy Peterborough insurance baron and entrepreneur, who had it built as an investment property.

Historical background:

George Cox's family moved from England to the United States in 1810, and then on to Canada at a later date. George was born in and received his early education at the Colborne Grammar School. When he was about 18 years old, he moved to Peterborough as an operator with the Montreal Telegraph Company. During the thirty years he lived in Peterborough, his accomplishment were numerous and exceptional. While working as a telegraph clerk, he also went into business on George Street as a "photographist, ambrotypist," etc. He seems to have held more jobs than any three men of his times. Eventually he took on duties as the local agent for the Canada Life Assurance Company and rose to become a director and later the president of the company. In 1883 he organized a Peterborough company called The Central Canada Loan and Savings Company, which took over The Peterborough Real Estate and Investment Company. George A. Cox was instrumental in bringing the Edison Electric company, later to become the Canadian General Electric Company, to Peterborough. One of his notable works for the community was his effort to improve railway service in this city. It took him just five years to revive the Midland Railway when, in 1878, it became bankrupt. In 1887, upon becoming president of The Canadian Bank of Commerce, he moved to Toronto. By 1907 he was director of twenty-eight financial and commercial companies. He died in Toronto in 1914. George A. Cox was actively politically. At the age of 32 he was acclaimed Mayor of Peterborough and, within the next thirteen years, occupied the office of Mayor three more times, once more by acclamation. In 1875 he ran for a seat in the Ontario Legislature and in 1887 was a candidate for a seat in the Federal House, but lost out both times. Following the election of the Laurier Government (Liberal) in 1896, Mr. Cox was elevated to the Canadian Senate.

Little is known about his personal life. He was a member of the Charlotte Street Methodist Church. Largely through his assistance, both the Y.W.C.A. and the Peterborough Protestant Home were erected. He is known to have erected a number of buildings in Peterborough, which were examples of the best current architectural styles. Some are business blocks on George Street, others are dwellings. The Second Empire terrace on Rubidge Street, which is the subject of this brief, is his most outstanding architectural contribution to the city. His own home occupied the block now bounded by Weller and Walton Streets and Belmont and Homewood Avenues. Hunter Street West now cuts through where his house stood.

Description of building for designation by-law:

This row related rectangular terrace consists of seven dwellings. Three of the units are three storeys high and four units have two storeys. The center pavilion and the two end units have four sided mansard roofs, which provide the broken roof line indicative of the Second Empire style. The four two storey units between the three larger units have shingle gable roofs. The mansards on the two end units have straight sides whereas the one in the center has a conical shape and rests on a parapet, making it higher. Each of the seven units has an attached kitchen; there are two together on the north end; they are two storeys in height and share one chimney.

The next two repeat their northern neighbour with the addition of a wooden leanto shed. The next kitchen is a single unit with a chimney and a lean-to shed. The two remaining kitchens on the south end are three storeys in height, the top storey being a three-sided mansard; they share a common chimney and a lesan-to shed (six units). All the mansards are shingled. There are six chimneys on the main building and four on the kitchen wings. They are all single stacks which contain two flues. Those on the main house are decorated with recessed panels whereas the taller chimneys on the kitchen wing have string course trim. On the main structure, the chimneys are located as follows: one on each end of the building, one on either side of the center mansard and one in the center of each of the intervening gable units.

This solid brick structure rests on a foundation of broken course cut stone. The cream co loured brick is laid in stretcher bond and is now painted. The two end and the center units are divided by recessed units. Those on each end have wide, shallow end projections on both the brick and the mansard storeys. The center unit has a central three-sided bay located on the second and mansard storeys. Each of the four recessed units has a three sided bay located on the second storey. A string course divides the first and second storeys. The roof eaves are trimmed with a decorated frieze and numerous brackets. Every corner on the front facade is decorated with raised brick quoins.

With the exception of the three windows in the central bay, all windows in the brick part of the structure have flat tops. The three in bay have segmental tops. All have voussoir head surrounds and lug sills. The mansard storeys are lighted by windows set into decorative semicircular and round dormers.

Each unit has a separate entrance, which contains a double leaf door; each leaf containing one decorated lower panel and a decorated segmental topped glass panel above.

Each unit has its own porch, which adjoins its neighbour creating a continuous verandah effect. There is a small pediment on each of the two end porches.

604 George St N

Location and legal description:

The property is known municipally as 604 George St. and is legally described as follows:

ALL AND SINGULAR that certain parcel or tract of land and premises situate lying and being in the City of Peterborough, in the County of Peterborough and Province of Ontario, and being composed of parts of Lot numbers 1 and 2 north of Dublin Street and, east of George Street in the said City of Peterborough, described as follows:

COMMENCING at the southwest angle" of Lot Number 1;

THENCE northerly along the western limit of said Lot 32 feet;

THENCE easterly parallel with the southern limits of said Lots numbers 1 and 2 to a point 112 feet westerly from the eastern limit of said Lot Number 2 and being the western limit of the right of way hereinafter mentioned;

THENCE southerly along the western limit of said right of way 32 feet to the southern limit of said Lot Number 2;

THENCE westerly along the southern limits of said Lots Numbers 2 and 1 to the place of beginning, together with the use of a lane from Dublin Street to the northerly limit of the land hereby conveyed which lane is described as follows:

COMMENCING on the north side of Dublin Street at a point distant 100 feet westerly from the southeast angle of said Lot Number 2;

THENCE northerly parallel with the eastern limit of said Lot Number 2, 32 feet;

THENCE westerly parallel with the southern limit of said Lot Number 2, 12 feet;

THENCE southerly parallel with the eastern limit of Number 2, 32 feet to Dublin Street and thence easterly north side of Dublin street to the place of beginning, said right of way forms part of said Lot Number 2 north of Dublin Street and east of George Street.

Original owner: Mr. & Mrs. J. S. Knapman

Owner and occupants: 1987: Louis A. & Karen E. Taylor

Date of construction: 1910 ARCHITECT: unknown

Builder: J. S. Knapman

Site and setting:

It is located on main thoroughfare coming into Peterborough from the north in a residential area of good compatible single dwellings. Its location on a corner lot is an ideal setting for the band-shell shaped veranda. The site and setting has changed little since the house was erected.

Significance:

This has been the home of the Turners, who are one of Peterborough’s most prominent families, the birth place of Mr. John Turner MPP. Architecturally it has a perfectly preserved band-shell parch. The interior is also perfectly preserved in Edwardian style. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND: 604 George St. started out as a ½ acre lot originallyy patented by The Crown to James Henderson an October 26, 1843. James Henderson, after 15 years of possession sold it to Leon Caisse. Leon Caisse was just one of many who owned the 1/2 acre property. Lean Caisse was an Inn Keeper who owned and operated Caisse Hotel in 1858, at the corner of Water St. and Hunter St. Peterborough. William Langford was the last owner of the whole 1/2 acre lot. He began to sell off separate pieces, one being the property an which 604 George now stands. William Langford said it to John S. & Annie A. Knapman who built the house in 1910. The Knapmans then sold it to Joseph Pollard. Joseph Pollard owned it far two years before he sold it to E. Melville Turner.

The Turner family, beginning with William Rutherford Turner all lived in Peterborough. William R. Turner was a tinsmith who worked at the old Adam Hall Foundry. He left there approximately in 1910 to establish his own firm of W.R. Turner and Sons. His sons were S. Roy, Rutherford (Ford) and Ernest Melville. Ford and Mel Turner carried on the family business. Ernest Melville who was born in Peterborough attended public school and Peterborough Collegiate and Vocational Institute. He then joined the plumbing and heating firm W.R. Turner & Sons, and became president and general manager. In addition to his two periods on City Council from 1922 - 1926 and 1931 - 1932, he was active in fraternal organizations. He was a director of Little Lake Cemetery Company. He was Past Master and life member of Peterborough Lodge, 155 AF and AM charter member of William James Dunlap Lodge, 675 AF, and Ami; a member of Corinthian Chapter RAM; past preceptor of Moore Preceptory, Knights Templar; member of Peterborough Lodge of Perfection and of Peterborough Chapter of Rose Croix. Mel took a keen interest in municipal affairs and when an alderman he was chairman of the Fire, Water and Light committee.

He was a member of St. Paul’s Presbyterian church and for many years served on the board of managers and also on several occasions was Chairman of the Board. He married Ola M. Morris also of Peterborough, who was of Irish descent. Together they raised three children at 604 George St., Dorothy, John, and Arthur. Dorothy married Reverend Leonard P. Holman, an Anglican missionary. They spent many years in Aklavik, and Inuvik NWT.

While there Reverend Holman was also School Administrator, Juvenile Magistrate and, at one time, Mayor of Inuvik. Dorothy was Matron of the schools he administered. They retired in 1974 and moved back to Peterborough. It was ten years after Reverend Holman passed away, when Dorothy sold the property to the present owners Louis A. & Karen E. Taylor in 1984. She moved to 484 Gilmour st. where she passed away in 1986. - John M. Turner MPP, was born at 604 George St. He married June Gadd of Peterborough, whose parents originallyy came from Toronto, when her father joined CGE as an engineer. John was also a RCAP Veteran in the Second World War. After the war he worked in the family business on into the 1970's. He also served on the Peterborough City Council for two terms beginning in 1969. As an MPP, John was also appointed parliamentary assistant to the to the provincial secretary for justice in 1974, parliamentary assistant to the Ministry of Health in 1978. The highlight of his career was Speaker of the Ontario Legislature from 19811985. John has been Peterborough's Conservative member of the Provincial Parliament for fourteen years.

Although he has retired from Provincial politics in 1987, John's interest will always be to better Peterborough economically and he continues to have a strong interest in his community. John & June Turner have six children and four grandchildren. The Turner family continues to live in Peterborough. Dr. Arthur M. Turner is also one of Peterborough's outstanding citizens. He attended Central School and Peterborough Collegiate and Vocational Institute before he went on to the University of Toronto. Dr. Turner took his internship at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, and also Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto. Dr. Turner specializes in internal medicine and is practicing at The Medical Center. Dr. Turner married Martha J. Loucks and they have two boys. Some members of the Turner family have lived at 604 George St. for sixty-four years. They have provided many memorable contributions to the City of Peterborough. The Turners of the past as well as the present are splendid examples of Peterborough's finest families.

Exterior description for designation by-law:

604 George Street is a single, detached, three storey dwelling with a rectangular shape and a short facade. There is a full, above ground level basement built of stone. The main exterior wall material is red brick stretcher bond. The roof is asphalt shingled hip with two dormers on the north side, one dormer on the east side and one dormer on the west side, centered in a gable. The dormers each have a hip roof with one recessed window, wood trim and wood lug sills. On the south side there -is a gable, faced with wood shingles, the shingles extending in a. bell curve to the eaves over the projecting two storey bay. The gable contains a Palladian window with wide wood trim. The roof has projecting eaves with plain fascia, wooden tongue and groove soffit and simple moulded frieze. The main entrance is off centre to the left. The door is oak with a large oval pane of bevelled glass within a rectangular frame. There is a plain glass transom above, on which the numbers 604 have been painted. They are not the original painted numbers. There is a large window on the first floor on the front facade with a fixed pane and a leaded, stained glass panel above. The wood trim under the panel is decorated.

The second storey on the front facade has a window above the front door. There is a wooden bay under the gable, containing three windows with four wooden pilasters. These three windows all have a moveable lower sash with nine small panes fixed above, as well as the window on the left. There is a one storey verandah across the front facade fashioned in an unusual and attractive style. From the south-west corner of the house, a circular dome with tin roof joins the sloping verandah roof. This dome is supported by brackets under a plain soffit and a dentilled frieze. Beautiful bulbous columns with Doric capitals standing on brick piers topped with stone hold up the verandah roof and dome. The columns are joined across the length of the verandah by gracefully contoured railings and turned posts. The floor is wooden. This distinctive verandah is one of three in Peterborough in this bandshell style. On the south side of the house, on the first floor in the bay, there is a wide window, centered between two long windows. This center window has a fixed pane with a leaded, stained glass panel above. There are also two other windows on this side on the first floor. These two windows and the two in the bay all have a moveable lower sash with a leaded, stained glass panel above. The windows on the south side on the second storey all have a moveable lower sash with nine small panes fixed above. All the windows on the west and south sides of the house have rough cut brick voussoirs and rough cut stone lug sills, excepting, of course, the palladian window and the dormers. There is a two storey verandah on the east side. The upper verandah is supported by bulbous columns on wooden bases on a wooden floor. Both verandahs have plain railings with squared posts. There is an off center door to the right on the first floor and a window to its right.

This window has one moveable lower sash with a plain fixed pane above. To the left, a wooden bay, containing three windows each with a moveable lower sash and leaded, stained glass panels above. There is an off center door on the second storey, leading to the verandah and one two sash window. There is a door at the bottom of the steps from ground level, leading to the basement at the north east corner of this east side of the house. The north side contains six sash windows. There are two round windows, poised between first and second storeys with brick voussoirs all around, which, together with a first storey window are leaded, stained glass. All windows and doors on the north and east sides, being in positions not as important as those on the street sides, (i.e.) the west and south, have plain brick voussoirs and wooden lug sills. There are seven basement windows, which are barred. All the windows and doors on this house are flat shape with plain wood trim. There is a centered single brick chimney. A garage for one car lies behind the east side of the house. It has a cement floor and a side door and two windows.

George Street United Church (534 George St N)

Location and legal description:

Lots one and two east of George Street and north of McDonnell Street

ORIGINAL OWNER Trustees of the McDonnell Street Congregation of the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada.

OWNERS AND OCCUPANTS IN 1990: Trustees of the George Street United Church

DATE CONSTRUCTION COMMENCED: 1873

ARCHITECT: Henry Langley BUILDERS: William Lasher, foundation David Carlisle, Bricklaying Fred Reeves, Plaster William Toole, Roof Erasmus Greene, interior woodwork

Significance:

This is the only example of the work of the noted Toronto architect Henry Langley in Peterborough. It is also the only example of this particular style of Gothic Revival, influenced by the designs of Gilbert Scott in England. The church occupies a prominent site in the downtown area and is an important element in the civic center area which is the northern gateway to the downtown business district. The tall tower of the church can be seen from many vantage points both in the city and on its outskirts.

History:

Throughout its history George Street United Church has occupied three different buildings on three different sites. The first church was a small frame building erected in 1837 to serve the Methodist congregation of Peterborough. This stood on the property at 539 George Street North, now the Kaye Funeral Home. In 1843 a second and more sizeable church was required, and a stuccoed timber frame building was erected just south of the earlier church. Later this would serve as the parish house and the Sunday school. Today, clad with brick, it is the apartment house at 525-527 George Street. By 1872 the size of the congregation had grown sufficiently to warrant a larger and more suitable building. The Methodist fathers approached Mr. William Cluxton, who owned and occupied a house across George Street on lots 1 and 2, east of George and north of McDonnell. Mr. Cluxton agreed to sell his property to the church and to move his house around the corner to what is now 543 Water Street. The third church is indeed a very handsome structure. It was designed by the architect Henry Langley and closely resembles his Metropolitan Church in Toronto. Late in 1873 the basement was dug; in 1874 the building was closed in; and in 1875 the church was ready for use. The total cost of the building was $60,000. It was formally dedicated on Christmas Day 1875. In 1891 the tower, part of the original design, was completed, and the church appeared very much as it does today. Over the years most of the changes have taken place inside. The present very fine organ is actually the third one, installed in 1931 along with the panelled choir screen. In 1947 a new floor was laid in the sanctuary, and the present arrangement of two rows of pews with a center aisle was initiated. The chimes in the tower and the floodlighting were added in the mid-1960s.

Description for designation:

This impressive church in the gothic style occupies an important site in what might be called the civic center of Peterborough, diagonally across from Confederation Park and just north of the City Hall. Its site is bounded by George Street on the west, McDonnell Street to the south, and Water Street to the east. The axis runs from west to east, and the main entrance is on the west or George Street facade. The church is built in the form of a Latin cross, with an apse at the east end and eastern transepts. The angles between the apse and the transepts are occupied by two-story rectangular projections to accommodate stairways. At the west end the extensions of a narthex one bay beyond the north and south facades create the appearance of western transepts. A tall tower projects from the center of the front or west facade. The building is built of grey or buff brick laid variously in stretcher or common bond. A full-height foundation of rock-faced cut and coursed white limestone with quoining and banding of darker limestone is capped by a course of smoothed cut limestone. The steeply-pitched roof was perhaps originallyy covered with cedar shingles, but for some years they have been replaced with asphalt shingles, now partially covered with copper. The eaves are supported by a heavily moulded wooden cornice above a corbelled brick frieze. On the gable of the west front there is a brick frieze of pendants and small pointed arches. The West Façade

The west facade consists of three bays under a gabled roof. At each side there are angle buttresses with sloping limestone caps at the level of the second story and at the top. In the basement the two side bays contain narrow windows with segmental head surrounds which are part of the top course of smoothed limestone, and the sides of the window openings are decorated with alternating large and small darker limestone blocks. There are narrow lancet windows in each of the two upper stories crowned with pointed wooden hood- moulds resting on round cast-iron imposts decorated with patterns of vines and leaves. The broad sloping sills are smooth limestone. A metal eaves-trough painted grey gives the visual effect of a string course between the first and second stories. The center bay of this facade is occupied by the projecting tower. There are angle buttresses at each corner. The basement and first story of the front of the tower are occupied by the main doorway. This is recessed within a pointed archway surmounted by a gable pierced by a circular opening just below its peak. The gable is capped with a wooden moulding, presumably a replacement for an earlier moulding decorated with a fleur-de-Iys at the apex like that which still exists on the north door of the narthex.

The pointed wooden hood-mould above the archway has been removed, but the iron imposts on which it rested still remain. Within the arch two ribs of moulded brick rest at either side on wooden colonnettes with limestone capitals and bases. The doorway, with a segmental arched top, is set in a wooden frame which also includes a tympanum with a large quatrefoil window with double cusps and two smaller trefoil windows. These windows are filled with stained glass. The present doors of vertical tongued-and-grooved boards are not original, but the original ornate wrought-iron strap-work hinges have been applied to them as decoration. There are no openings in the basement or first story on either the north or south sides of the tower. A broad sloped and projecting limestone string course is carried around the tower between the first and second stories of the tower and slopes up to become the sills of narrow lancets on the north and south sides and on the west of a large pointed window with wooden tracery. All of these have pointed wooden hood-moulds resting on decorated iron imposts. At the height of the springing of the arch of the west window the buttresses decrease in size and are capped with three sloping limestone blocks. The frieze of pendants and pointed arches is carried from the gable around the facades at top of the second story of the tower and above it on each facade there are broad sloping ledges covered with grey-painted metal. At this height metal eavestroughing painted grey is carried around the buttresses, giving the effect of a string course. The low third story of the tower contains on each of the north, west, and south sides three narrow lancets with wooden frames and sills. At the top a sloping projecting limestone string course is carried around walls and buttresses. This course marks the top of the original tower. The tall fourth story is the belfry and contains on each of its four sides two lancet openings filled with wooden louvers. These openings have pointed limestone hood-moulds. A narrow melded limestone string course separates the wall of this story from a frieze of small recessed roundtopped panels, which in turn is surmounted by a melded limestone string course.

Between the lancets on each side there is a triangular pier which rests on stone imposts below the string-course crowning the story below. On the west side the impost is a sculpted head of John Wesley. The tower is crowned by a brick parapet with a limestone coping which is stepped down toward the center of each facade. There are tall octagonal pinnacles at each corner with conical limestone caps, and in the center of each side are lower diagonally-set square pinnacles, also with limestone caps which rest on the triangular piers between the belfry openings. The South Façade The south facade is terminated on the west by the projection of the narthex. Its end is rectangular in the basement and first story, and angle buttresses at the corners extend through the two stories. There is a double- leaved door at ground level set in a double pointed archway of brick. The doors themselves are new, but here too the original strap-work hinges have been used decoratively. Above the door the tympanum is filled with wooden tracery. This doorway originallyy had a pointed wooden hood mould, which has been removed. However, the iron imposts on which it rested still remain. Above this is a gable-shaped wooden moulding which has no doubt replaced a moulding terminated by a fleur-de-lys like that on the north door. A continuation of the metal eavestroughing on the west facade separates the first and second stories of the narthex and sloping limestone caps at the corners make the transition to the threesided end of the second story. A single lancet fills the central bay of the second story and has a wooden hood mould resting on iron imposts. The nave facade consists of four bays, separated by buttresses extending to the cornice with sloping limestone caps at the top and at two lower points where the buttress width decreases.

Between the first and second bay the buttress is built against a chimney protruding partly from the wall. This chimney has been removed above the cornice. Each bay contains a tall pointed window with wooden tracery and a wooden hood mould resting on iron imposts. The sloping window sills are limestone. Below these are double casement windows with limestone sills and segmental arched tops of radiating voussoirs which form part of the top basement course of smoothed limestone. Their sides are decorated with alternating large and small blocks of darker limestone. At the eastern end of this facade is the projecting three-sided transept with buttresses at the angles. The three sides of the end of the transept complete this facade. Fenestration in the transept is like that of the nave in both basement and upper stories. The North Façade The north facade is essentially the same as the south, though it is broken by the extension of the parish house from the first nave bay.

The East End The eastern end is dominated by the three-sided end of the chancel, which was originallyy fenestrated like the transept. However the pointed windows have been blocked up with brick, although hood-moulds, imposts, and sills remain. Probably the windows were blocked when the organ was moved from the rear gallery to the front of the church in 1884. North and south rectangular stairway pavilions fill the corner between the apse and the transepts. On the east these have narrow casements in the basement and lancets with hood-moulds in the first story. To the north and south respectively there are doorways halfway between the basement and first story which are reached by flights of steps. Above them between first and second stories are lancets. These pavilions have corbelled brick friezes and wooden cornice mouldings. Between the tops of their hipped roofs and the cornice of the transepts can be seen a few courses of chimneys which have been removed above the cornice. Interior The main sanctuary of the church is rectangular and is roofed with a depressed barrel vault of plaster. Plaster ribs dividing the ceiling into bays extend from one side to the other, resting on a moulded plaster cornice which runs along the top of the walls at the height of the springing of the vault and on plaster imposts in the Corinthian style. Short transverse pointed vaults extend out to meet the tops of the pointed nave windows. There are two pendant plaster ventilator grills in the ceiling. A transverse pointed vault extends across the arms of the transepts central rib meets the three ribs of the tripartite end vault junctions marked by plaster bosses. At the crossing a boss also marks the junction of the transept rib with those of the nave and of the pointed vault of the chancel. The plaster of the walls in the auditorium and the narthex is scored to resemble stone. A balcony, which extends around the back and sides of the sanctuary and curves into the transepts, cuts across the centers of the tall windows, which are filled with borders of stained glass and grisaille. The framework of the windows is wood, as are the broad sloping sills.

The balcony is supported by decoratively pierced triangular iron brackets set into the outside walls and resting on moulded plaster imposts, and also by cast iron columns with Corinthian capitals at the rear and at the transepts. Along the sides the balcony holds three rows of sets, but widens in the transepts to four rows and at the rear to six. In the transepts the balcony still retains what appear to be the original pine bench pews with cast iron ends. The balustrade of the balcony is of pine, carved and pierced with a design of trefoil shapes. At the rear a large central traceried window containing stained glass is framed on either side by smaller lancets. The view of the chancel is completely blocked by a carved oak screen and organ case which extends nearly to the vault. This screen was installed in 1931 to house a new organ. At the foot of the screen, on a platform three steps above the level of the main auditorium, is the carved oak pulpit and in front of it the altar and the benches for the choir. All of these were installed in 1931 or after. Narthex The narthex is entered from the ground level through the western door and a vestibule which has a ceiling of tongued and grooved boards in a rectangular pattern with four pendants. The vestibule is separated from the main hall of the narthex by a broad wooden doorway over which there is a tympanum filled with wooden tracery. Stairs rise to either side in single flights to large landings on the level of the auditorium. From that level flights that curve 180 degrees ascend to the level of the gallery. The stair balustrades are of oak, with turned balusters and newels.

73 Robinson St

Location and legal description:

The lands and buildings are known municipally as 73 Robinson Street. All and singular that certain parcel of land and premises situate lying and being in the City of Peter borough and County of Peterborough and Province of Ontario and being composed of Lot #133 south of Robinson Street and the westerly twentyfive feet in perpendicular width of Lots #1 and #2 south of Robinson Street and west of Mark Street on Plan 11A for the said City of Peterborough. (Instrument #391000)

Site and setting:

The house is located on the south side of Robinson Street between Burnham and Mark Streets in that area of Peterborough formerly known as the village of Ashburnham. It is set on the side of a gentle slope well back from and above the street in a neighbourhood of residential properties.

Date of construction: 1866

Architect: Unknown

Builders: John Craigie and Jonathan Stevenson

Owners and occupants: J. David and Barbara Lillico and James Warren and Joyce Evelyn Solomon

Significance:

This house might be considered the culmination of the Gothic style of architecture as it developed in Peterborough. With its high center gable, its wealth of well-preserved "gingerbread" trim, and its Italianate window detailing, it is architecturally the most exciting dwelling house in Peterborough. Henry Calcutt, the long-time owner, was best known in mid nineteenth-century Peterborough as a brewer and the owner of a fleet of river steamboats.

Historical background:

On August 9, 1866, Reverend Mark Burnham sold lot #133 south of Robinson Street and west of Mark Street in the village of Ashburnham to John Craigie and Jonathon Stevenson. (Instrument #19167) Reverend Burnham had received the land in the late 1840s from his father, the Honourable Zaccheus Burnham Sr., who had received it as a Crown Patent around 1820. As sawyers and wood craftsmen, Craigie and Stevenson would build the Gothic structure now known as 73 Robinson Street, which would become the home of the Calcutt family. The house was probably architecturally designed, but it has not been possible to discover the name of the architect. On November 11, 1869, Craigie and Stevenson sold the house, lot, and adjoining southern lot to Isabella B. Calcutt, wife of Henry Calcutt, for $2400 (158). The Calcutt family would own the house until 1943. Born in Cobourg in 1837, Henry Calcutt's direct lineage may be traced back to the days of British heraldry. His great great great-grandfather, James Calcutt, went to Ireland with Oliver Cromwell In 1749 as an officer in his bodyguard, the famous "Ironsides". The next generation of Calcutts were born at Sharane Castle, Boyle in Upper Woods, as grandchildren of the local squire. The succeeding generation was born in County Tipperary. Henry's parents, James Calcutt and the former Jane Shannon, came to Canada in 1832, landing in Cobourg on July 31. There James operated a farm and distillery and had eleven children from two marriages. Henry was the first son born in Canada. In 1855 Henry left his family in Cobourg and moved to Peterborough, where he established Calcutt's Brewing and Malting Company. The brewery was destroyed by fire in 1863 and was replaced by a stone brewery built on the west side of Lake Street (now Burnham Street) just north of the park. Calcutt also started a line of steamers plying Rice Lake and the Otonabee River between Peterborough and Harwood, connecting with the Midland, Ontario, Cobourg, and Quebec railways. He also built and carried on a flax mill in Ashburnham and tried to encourage the growth of flax as a crop in this area. Unfortunately, the mill was destroyed by fire after only four years of operation. He also owned the Galway Mining Company. as well as the popular summer resort "Idlewood" outside Ashburnham.

Mr. Calcutt was a village Councillor for many years, reeve for three years, and Ashburnham's representative on the County Council. Before moving to Peterborough Henry had married Isabella Green of Port Hope, by whom he had six daughters and one son. Clara Mina Calcutt later married Richard B. Rogers of Ashburnham. Adeline B. Calcutt died unmarried March 27, 1905. May K. Calcutt became Mrs. Logan of Ashburnham and died November 12, 1886. Isabella Kate Calcutt and Margaret Julia Calcutt both died unmarried shortly after World War II and before 1950. Annie Calcutt died unmarried before 1905. Clare Foster Calcutt, Henry Calcutt's only son, worked in his father's brewery and was a steamship captain before his death on May 24, 1907. He never married.

Mrs. Calcutt died March 2, 1881, leaving the house on Robinson Street to her husband. He lived his last years as a retired gentleman, his business having been merged into a joint stock company. A stroke suffered around 1910 left him partially paralyzed and confined to a wheelchair. He died June 16, 1913, and was interred next to his wife in Little Lake Cemetery. Henry Calcutt willed the house to his daughters Clara, Margaret, and Isabella, and to his grandson Henry Logan. (Will #1956, General Registry, Peterborough) In 1914 Clara conveyed her interests to the other three, who became sole property owners. Margaret, Isabella, and their aunt Susan Calcutt lived in the house for many years. During the early 1930s family friend Harriet Levina Dougherty moved into the house, and in 1934 Miss Dougherty's sister and brotherin-law Helen and James Field moved in as well. The Fields moved out in 1950, but Miss Dougherty remained as housekeeper and nurse to the aging Calcutts. Susan Calcutt had died in 1940, and on November 25, 1947, the two sisters conveyed the house in fee simple to Miss Dougherty. (#58137) When the two sisters died shortly before 1950, Hattie Dougherty continued to live in the house with her niece. In early 1982 Miss Dougherty moved to a nursing home, where she died on September 28, 1982. On November 10, 1982, the house was sold to Lawrence and Alice Wiles (#391000), who began much needed repairs and restoration. In 1989 the house was sold to J. David and Barbara Lillico, the present owners. Over the years few changes or additions have been made to the house. On February 12, 1870, Mrs. Calcutt purchased part of the easterly adjoining lots where a red-brick coach house was erected that summer. A kitchen wing perpendicular to the house was probably added to the south facade at the same time. There have been no changes in the main features, and only one of the original cast-iron balconies has been removed. Historical background prepared by Gina Basciano in April 1983 from many sources, including the Public Archives of Canada; the Peterborough Land Registry Office; the assessment rolls, collector's rolls, and directories of Ashburnham; Mulvaney's History of Peterborough County; Poole's The Early Settlement of Peterborough County; and the Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough County: 1825-1875

Architectural description of building for designation by-law:

Exterior

This impressive house in the Gothic style is set well back from the south side of Robinson Street. Its hillside site results in its being elevated above the street level, especially at its western end. The main body of the house is rectangular with the long north facade facing the street, and it contains one and one-half stories under a high and steep gabled roof. At the rear there is a lower one-and-one-half-story gabled kitchen wing with a one-story addition to the east. This wing is connected by a closed breezeway to a rectangular one-story outbuilding. The foundation is of random granite rubble. The house is constructed of solid red brick laid in stretcher bond on the front and west facades and in common bond elsewhere. The header courses vary from every other to every eighth course. The house rests on a plinth of four courses of white brick, and there is quoining in white brick on all corners of the main house. The walls are finished at the top with three courses of white brick under the soffits. The top three courses on all the walls of the main house are white brick. On the gables, including the front center gable, these courses are laid parallel to the slope of the roof. Plinth, quoining, and top courses project about one inch from the wall surface on the west and north (or front) facades. Elsewhere they are flush with the wall. Except for the chimneys, most of the brick has been painted red or cream. A simple molding is attached to the inner edge of the plain soffits, which are decorated with delicate bargeboards cut out in a pattern of scrolls. Each gable is topped with a finial.

Two chimneys, offset from either end, rise through the ridge of the main roof. The western one is false and rests on a platform in the attic. Each consists of two square stacks resting on a base of white brick. They are of red brick for about two-thirds of their height, at which they are joined by a single course of white brick and then continue in white brick and are joined again at the top by two courses of white brick. A porch extends across the north and east facades. On the east its roof is supported by chamfered square columns. Each of its four bays has cutout brackets at the corners and hanging cut-out swag-like decorations at the center. The north or front porch is quite different in design. It rests on a latticed basement which is quite high at its western end and is approached by a central flight of wooden steps. There are three large and equal bays across the front of the house and a narrower one at the end of the east side porch. Its roof is supported by columns in treillage and an elaborate cut-out frieze. Depressed wooden arches with cut-out decoration in their spandrels crown each bay, and there are central cut-out swag-like decorations under each arch. An open 'railing along the front and on either side of the steps consists of slender square members in a pattern of crossed diagonals, rectangles, and verticals. The porch ceiling is made up of large panels of tongued and grooved boards in frames of molding.

Main or north façade:

The first floor of the main facade, under the porch, contains three bays. A single-leaved door with three round-topped lights occupies the central bay behind a semi-hexagonal wooden storm porch with transoms and large windows with narrow glazing bars above two rows of rectangular panels. The details of the panels and the delicacy of the glazing bars suggest that while this storm porch may not be original, it is very old. The bays on either side contain identical three-sided wooden bays extending from the porch floor to its ceiling. Each side consists of a single plain wall above a baseboard and is framed by molding. The front of each bay contains a round-topped window with double-hung sash and the narrow glazing bars, found in all the windows. The upper sash contains a round-topped central pane surrounded by two rectangular panes and three curved ones. The lower sash contains a single central pane with vertical pairs of rectangular panes on either side. There is no window surround, but there is a wooden lug sill. Below the window is a single rectangular panel framed with raised molding. The sides of the bays are similar, but the four-aver-four round-topped windows are narrower, and the top panes of the upper sash have pointed tops. On the second-story level there is a steep central gable containing a pair of round-topped French doors each of which contains above a low bottom panel three pairs of narrow panes, the top pair having pointed tops. The doors lead onto a small three-sided balcony resting on the porch roof which is surrounded by a cast-iron railing. The windows are surrounded by a simple molding and set into a slightly recessed wall panel surmounted by a single basket or three-centered relieving arch of white brick.

West façade:

The two main stories of this facade each contain two bays. On the first floor the northern bay contains a projecting three-sided bay window in red brick. The window in the center of the bay has a semi-circular top, moulded trim, a wooden lug sill, and is surmounted by a semi-circular arch of radiating voussoirs of white brick. The arrangement of panes is identical to that of the windows in the center of the front bays. The side windows are slightly lower and narrow, also with moulded trim and wooden lug sills. They have white brick segmental heads of radiating voussoirs. The pane arrangement is identical with the side windows of the front bays.

The southern bay of this facade contains a window like the central window of the adjoining bay. On the second story the northern bay contains a pair of French doors like those in the front gable, under a three-centered relieving arch of white brick. These doors originallyy led onto a balcony over the firststory bay window which was surrounded by a cast-iron railing. This balcony has now been enclosed by a wooden porch with two narrow roundtopped windows on each side. The southern bay on this story contains a pair of narrow windows with semicircular tops and a pane arrangement like that of the side windows on the bays of the front facade. They are slightly recessed under a white brick relieving arch.

An attic window in the gable is of the casement type with six panes, the top two pointed. It is surrounded by simple molding, has a wooden luq sill and a semi-circular head of radiating white brick voussoirs.

East faced:

This facade is very like the western-one. On the first story, however, there is no bay window, but rather two windows identical to the southern one on the west facade. On the second story there are two pairs of windows like that in the southern bay on the west. The attic window in the gable is identical to that on the west.

South façade:

The kitchen wing is offset slightly to the east, and west of it on the main block there is on the first story a small porch with a bell-cast roof and treillage trim like that of the front porch. Under the porch there is a double-leaved door, with each leaf containing a narrow roundtopped window of two panes and a rectangular lower panel with molding.

Kitchen wing:

The kitchen wing is constructed of red brick laid in stretcher bond. The roof is gabled and lower than that of the main house. It has a plain soffit and fascia. A chimney rises at the gable end. On the second story there are two windows with simple moulded trim, wooden lug sills, flat heads of radiating red brick voussoirs, and six-over-six double-hung sash. On the west side of the kitchen on the first story there are two similar but larger windows and a small rectangular window under the eaves. To the east of the kitchen wing a one-bay addition with a shed roof was added. It is constructed of red brick laid in common bond with white brick quoining flush with the wall. On its east and south sides there are single windows with flat heads of radiating voussoirs, moulded trim, lug sills, and six-over-six double-hung sash.

Interior front hall:

The relatively narrow central hall extends more than halfway into the house. On the left there is a straight flight of stairs of pine which is undecorated. The turned newel, slender turned balusters, and rail are cherry. Just inside the front door a door opens to the left into a parlour and to the right a double-leaved door opens into the living room. The top two-thirds of each leaf is occupied by a glass pane, while 1n the lower third there 1s a rectangular panel. The deep baseboards with molding and the moulded door surrounds are of pine. There is a coved cornice with plaster mouldings.

Living room:

The living room and connecting dining room occupy the west end of the house, the living room taking up more than half the depth of the house. The rooms are separated by a depressed archway nearly as high and broad as the rooms set into a wall of rectangular wood panels which also cover the deep inside of the archway. The room is rectangular. On the front or north wall there is an alcove containing a three-sided bay window separated from the room by a depressed arch nearly at ceiling height. The arch is decorated with ornate plaster molding and rests on elaborate plaster impost brackets. On the west side of the room there is a larger bay window alcove separated from the room by a triple arch consisting of a larger central depressed arch with smaller semicircular arches on either side. These are decorated with elaborate plaster molding and rest on either side on impost brackets like those in the north bay. On either side of the central arch there are plaster pendants matching the design of the brackets. The insides of the arches are decorated with panels of plaster molding.

The main walls of the room are crowned with a very elaborate and complex cornice molding whose dominating feature is a wide band of openwork plaster in a design of entwined garlands. DINING ROOM The dining room has a heavy and complex plaster cornice molding, but it is far less elaborate than that in the living room. The room is lit by a western window and by the two round-topped lights of the double-leaved door leading to the small south porch. A double-leaved door with glass lights like that leading from the hall to the living room connects the room on the east to the service areas. In both living and dining rooms the baseboards are high and topped w1th mouldings. The window and door surrounds are plain with mouldings around the edges There are plaster medallions in the center of the ceilings of both rooms. There is a continuous floor of wide pine boards in the two rooms.

Carriage House:

The carriage house is situated to the southeast of the main house. It is a rectangular building with an east-west axis constructed of solid red brick, laid in stretcher bond. The gabled roof has plain soffits and fascias. There is a central gable on the front or north side which contains a small rectangular window and is hung with diamond-shaped red tiles. There are two carriage doors on the main facade. The one to the east is set farther from the end of the building than the western one. The western doorway is headed by a segmental arch of radiating voussoirs and contains a two-leaved door, each leaf of which contains a larger upper and small lower panel of diagonal tongued-and-grooved boards. The eastern door is headed by a flat arch of brick voussoirs and contains a wooden sliding door. On the eastern end there are three square singlepane windows. The openings are headed by double segmental arches of radiating voussoirs. On the western end there is a door to the loft headed by a segmental arch of radiating voussoirs.

537-539 Waterford St

Location:

This Regency-style cottage is located on the west side of Waterford Street in one of the oldest neighbourhoods in Peterborough. Legal Description; THOSE lands and premises located in the following municipality, namely, in the City of Peterborough, and the Province of Ontario, and being composed of that part of lot 4 north of McDonnel Street and east of Water Street designated as Part 1 on Reference Plan 45R3340. SUBJECT TO the rights of the owners of the adjoining lands to the south of said parcel to maintain the eaves of the present building erected on the property over the most southerly twelve inches(12") in the width of the most westerly one hundred and two feet (102') in depth of the said parcel of land also subject to the rights of the owners of the adjoining land to the west of the said parcel to maintain the eaves of the present building erected on their property over the most westerly twelve inches (12") in depth of the said parcel of land.

Original Owner:

John Haffey Tailor Owner in 1988: Carol D.M.Dauncey Date of Construction: possibly 1869, see Note* Builder: possibly Henry Myers Site & Setting: The John Haffey Cottage sits on a narrow lot approximately 44 ft x 114 ft., only 10 feet away from the street line. The front door is flanked by two tall spruce trees and the house is surrounded by shrubs and flowers. The back garden is wooded and directly behind the cottage grows a mature soft maple tree. Very near and to the south of the cottage is a 1 1/2 storey frame house built in the 1880s. To the north is a 2 storey brick house built after 1914. On the lot to the west of this lot is the Henry Myers Cottage. Significance This Regency Style cottage is an example of a working-man’s modest dwelling in the 19th century. Its position is important in the streetscape of Waterford Street as the buildings in this neighbourhood have not significantly changed since the late 19th century.

Historical Background:

Attached to a document (see Deposit Index #1960) that can be found in the Registry Office, there is an unregistered mortgage between John Haffey and William Lasher. This mortgage tells of another agreement made on the same day between John Haffey and Henry Myers to build a dwelling on this lot for the sum of $250. It is probable that Henry Myers did build this cottage in 1869 for John and Letitia Haffey, who lived in it until John's death in 1875. John Haffey willed his property, which included this lot and house, to his grandson, Edward J. Carew, but it was Edward’s mother, John Haffey’s daughter Margaret, a widow remarried to Patrick O'Mara, who lived in it until her death in Feb. 1919. At that time, Margaret's daughter, Emily Theresa Carew, continued to reside in her family's home until she sold it 1944. There remains a mystery about this property. Early assessment rolls and city directories list two municipal addresses for this lot. In her statement of 1941, Emily Carew talks of the "houses" on this property. Number 537 is still in existence but at sometime number 539 was built and later, presumably, demolished. Unfortunately, no official document exists that can accurately place number 539 on this lot.

Architectural Description: This Regency-style cottage is a 1 storey, detached, single-family dwelling. Although painted several times, it appears to retain the original rough-cast finish. An enclosed rear porch and barn-board shed are attached, side by side, to the rear of the house; they have a metal roof. The total width of the porch and shed do not exceed that of the house. The height of the shed/porch are the same, being approximately the height of the eaves of the house. Beneath the house in the partially excavated cellar, are hand hewn wooden sills upon which the house sits. This would suggest post and beam construction. originallyy, It is said that the house was divided into four rooms by partitions extending to the roof, with a brick chimney running up the center of the house. In recent times, ceilings were added and the center chimney removed, although in the attic the chimney survives. The roof is framed with 2 x 6 inch rafters and the roof boards are of varying widths of up to 18 inches. Much of the roof is charred - at some time there must have been a fire in the building. The low hip roof is now covered with asphalt shingles but was probably originallyy covered in wood shingles. It is finished with plain wooden Soffits and facia. The Main entrance is centrally located on the front, or east, façade. The door structure has a flat opening with moulded wood trim. Above it is a flat two light transom of plain glass. The wooden outer door has been recycled from another building and the inner door is modern. The doorway is protected by a small roof of recent construction, In the 1875 Birdseye View of Peterborough, this house appears to have a verandah across the entire front of the building. On either side of the door is a large rectangular two sash window with four lights. They are surrounded by moulded wood trim and appear to be quite old.

North façade:

On the north, exterior wall is a chimney, recently built of reclaimed brick in a 19th century manner. This wall has only one rectangular window close to the back of the building. This window has the same trim as the east windows and, appears to be quite old, but when the kitchen was modernized, the lower sash was covered with wooden louvers to conceal the sink in the interior. The remaining upper sash contains four lights.

South façade:

It has two windows close to the back of the house. The small modern window was installed when the bathroom was added and is very close to a large rectangular, original window. This large window is surrounded by moulded wood trim, has 12 over 12 lights, and is probably the oldest window in the house.

West façade:

This facade contains the porch and shed. The porch is a later addition to the house and its styling 1ndicates that it might have been added to the house in the 1880s. The porch has an off-centered wooden door. The porch is made or glass and wood panels, and running the entire upper width of the porch are pink, peach and blue stained, rippled glass transom lights. Another entrance to the porch is on the north facade. Its wooden door is made of two panels of frosted glass over two wooden panels and has etched-glass side lights of an urn-and-flower pattern.

*Note: There are at least four reasons to speculate that the house at 537 Water ford street might have been built prior to 1865: The deposit index held in the registry office was not registered and unfortunately does not describe this building; The post and beam construction technique used in the is building lost its popularity after the 1850's; The 12-over-12 window is a much earlier window style; The 1854 assessment roll shows George Dunford as a householder at N. McDonnel E. Water Pt. 3 & 4. We can speculate that this building might have been built prior to 1865, or perhaps that an earlier structure was improved upon since the roof was framed.

671 George St N

Legal description:

The lands and buildings, known municipally as 671 George Street North, lie in the City of Peterborough, in the Country of Peterborough and Province of Ontario and being composed of part of Lot Number One South of Antrim Street and West of George Street, in the said City of Peterborough more particularly described as follows:

COMMENCING at a point in the easterly limit of said lot distant southerly 70 feet 9 inches from the northeast angle of said lot said point of commencement being the southeast angle of the lands heretofore sold and conveyed by John Rothwell to one Robert Ross by registered instrument No. 11266;

THENCE westerly and parallel with Antrim Street along the said southern limit of said lands hereinbefore conveyed to Ross a distance of 70 feet; THENCE southerly parallel with the eastern limit of said lot 36 feet 6 inches to the southern limit of the lands heretofore granted and conveyed to one Richard Parnell by registered instrument No. 6718;

THENCE easterly along said southern limit and parallel with the northern limit of said lot to the easterly limit thereof;

THENCE northerly along said easterly limit 36 feet 6 inches more or less to the place of beginning. as in instrument number 422272

Original owner:: Henry Lawson

Owner:IN 1991: Mr. Edward Smith of 66A Bond Street, Lindsay, Ontario

Date construction commenced: Unknown, but at least by 1865

Builder: attributed to Henry Lawson

Site and setting:

The house is situated on the west side of George street in an area of residential buildings on narrow lots dating from the mid-nineteenth century to the early twentieth century. It is the northernmost of three more-or-Iess contemporary houses erected by Henry Lawson.

Significance:

This house is a good example of the front-gable one-and-one-half-story house typical of artisans' housing in mid-nineteenth-century Ontario. It is one of three contemporary houses built together on George Street and other similar houses exist in the immediate area. Thus it helps to maintain the character of the neighbourhood, in which it is one of the oldest structures and which contains houses representing the various periods of the city's growth through the 1920s.

Historical background:

Little is known about the history of this house, which was probably built by Henry Lawson as a rental property. Lawson, the first recorded owner, built several houses in the city. He retained ownership of this house until 1875.

Exterior description of building for designation by-law:

This gable-fronted one-and-one-half-story house is rectangular in shape, and its narrow east facade faces George Street. Across the rear or west facade there is a one-story extension with a shed roof, the rear wall of which is covered with cove siding. The house is constructed of thin stacked planks and rests on a low foundation of granite rubble.

There are indications that it was originallyy covered with roughcast plaster, but this, as well as all cornice mouldings, eaves returns, and other architectural details have been removed, presumably when the house was covered with metal siding. The gently sloped gable roof is provided with very thin fascias and soffits. On the north side there is a gabled dormer with two rectangular windows which is probably not original. A central chimney, perhaps in its original position, is located about one third of the way back from the east facade.

Two other exterior chimneys, on the south and west facades, are clearly not original. All the windows are rectangular, with wooden sills. Those on the second floor are shorter than those on the first. There are three on the first floor of the south facade, one being in the end of the extension, and three in the main body of the house on the north, with another smaller one in the north end of the extension. On the second floor of the west facade there are two windows, quite close together and near the roof. On the main facade there are two symmetrically but widely spaced windows on the second floor and one on the first floor to the right.

All these windows were presumably originallyy fitted with six-over-six double-hung sash with very thin muntins. There original sash exist on the north, west, and east facades, but have been replaced on the-south. The main door is placed to the left on the front facade and consists of a door containing two vertical panels surrounded by a transom with six square lights and side lights of three panes each above vertical panels. The door surround and interior members are wooden with beading at the edges.

The lands and buildings, known municipally as 671 George Street North, lie in the City of Peterborough, in the Country of Peterborough and Province of Ontario and being composed of part of Lot Number One South of Antrim Street and West of George Street, in the said City of Peterborough more particularly described as follows:

COMMENCING at a point in the easterly limit of said lot distant southerly 70 feet 9 inches from the northeast angle of said lot said point of commencement being the southeast angle of the lands heretofore sold and conveyed by John Rothwell to one Robert Ross by registered instrument No. 11266;

THENCE westerly and parallel with Antrim Street along the said southern limit of said lands hereinbefore conveyed to Ross a distance of 70 feet; THENCE southerly parallel with the eastern limit of said lot 36 feet 6 inches to the southern limit of the lands heretofore granted and conveyed to one Richard Parnell by registered instrument No. 6718;

THENCE easterly along said southern limit and parallel with the northern limit of said lot to the easterly limit thereof;

THENCE northerly along said easterly limit 36 feet 6 inches more or less to the place of beginning. as in instrument number 422272

Original owner:: Henry Lawson

Owner:IN 1991: Mr. Edward Smith of 66A Bond Street, Lindsay, Ontario

Date construction commenced: Unknown, but at least by 1865

Builder: attributed to Henry Lawson

Site and setting:

The house is situated on the west side of George street in an area of residential buildings on narrow lots dating from the mid-nineteenth century to the early twentieth century. It is the northernmost of three more-or-Iess contemporary houses erected by Henry Lawson.

Significance:

This house is a good example of the front-gable one-and-one-half-story house typical of artisans' housing in mid-nineteenth-century Ontario. It is one of three contemporary houses built together on George Street and other similar houses exist in the immediate area. Thus it helps to maintain the character of the neighbourhood, in which it is one of the oldest structures and which contains houses representing the various periods of the city's growth through the 1920s.

Historical background:

Little is known about the history of this house, which was probably built by Henry Lawson as a rental property. Lawson, the first recorded owner, built several houses in the city. He retained ownership of this house until 1875.

Exterior description of building for designation by-law:

This gable-fronted one-and-one-half-story house is rectangular in shape, and its narrow east facade faces George Street. Across the rear or west facade there is a one-story extension with a shed roof, the rear wall of which is covered with cove siding. The house is constructed of thin stacked planks and rests on a low foundation of granite rubble.

There are indications that it was originallyy covered with roughcast plaster, but this, as well as all cornice mouldings, eaves returns, and other architectural details have been removed, presumably when the house was covered with metal siding. The gently sloped gable roof is provided with very thin fascias and soffits. On the north side there is a gabled dormer with two rectangular windows which is probably not original. A central chimney, perhaps in its original position, is located about one third of the way back from the east facade.

Two other exterior chimneys, on the south and west facades, are clearly not original. All the windows are rectangular, with wooden sills. Those on the second floor are shorter than those on the first. There are three on the first floor of the south facade, one being in the end of the extension, and three in the main body of the house on the north, with another smaller one in the north end of the extension. On the second floor of the west facade there are two windows, quite close together and near the roof. On the main facade there are two symmetrically but widely spaced windows on the second floor and one on the first floor to the right.

All these windows were presumably originallyy fitted with six-over-six double-hung sash with very thin muntins. There original sash exist on the north, west, and east facades, but have been replaced on the-south. The main door is placed to the left on the front facade and consists of a door containing two vertical panels surrounded by a transom with six square lights and side lights of three panes each above vertical panels. The door surround and interior members are wooden with beading at the edges.

442-448 George St N

Legal description and location:

The building is known municipally as 442-444- 446-448 George Street North or "The Morrow Building". That portion of the certain parcel or tract of land and premise situate, lying and being in the City of Peterborough, in the County of Peterborough and Province of Ontario and being composed of the west fifty feet of the south eighty feet of Lot One, North of Brock Street and East of George Street in City Plan number Twenty-three for the said City of Peterborough. Excepted there-out is that portion along the easterly limit of the said parcel upon which the westerly walls of the building belonging to Daniel Dowdell and William Ryder (The Pig's Ear Tavern) are situate and that portion along the northerly limit of the said parcel upon which the southerly walls of the building belonging to the Federal Business Development Bank (King Arthur Steak House and Tavern) are situate.

Architect: John E. Belcher

Date of construction: 1879

Original builders: Carlisle and Rutherford

Owner: Henry Chan

Site and setting:

The Morrow Building is situated in the central part of the city on the northeast corner of Brock and George streets. The building is bound by the King Arthur Steak House and Tavern to the north, the Pig's Ear Tavern to the east, George Street to the west and Brock Street to the south. SIGNIFICANCE - The Morrow Building was financed by Robert A. Morrow, the second last member of a family devoted to Peterborough development since the early 1840's. It was originallyy designed as the local Post Office by John E. Belcher, one of Peterborough's most prominent architects and former city engineers who was responsible for the design of many local commercial and public buildings. Remarkable for its architectural expertise and beauty, the Morrow Building remains the last local commercial building built in the French Classic or Second Empire style.

Historical background:

The Morrow Building stands on the piece of land at the northeast corner of Brock and George Streets originallyy deeded to John Benson in 1835 and sold by sheriff's deed to Robert Chambers in 1824 who; in turn, sold to George Barker Hall the whole half acre for three hundred pounds. In the next year and a half, George Barker Hall sold portions to William Hall, Oughtry Morrow and Charles Hudson. Both William Hall and Charles Hudson later sold their portions while Oughtry Morrow, upon his death in 1848, willed his property to his young son Robert Archibald Morrow. It was Robert A. Morrow who would eventually build the structure known as the Morrow Building. Local development involved the Morrow family as early as 1840. Oughtry Morrow, for many years one of Peterborough's most respected storekeepers and merchants, was a land speculator, who owned various tracts of land in the town district. Upon his death in 1848, he willed his lands to his son Robert A. Morrow, who then bought and developed several other local areas including Thirty acre section in the southern part of Peterborough,(then North Monaghan Township) eventually known as Morrow Park. Deeply interested in Peterborough's agricultural development, Robert A. Morrow often gave financial assistance to the local Agricultural Society. It was Mr. Morrow who, in 1884, began leasing part of his acreage in North Monaghan Township to the Agricultural Society for use as an agricultural park. Robert A. Morrow's son, Harold, continued the Morrow family tradition by becoming one of Peterborough's most noted benefactors. It was he who eventually donated Morrow Park to the city and dedicated it to the honour and memory of his late father. The Morrow family home, acquired by Robert A. Morrow in 1875 and for seventy-seven years the home of Harold Morrow, was an impressive stone structure in North Monaghan Township just west of the town.

After a number of annexations, the Morrow home, originallyy known as ‘Clonsilla’, is today located on Sherbrooke Street within the confines of the city of Peterborough. Plans for the Morrow Building began in 1875. In that year, Robert A. Morrow asked local architect John E. Belcher to design an ornate building to be erected for commercial use on his long owned lot at the northeast corner of Brock and George Streets. The building already existing there, which contained John Fletcher's shoemaking business would apparently be demolished. It was fitting that Morrow should ask Mr. Belcher to design the building since it was he who was responsible for a number of the public buildings in Peterborough. Today some of Mr. Belcher's credits include the Market Hall and Clock Tower, the Kawartha-Haliburton Children's Aid Society and Peterborough Collegiate and Vocational School. It is difficult to say whether Mr. Morrow originallyy intended the building to be a post office. Since there was a five-year lapse between the planning and the actual building of the structure, it is highly possible that Mr. Morrow, in 1875, intended the building for an as yet unspecified commercial use.

At any rate, he must have received assurance sometime during that five years that the federal department would lease part of his newly proposed building for the ten thousand dollar investment opened in 1880 with the Peterborough Post Office occupying the ground floor. Lieutenant - Colonel H.C. Rogers, an officer from a celebrated United Empire Loyalist family who commanded a troop of the Prince of Wales' Royal Canadian Dragoon Guard, was the presiding post-master. The upper floors belonged to the Peterborough Club, a social club originating a few years' earlier. Over the years, the Morrow Building has seen many tenants. When the post office moved to a new location in 1888, the bottom floor became the premises of J.J. Hall - Inland Revenue (446 George Street) and J.J. Aylmer - Engineer - Trent Canal Office (448 George Street). Upon relocation in the mid 1880's of the Peterborough Club, the Young Men's Christian Association office and the Trent Canal Office took up the second floor. When Harold Morrow received ownership of the building from his father in 1912, a great deal of leasing followed. By 1925, J.W. Watson, "Peterborough's Largest Retail Tire Dealer" occupied 446 George Street while George Matthews packing company occupied 442 George Street. The second floor housed the Assembly Gospel Hall. In 19JO~ the bottom floor contained William Petrie's Shoe Repair and Morrow and Beatty Limited - engineering contractors. In 1945, Harold Morrow sold the Morrow building to Jane J. and Agnes Horsefield who occupied the millinery shop at 444 George Street. Since then, many other businesses and organizations have been on the premises.

The present owner of the Morrow Building, Henry Chan, obtained ownership in 1977, and has the first floor leased currently to Jim's Pizzaria, Hall and Gillespie Law Office and the hairstyling salon known as The Cut Above. The second floor contains Mr. Chan's flea market business and the third floor has been vacant for a number of years. Architecturally, the Morrow Building was and still remains a gem. It is the only commercial example of the French Classic or Second Empire style left in Peterborough. Upon its completion in 1880, the Peterborough Examiner proclaimed it as "an ornament to the town", while architect John E. Belcher proudly described his newest work: “It is in the French classic style with arcaded ground story from whence spring pilasters supporting a panelled frieze and medallioned cornice, with balustrade and pedimented windows.

The Mansard roof has neatly designed cast-iron crestings. Above the facade on George St. is a central tower." Each floor had its own separate features, all fitting together to form a single magnificent unit. The first floor had large brick arched openings with stone voussoirs. Between each arch was a decorative circular grill and a decorative brick stringer course topped the pilasters supporting the brick arches. Within these arches were casement windows with semicircular transom lights above. The doors were four-panelled with the mouldings on the upper panel forming a rectangle whose top corners were rounded. The corner door at George and Brock Streets was a curved double door and a simple cornice completed the first floor. The second storey had long, rectangular double-hung windows with ornate stone cornices on decorative supports. A semi-circular cap sat on top of each cornice.

The exception to these windows was the central Palladian or Serliana window below the tower. This arched window was flanked by two narrow rectangular windows. Above this window were numerous brackets supporting the entablature at the top of this storey. These brackets were repeated above each brick pilaster and brick dentils appeared under the entablature. At the corner sat a curved window adorned with a decorative wrought iron balcony. The third floor had a mansard roof punctured with windows within semi-circular dormers. A heavy balustrade continued between the pilasters supporting each dormer. Finials sat on this balustrade and flanked the window below the tower. The central window had three double hung windows, which sat under a semicircular dormer. The face of the dormer had a large fan cap and finial above. A dentilled entablature completed the mansard. On the roof, elaborate chimneys were capped with forms, which echoed the dormers and a decorative iron cresting surrounded the mansard.

Exterior description of building for designation by-law

The Morrow building is French Classic or Second Empire Style with a symmetric front facade about the remains of a central tower. The first floor has large brick arched openings with stone voussoirs. Between each arch is a small decorative circular grill and topping the pilasters supporting the arches is a brick stringer course. A covered entrance at the southwest corner of the building shelters the door to 442 George Street. The first storey also contains a cornice. The second storey contains long, rectangular, double hung windows with a curved window at the southwest corner. Ornate stone cornices on decorative supports top these windows. The central Palladian or Serliana window below the tower has a narrow rectangular window on each side. The brackets above this window support the entablature and are identical to the ones above each brick pilaster. Numerous brick dentils appear under the entablature. The mansard roof has windows with semi-circular dormers. The central window has three double hung windows under a larger, semi-circular dormer. A dentilled entablature completes the mansard and plain chimneys sit on top.

704 George St N

Legal description:

704 George Street North, being part Lot 1, South of Parkhill Road and East of George Street, City and County of Peterborough.

Site and setting:

The house is set on the eas t side of George Street, in a neighbourhood of small nineteenth-century residential buildings.

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION - ca 1855

ARCHITECT - Unknown.

BUILDER - William Lee

The design for the house was probably taken from a pattern book.

Significance:

This is perhaps the best preserved small Gothic house in Peterborough. It stil l retains nearly all its external architectural features. It was built as his own residence by one the most active builders in the midnineteenth- century city.

Historical background:

William Lee was the builder and first occupant of the house at 704 George Street. There is some question as to whether or not he was related to the Lees who were among the first settlers of Smith Towns hip in 1818. According to family records retained by his great-granddaughter, he was born in 1834_in County Monaghan, Ireland, and emigrated to Canada with his family in 1847. Except for three years in the 1890's when he took a homestead in the Northwest Territories, he lived the rest of his life in Peterborough, dying there in March 1908. He was a builder, carpenter, and millwright employed by the Dixon Lumber Company. In addition he and his brothers John and Thomas were active builders of houses in the city. They are said also to have built several churches in the Cavan area with the help of volunteer labour.

In 1854 William purchased the presumably vacant half-acre lot at the southeast corner of the intersection of George Street and Smith Street (now Parkhill Road), or his father purchased it in his name. At about the same time his brother John obtained title to the lot on the southwest corner, upon which he or William built the only octagonal house in the city, and perhaps the only one in the province to be built of stacked planks. That house has unfortunately been destroyed. The intersection became known as Lee's Corner.

On the southern half of his lot William built in 1855 the one-and- onehalf- story cross-gabled Gothic house which still stands at 704. He seems to have lived there with his parents until his marriage in 1872. By 1870 he had erected on the northern part of the lot the much more imposing brick house now numbered 710, which he rented for a few years and then moved into himself with his bride. In 1916 Mrs. Lee gave 704 to her daughter and son-in-law, Lillian and Edward Manning, but they lived at 710 with Mrs. Lee and rented 704. After Mrs. Lee's death in 1919, both houses were eventually sold, and the Mannings moved to 650 George Street.

William Lee's obituary in the Peterborough Examiner on March 26, 1908, noted that he was one of the oldest, most widely-known, and highly-esteemed citizens of Peterborough, notable for his enduring principles, exactness, and honesty. He was a prominent member of the congregation of St. Paul's Presbyterian church and took an active part in municipal affairs, being returning officer for Ward 4 for 35 years. A staunch Liberal in politics, he was a great admirer of George Brown.

Architectural description of building for designation by-law:

This one-and-one-half story cross-gabled house in the Gothic style is situated on the east side of George Street. The main body of the house is Lshaped, with the long leg running east and west, the west gable end facing the street. The short leg, running north and south, is gabled at either end. A slightly lower one-and-one-half story kitchen wing extends eastward from the center of the rear wall. This wing has been extended to the north by a onestory addition with a shed roof, so that the northern wall is now unbroken on the first floor.

There are two central chimneys. One is slightly west of the angle of the main house. The other rises from the kitchen wing close to where it joins the main house. The rear chimney has a pattern of vertical rectangular lozenges around the top.

The medium-gabled roof has projecting eaves with plain slanting soffits finished with a simple round molding at the inside and elaborately cut-out fascias on the main body of the house, with the exception of the east side of the L. The north, west, and south gables have projecting verges and are finished with finials and bargeboards matching the fascias. The kitchen wing and the east side of the L have simple slanted soffits and plain fascias. The gable of the kitchen wing is also plain.

The house appears to be of frame construction, above a foundation of granite rubble, though the foundation has been covered with plaster and does not show on the exterior. The house was originallyy sheathed in lath and plaster. Thick furring strips and a second lath and roughcast plaster sheathing was added over the original many years ago.

Because the new wall surface has been brought well beyond the original window and door trim, all windows and doors have been boxed in with frames to bring them out to the new wall surface, and window sills have been extended.

The original trim is flat with a bead on the inner edge and cove molding on the outer edge. There are plain wooden slip sills.

A verandah close to ground level extends across the front (west) façade and along the south to the projecting L. Its curved or awning roof is  supported by four treillage columns on the front and three on the south. The top of each is filled with a square containing a cut-out quatre-foil. Four similar treillage columns form a screen at the north end of the front porch.

An unusual feature is that the ceiling of the porch has also been lathed and plastered, following the curve of the rafters.

There is a narrower and higher porch with a simple hipped roof along the south side of the kitchen wing, supported on chamfered posts with simple open brackets. The post against the east wall of the L is partially embedded in the second plaster layer.

West façade:

This is the main or street facade and consists of two bays on each story. The northern bay of the first floor is the main doorway. The door is surrounded by a flat transom of four lights and side lights, each of four panes with a single rectangular panel at the bottom. The original door has been replaced with a multiple-paned glass door. The transom is separated from the lower portions of the doorway by a horizontal moulded lintel.

The right bay contains a double-leaved French door. Each leaf contains eight panes over a rectangular panel. The window retains its original full louvered shutters with rectangular panels at the bottoms .

There are two windows on the second floor, centered in the gable. The original six-over six sashes have been replaced with two-over- two sash.

North façade:

This facade continues unbroken from front to back. windows on each floor centered under the cross gable, each sashes. There are single with six-over - six

South façade:

The center of this facade is broken by the projecting L. Centered under the gable there is a window on each floor, each containing a six-over-six sash. The second floor window retains its original shutters.

To the west of the cross-gable, under the verandah, there door like the one on the front, also with its shutters. A door opens onto the east end of the verandah. is a French from the L

On the south side of the kitchen wing there is a door to the left and a window to the right with six-over six sash.

East façade:

There is a six-over- six window on the second floor centered under the ga.ble. On the first floor the left bay contains another such window. To the right there is a renovated former shed or summer kitchen.

Chain of title

PATENT - September 3, 1845 The Crown to Archibald Donald McDonald All of Lot

B&S 1#7719 June 23, 1854 - Registered, June 24, 1854 Archibald Donald McDonald et ux to William Lee £70 - All of Lot

GRANT #11881 April 5, 1916 - Registered, April 7, 1916 Mary A. Lee (Widow) to Lillian J. & Edward Manning as joint tenants - with natural love & affection+ $1.00 – Part +Right of Way

GRANT #20272 May 5, 1923 - Registered, May 12, 1923 Edward C. & Lillian J. Manning to Edwin B. & Cleta M. Reid as joint tenants $2750.00 - Part+ Right of Way

GRANT #22471 March 20, 1925 - Registered, March 21, 1925 Edwin B. & Cleta M. Reid to Henry T. W. E. Bradburn $2400.00 - Part+ Right of Way

GRANT #24986 April 11, 1927 - Registered, May 9, 1927 Henry T. W. E. Bradburn et ux to Joseph A. Barnard $6000.00 - Part+ Right of Way

GRANT #24987 May 2, 1927 - Registered, May 9, 1927 Joseph A. Barnard (widower) to Joseph Henderson Divers+ $1.00 - Part+ Right of Way - Tax Affidavit, $6000.

GRANT #24988 May 31 1927 - Registered, May 9, 1927 Joseph Henderson et ux to Frederick C. & Ellen J. Miller as joint tenants Divers+ $1.00 - Part+ Right of Way - Tax Affidavit , $6000.

GRANT #39979 June 1, 1944 - Registered, June 29, 1944 Frederick C. Miller (widower) to Henry P. & Amy L. Mather as joint Tenants cons - $4000 . 00 - Part - subject to Right of Way

GRANT 1104980 December 5, 1958 - Registered, March 11, 1960 Henry P. Mather (also known as Harry P. Mather) to Amy L. Mather $1.00 - Part, subject to Right of Way

GRANT 111909 December 6, 1960 - Registered, January 4, 1961 Amy L. Mather to Charles & Emily Collard as joint tenants

GRANT 134508 March 25, 1963 - Registered September 5, 1963 Charles & Emily Collard to Emily Collard $1.00 - Part, subject to Right of established lane

GRANT #402108 August 3, 1983 - Registered, August 15, 1953 Emily Collard to Catherine Ruth Taylor Part

GRANT #4 71481 July 30, 1987 - Catherine R. Taylor to Marion Karin Tracey

GRANT #502281 cons - $7000.00 - Part, subject to established lane January 31, 1989 - Marion Karin

82 Dublin St

Location and legal description: City of Peterborough, plan 132, lots 3 and 4 - formerly part Lot 4, north Dublin, east Water

Site and setting:

The house is located on the north side of Dublin Street where it meets the river. It occupies a triangular waterfront lot at the point where the river spreads westward to form the bay known as the Goose Pond.

Date of construction: 1926

Architect: W.R.L. Blackwell

Builders: Unknown

Owner and occupant: Robert David Tuckerman

Significance:

The house is one of several houses designed in variations on the theme of the English cottage by a well-known local architect, Walter R.L. Blackwell. Blackwell was the son of one of Peterborough's first native-born architects, William Blackwell and was a partner in his father's firm, which later became Craig, Zeidler, and Strong. As well as designing residences, he was also architect for the Bank of Toronto, for which he designed buildings in Ontario and other provinces. While the cottage style was quite popular in the years between the two World Wars, few such houses were built in Peterborough, all or nearly all designed by Walter Blackwell. The SuttonDeyman house is one of his best designs and has been meticulously maintained.

Historical background:

Lots 3 and 4 of Plan 132 were originallyy part of the extensive landholdings on the west bank of the Otonabee River of Samuel Dickson, the city's most important lumber baron and founder of the Dickson Co, which eventually became the Peterborough Lumber Co. At his death in 1870 they passed to his widow and children, Mary Ann Hazlitt, Ellen Walsh, Elizabeth Davidson, Charlotte Dickson, and Martha Dickson, who in turn sold them to the Dickson Company in 1890. In 1908 they were subdivided into lots along what is now the northern part of Waterford Street and the eastern side of Harvey Street. The lots were sold in 1924 to Dr. Norman Sutton and his wife Agnes, who built the present house, the first on the site, in 1926. The Suttons appear to have lived in the house for only a few years before moving to Toronto, and during much of the 1930s it was rented. In 1946 the house was sold to Mr. and Mrs. Percy McCarrell, and in 1963 it was purchased Mr. and Mrs Harry Deyman. Mr. Deyman, who became a judge of the Provincial Court, died in 1975. His widow continued to live in the house until 1989, at which time she sold it to the present occupant, Mr. Robert Tuckerman.

Architectural description for designation by-law:

This irregularly-shaped two-story house is located on the north side of Dublin Street and is oriented east and west. The house is essentially L-shaped, with the ell or rear projection nearly doubling the width of the western two-thirds of the house. It is oriented east and west, and the longest facade is the south, which faces the street and contains the main entrance. The concrete foundation and the frame construction are both covered with stucco. A one-story addition containing a garage at the front end has been added to the original house.

The front or longer part of the house has a gabled hip roof, while the rear extension has a truncated hip roof joining it at a right angle. Both are covered with sawn cedar shingles. The rafters are exposed behind the plain wooden fascia. An exterior chimney rises at the east end of the main body of the house. Its width at the first story level is double that above. The entire chimney is stuccoed and the shoulders are shingled.

The south façade:

This is the main and longest facade. It contains four bays. The second story projects slightly over the first and is carried on five corbels which are covered with stucco. All the windows are inward-opening casements containing diamond-shaped panes held in lead cames and have lug sills. The recessed frames are stained wood, and there is no exterior trim. The westernmost bay on the first floor contains a double casement, while the two eastern bays contain triple casements. The second bay from the west contains the main door, recessed within a rectangular opening all constructed of stained oak. There is a plain oak frame on the exterior, the lintel of which is gently shaped at top and bottom and the ends of which slant outward beyond the edges of the side pieces. The lintel is joined to each side piece by two prominent wooden pegs. Within the opening there is a plain oak door frame with moulded edges. The door itself is constructed of six vertical v-grooved oak planks and is hung on two wrought-iron strap hinges. On the second story the westernmost and the two easternmost bays each contain double casements. The bay over the door contains an oriel window with a double casement in the center and single casements at the sides.

The east façade:

On either side of the chimney on the first floor are small single casements. There are no openings on the second floor.

The west façade:

The original openings at the first floor level on the west facade have been eliminated by the addition of the one-story wing. On the second story there are two double casements.

The north façade:

On the first story of the north facade of the projecting extension there is a small double casement to the west and a large bay window to the east with a triple central casement and single casements to the sides. Above the bay there is a double casement. On the eastern side of the extension there is a door on the first floor near the inner corner and above a single casement to the right of center. The original triple casement on the north facade of the main body of the house has been replaced by a single fixed pane. A rectangular porch the depth of the extension nearly fills in the angle between it and the main body of the house. It is floored with a concrete slab and the simple lintels and slightly slanted roof are carried on double six-by-six posts at the inner corners and three posts at the outer one. There are simple solid brackets connecting the inner post to the lintel. Above the porch on the north facade of the main body there is a door at the inner angle leading onto the porch roof and a double casement very near the eastern end.

#2385 - APPOINTMENT OF NEW TRUSTEES - June 5, 1875 - Robert Nichols and William Hall, trustees to Thomas G. Hazlitt and Richard Hall -land - all lot 4, north Dublin and east Water and other land

RECITALS - Whereas Samuel Dickson, lumber merchant, died on 26 Apr 1870 - Will of deceased provides that estate be held in trust for the life of his widow, Anne Dickson, and on her death the estate to be divided among his children

#9306 - CONVEYANCE - December 7, 1889 - Thomas G. Hazlitt and Richard Hall, trustees, to the Dickson Company of Peterborough Ltd - land - all lot 4 and other land - this- instrument is given pursuant to an agreement between the parties and the trustees are now the holders of shares in the capital stock of the corporation - consideration $1.00

#9800 - DEED OF LAND - November 24, 1890 - The Dickson Co. of Peterborough Ltd to T.G. Hazlitt and Richard Hall - land all lot 4 and other land

#9801 - CONVEYANCE - November 24, 1890 - T.G. Hazlitt and Richard Hall to Mary A. Hazlitt et al - land - all lot 4 and other land - consideration $1.00

#9802 - CONVEYANCE - November 24, 1890 - Mary Ann Hazlitt, Thomas George Hazlitt, Ellen Walsh, William Walsh, Elizabeth Davidson, William Davidson, Charlotte Dickson, and Martha Dickson to The Dickson Company of Peterborough, Ltd. - land - all lot 4 and other land - Consideration $193,000

#15051 - CONVEYANCE - May 17, 1901 - The Dickson Co. of Peter borough Ltd (and) Richard Hall and Elizabeth Davidson re estate of Samuel Dickson re interests inadvertently omitted from an earlier conveyance to The Peterboro Hydraulic Power Co. Ltd. - land - all lot 4 and other land, including all "water privileges" - Consideration $100,000

#16101 - RELEASE - 28 February, 1903 - Mary Ann Hazlitt, executrix of the estate of Thomas George Hazlitt to the Dickson Co. of Peterborough Ltd. - land - all lot 4 and other land - Whereas Thomas George Hazlitt was appointed as trustee by

#2385 - and whereas Samuel Dickson owed Thos. Geo. Hazlitt $8000 and interest at the date of his death - and whereas the said sum has been paid in full - this release given to clear up title

#2428 - GRANT - April 16, 1907 - Richard Hall, sole surviving trustee of Samuel Dickson to The Dickson Co. of Peterborough Ltd. - land - all lot 4 and other land - consideration $1.00 Plan 132 - April 30, 1908 - signed by The Dickson Co. of Peterboro as owner - subdivides lot 4, N. Dublin, E. Water and other land

#20036 - March 10, 1923 - Petition for extension of main by The Dickson Co. of Peterboro Ltd. - all lots 3 & 4, plan 132

#22098 - GRANT - November 6, 1924 - The Dickson co. of Peter borough to Norman Henry Sutton and Agnes Frances Sutton land - all lots 3 &4, Plan 132 - consideration $700

#24406 - GRANT - September 29, 1926 - Norman Henry Sutton and Agnes Frances Sutton to Agnes Frances Sutton - land - all lots 3 & 4

#39287 - GRANT - December 1, 1943 - Agnes Frances Sutton to Agnes F. Sutton, Norman H. Sutton physician, Walter R. Sutton geologist, & Ruth S. Sutton - land - all lots 3 & 4

#427001 - BYLAW #4447 - December 28, 1945 - a bylaw to stop up part of an allowance for highway, being that part of lots 3 & 4, Plan 132 situate within the Reserve on Plan 1 - this bylaw permits the City of Peterborough to close up and sell a portion of the 66'-wide reserve running parallel with the shores of the Otonabee River and crossing parts of lots 3 & 4 on Plan 132

#43140 - GRANT - March 25, 1946 - the Corporation of the City of Peterborough to Norman H. Sutton, physician of the City of Toronto - land - part lots 3 & 4, Plan 132 situate within the Reserve and as shown on sketch prepared by J. W. Pierce, OCS

#43266 - GRANT - April 5, 1946 - Norman H. Sutton, Walter R. Sutton, and Ruth Sutton Elliot, and Marion Sutton, wife of Walter R. Sutton (whereas Agnes Frances Sutton died on December 2, 1943) to Percy M. McCarrell and Mabel M. McCarrell - lots 3 & 4, Plan 132 - $9,400

#135177 - GRANT - October 1, 1963 - Percy M. McCarrell (and whereas Mabel M. McCarrell died on December 28, 1958) to Harry Rosswell Deyman and Jane W. Deyman - land - lots 3 & 4, Plan 132 - $33,000

 #501791 - DEPOSIT - Jan 23, 1989 - Death certificate for Judge Harry Rosswell Deyman, deceased November 15, 1975, in Barrie, interred at Little Lake cemetery

#502286 - GRANT - January 31, 1989 - Jane W. Deyman to Robert David Tuckerman - land - lots 3 & 4, Plan 132 - $265,000

607 Stewart St

Legal description:

607 Stewart Street, being Lot 2, plan 17, City and County of Peterborough

Owners and occupants: 1996- Robert J. and Mary Elizabeth Hinton

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION- ca 1888-1890

Architect: Probably John E. Belcher. Belcher was the architect of the house just south at 603, and very probably also of the house behind it at 602 Rubidge Street. Both 601 Stewart and 602 Rubidge show characteristic Belcher details.

Builder: unknown

Site and setting:

The house is set on the west side of Stewart Street at the crest of the hill, in a neighbourhood of mostly late Victorian houses. It is just down the street from the stone house, built in the 1840's and later owned by the lumber -baron Mossam Boyd. It was later the residence of the noted local architect John Belcher, who appears to have been the designer of several houses in the area.

Significance:

The house is extremely well preserved and has suffered no significant alterations since its construction. It shows many of the characteristic details of the designs of the noted Peterborough architect John Belcher, who was the designer of the house just south at 603 Stewart street. Just behind the latter house, at 602 Rubidge Street there is another house with Belcher details and very like 607 Stewart, though on a smaller scale. Both houses reflect the details of the larger and more elaborate Hazlitt House at 570 Water Street, also almost certainly a Belcher design.

Historical background:

The house was constructed for David Dumble, whose large house in the Gothic style was close by at the corner of London and Reid streets. He had both 607 Stewart and 602 Rubidge built as speculative investments and owned a number of properties in the city. The Stewart street house appears to have served as a rental property until it was sold by Mr.Dumble In 1918

Architectural description of the building for designation by-law:

The two-story rectangular house is oriented east and west. A narrower one-and-one-half-story kitchen wing extends to the west at the rear, and its north wall is flush with that of the main house. There is a slightly projecting two-story bay approximately in the center of the south facade crowned with a gable. A central chimney rises just to the rear of the junction of the gable, roof with the main roof. The main roof is hipped and carried over quite wide projecting eaves. The soffits are made of tongued and grooved boards, and the cornice consists of two bands of moulding, the lower decorated with a type of dentillation. The gable, which has returned eaves, is constructed in the same manner. All the windows in the main body of the house have rounded shoulders, moulded wooden trim, wooden lugged sills, and with one exception, contain one over-one double-hung sash. Those on the first floor all have transoms filled with coloured glass in various designs. All have heavy round-shouldered flat-faced cast stone head surrounds with projecting central keystones, as does the main entrance door.

East or front façade:

This facade consists of two bays. On the right is the main entrance, consisting of a double-leaved door under a transom. The doorway is surrounded with moulded wood trim with rounded shoulders at the top. Each door has in the upper half a large clear glass pane surrounded with moulded and carved decoration and a lower square wooden panel with moulding and a central rosette. To the left of the door is a double window with moulded mullions dividing the two windows and transoms. The sashes here are fixed, each with two panes separated by a horizontal glazing bar. On the second floor there are windows in each bay. A porch with a hipped roof extends across the facade. It is carried on three full and two half turned posts, the original bases of which have been removed and replaced by concrete blocks.

South façade:

This facade consists of three bays, with single windows in each of the west and east bays. In the center of the facade is a projecting gabled bay. The gable contains a rectangular louvered opening with a semi-circular top. Further central bays project on each floor, that on the first floor being deeper, having its own decorated cornice, and incorporating a rounded bay containing a pair of windows. The bay on the second floor also contains two windows in a slightly recessed panel with two courses of corbelled brick decoration, at the top. The head surrounds on these pairs of windows are double versions of the surrounds on other openings. This scheme is nearly identical to those on several other houses designed by John Belcher. The south side of the rear extension contains a simple door and, to its left, a rectangular window with wood trim and lugged si11 containing two-over-two double-hung sash. A hipped-roofed porch is flush with the main facade. The porch has recently been provided with turned posts and decoration resembling what must have once existed on the front.

North façade:

There is a window on each floor in the centre of this facade. A smaller window without a head surround is placed toward the back on the second floor. On the north facade of the rear wing there is a central window on each floor, each under a flat arch with a projecting cast keystone, and each containing a two-over-two double-hung sash. The upper window extends through the cornice line into a gabled half dormer.

West façade:

There are no openings on the west facade of the main block of the house, except for a rectangular one-over-one window in the west wall on the first floor under the rear porch. The rear wall of the extension is not brick and is sided with metal clapboards.

PATENT February 23, 1843 The Crown to John M. Bartley All ¼ acre

B&S #632 - November 23, 1870 - Registered, November 28, 1870 John M. Bartley et ux (by their Attys Alex. S. & Geo. A Kirkpatrick)to John Chambers $800. - All ½ acre and other land

MORT. #707 - March 9, 1871 - Registered, March 10, 1871 John Chambers et ux to Western Canada P.B. & L.S. $2,000. - All ½ acre-and other land

ASST of MORT #2353- May 7, 1875 - Registered, May 15, 1875 Western Canada L&S Co. to Francis M. Haultain $2,557.05 - All ½ acre, Ass't of #707

ASST of MORT #4226 - June 1, 1878 - Registered, September 20, 1879 Francis M. Haultain to Peterboro R.E.I. Co. $1,873. - All, Ass't-of #707 & other land

CONVEYANCE #6391 - November 3, 1884 - Registered, December 2, 1884 Peterboro R.E.I.Co. to David W. Dumb1e $1,300. - All ¼ acre-Conveyed under Power of Sale in Mortgage #707

GRANT 15568 - October 24, 1918 - Registered, February 17, 1920 David W. Dumb1e et ux to Elizabeth L. Reid Love and Affection &: $5:'"00 - All and use of lane as on plan

GRANT #35275 - April 25, 1940 - Registered June 5, 1940 Elizabeth L.D. Reid (wid) to Stanley & Ernest Braund $1,600. - ALL and use of lane as on Plan

GRANT #35369 - July 5, 1940 - Registered July 8, 1940 Stanley Braund et ux & Ernest Braund to Vivian Jordon $1.00 & C. - All & use of lane on P1an-2 an APF. $2,200.

GRANT #37898 - September 25, 1942 - Registered September 26, 1942 Vivian Jordon to Benjamin Johnson $2,700. - All and use of lane on Plan

GRANT #37901 - September 22, 1942 - Registered September26, 1942 Benjamin Johnsom et ux to Eva L. Hendren $3,000. - All -do- Subject to Mortgage

GRANT #38678 - September 28. 1943 - Registered April 19, 1944 Eva L. Hendren to Alphonse E. & Josephine F. Feeley, Joint Tenants $3,500. - All -do –

GRANT #40933 - July 19, 1945 - Registered July 20, 1945 Alphonse E. & Josephine F. Feeley to Martin, Mary & Francis McNee, Joint Tenants $3,500. - All -do-

GRANT #42748 - January 8, 1946 - Registered January 9, 1946 Martin, Mary & Francis McNee to Martin & Mary McNee Nat. Love & Aff'n $1.00 – All-do

GRANT #49627 - November 9, 1948 - Registered November 25, 1948 Martin & Mary McNee to Joseph A. & Mary A. Lebasseur, Joint Tenants $6,500. - All - do- -

GRANT #54113 - May 26, 1950 - Registered June 13, 1950 Joseph A. & Mary A. LeVasseur by their Att'y James F. Dunn to Samuel & Eva A. Freeman $6,500 - All & Use of Lane on Plan

GRANT #255529 - July 9, 1973 - Registered September 19, 1973 Eva A. Freeman to Samuel & Joyce Hiles $26,500. – All - With Rt. pof Way - Federal Consent Annexed

GRANT #345377 March 28, 1979 Registered April 27, 1979 Samuel & Joyce Hiles to Tommaso De Carlo $2.00 + c. - All- with use of lane - Tax Aff't $47,900.

GRANT #430467 - Registered 14/06/85 Decarlo, Tommas to Robert & Mary Hinton All - with use of Lane on Plan 77

547 Water St


Legal description:

547 Water Street, being part of Lot Number 2, south of London Street and east of George Street in the city and County of Peterborough

SITE AND SETTING:

The house is set on the west side of Water street in a neighbourhood of mostly larger residential buildings dating from the mid- to late-nineteenth century.

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: ca. 1856

ARCHITECT/ BUILDER: unknown

Significance:

The house dates from an early period In the city's history and is typical of one storey brick houses which were being built in the 1850s. It retains its original window sash and fenestration, and despite some later changes to the front facade, the original house is clearly visible and largely unchanged. It had from the start a full-height basement containing the kitchen, and although the land around the house has been raised considerably since construction, the top sections of the original basement windows are still in place and visible - even more clearly on the 

interior.

Historical background:

The house was built by Robert Graham, a merchant, and it remained in the Graham family well into the second decade of the twentieth century.

Architectural description of the building for the designation by-law:

The narrow, east facade of this rectangular, one-storey brick house faces the west side of Water street, The low roof is carried on a plain soffit, now replaced with white painted metal, and a plain fascia. While the east or front facade now has a gable with a triple window and fish-scale shingling, presumably that has replaced an original hipped roof like that in the rear. Original side chimneys on the south and west facades have been removed below the roofline. A full-width extension to the rear of nearly half the length of the original house was added, probably shortly after the initial construction. It is clearly visible from the slightly darker color of the later brick. The solid brick walls are laid in stretcher bond on the front facade and in common bond elsewhere. They are carried on a plinth of three brick courses above a foundation of granite rubble. This foundation must originallyy have been higher than it now appears. All the window openings are of the same size and are rectangular, under flat brick voussoirs. The plain trim and lugged sills are wooden. All windows are six-over-six double-hung sashes with very narrow glazing bars.

East facade: 

This is the front or steet facade. It contains three bays, with two windows and a door in the left or south bay. The door opening has a two-pane transom and simple mouldings. The door itself, with a single large fielded panel, may not be orlg1nal. A porch with a shed roof and a foundation and column bases of cut fieldstone, with short tapered square columns, is a later addition to this facade. The shingled gable with its triple window was presumably added at the same time, replacing what was probably the original hipped roof. The gable has a dentillated fascia.

South facade: 

There are two widely spaced windows in the original length of the house on this facade, and in the later rear addition a door with a triple-paned transom and simple mouldings with a window to its left. There is a modern frame addition to the rear.

North facade:

On this facade there are three windows in the original house and one in the latest addition, with a small more recent window to its left.

PATENT 26 January, 1843 The Crown to Louisa Forbes All one-half acre

B&S #8061 29 August, 1854 reg. 11 September 1654 James and Louisa Wallis to George F. Orde and George Dunford part - one-sixth acre

B&S #0306 29 August 1854 reg. 12 April 1856 James Wallis et ux to Robert Graham Part one-sixth acre

B&S #12917 21 February 1859 reg. 22 February 1859 Robert Graham at ux to William Stevenson part one-sixth acre

B&S #532 2 March 1870 reg. 13 July 1870 William Stevenson et ux to Anne Graham Part one-sixth acre

B&S #120631 September 1894 reg. 1 September 1694 Anne Graham (widow) to Hampden Burnham Parts S. two-thirds of lot

Deed #3747 16 March 1898 reg. 18 march 1898 J. Hampden Burnham (unmarried) to Anne Graham Part Grant 29 November 1917 reg. 16 December 1917 Wm. G. Morrow & Mildred E. Palmer (formerly Mildred E. Lovekin) surviv1ng executors of Anne Graham (deceased)and Mildred E. Palmer (personally) to John S. and Ella McFarlane Part (See recitals)

Grant 21 June 1944 reg. 27 June 1944 Ell McFarlane to Marion McFarlane and Laura Moore (joint tenants) Part - Tax Aff. $1600

Grant 16 June 1947 reg. 14 July 1947 Marion I. McFarlane and Laura Moore to John M. & Myrtle H. Lowes Part Certificate The Treasurer of Ontario certifies that all duty in estate of John M. Lowes dec. has been paid Called pt. of Lot 2, S. London and W. George as in 46091

Grant 11 July 1963 reg. 26 July 1963 Myrtle Lowes (widow) to T.V. Hart, Charles Elliott, Les Copp, ROSS L. Dobbin, Mary Elliott, William J. Hamilton, P. Melville McCarrell, Gordon C. Miller, Everett Sackv11le, Charles H. Saunders, & Maxwell Yelland, Trustees of the congregation of George street United Church – Ex’r of est. of Wm. Cochrane Part

Grant 16 August 1979 reg. 24 August 1979 James W. Gimblett - ex'r of Will of Emily Cochrane, dec'd, to Barbara L. Maloney Part with Subj. to Rt. of Way

Grant 11 12 81 Maloney, Barbara L. & Maloney, T. Edmond, as party of Third Part to Smeding, William P. Parts, with subj. to rights of way as on plan No. 351182

Grant reg. 30 07 82 Smeding, William P., Smeding, Diane, to Wiltshire, Daniel M. & Wiltshire, Carol M. (JT) Part - with and subj. to Rts. of way as on plan in No 351182

Grant 30 03 84 Wiltshire, Daniel M., and Wiltshire, Carol M., to Houlahan, Michael G.I. and Houlahan, Pauline S. Part - with & subj. to rights of way as shown on plan in No. 351182

Grant 10 06 88 Houlahan, Michael, G.I. and Houlahan, Pauline Sara to Whiteman, Marguerite June part - with & subject to rights of way as shown in plan 351182

Grant 92 04 24 Whiteman, Marguerite June to Whittington, Allan Roy, and Wilke, Marion Catherine Part - subject to rights of way as in plan in 351182

110 Antrim St

Street Address: 110 Antrim Street

Roll Number: 15 14 040 080 03500

PIN Number: 281310028

Short Legal Description: Part of Lot 2, north of Antrim Street and East of Water Street, City of Peterborough, County of Peterborough, being Part 1, Plan 45R6128 for the said City of Peterborough Together with a right of way over Part 2, Plan 45R6128, being part of said lot. As set out in instrument number 469452

Owner’s Concurrence: yes / no

Designation Application Start: April 2003

On-Site Evaluation Date: May 30, 2003

PACAC Application Approval Date: June 2003

Heritage Evaluation Classification: A

Heritage Type:

Built Heritage – buildings

Built Heritage - interiors

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act - Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: November 14, 2003

Comments:

  • It must be stressed that interior paint colour schemes and wallpaper choices are not part of the scope of this heritage designation – only fixed, interior architectural elements as identified and described in this document.
  • Future owners are encouraged to adhere to an Arts and Crafts interior paint colour scheme and/or to incorporate reproduction period wallpapers, friezes and stencils when decorating.
  • Future property owners are encouraged to restore original cladding on exterior wall surfaces and to work in collaboration with PACAC as prescribed in the Heritage Act.

SHORT STATEMENT OF THE REASONS FOR THE DESIGNATION

110 Antrim Street is of architectural value as an excellent and relatively rare example of a pure Arts and Crafts or Craftsman style bungalow. The house was constructed, about 1924 for G. Clarke Staples and his wife Elizabeth, on a tight curving lot. It is a prominent neighbourhood landmark overlooking the "Goose Pond", (itself a significant cultural landscape). As such, the building is classified as 'Category A' under PACAC heritage evaluation criteria.

Like most Arts and Crafts bungalows, the house is characterized by a low-pitched roofline suggesting that the property is only one storey in height – when in fact there is considerable living space under the eaves. The house has wide, overhanging open eaves 'supported' by decorative wooden brackets (also known as knee braces), wood eaves and exposed rafter tails; elements common to this architectural style. The building is distinguished by its slightly unusual ‘jerkin head’ roof in which the gable ends are clipped to create a slight hip at the eaves. Jerkin head roofs were popular in 1920s residential architecture. Standard gable and hip roofs were, however, more common on Arts and Crafts houses.

The house also exhibits several unusual window shapes including casement, arched, half-round windows and an early picture window on the front facade. It also features a rare wire cut brick chimney on the east facade. Certain interior elements in the main floor hallway, dining room and living room are included in the designation.

ORIGINAL OWNER(s): G. Clarke and Elizabeth Staples

ARCHITECT(s): unknown

BUILDER(s) / ARTISAN(s): unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1924 (estimate)

CONTEXT - SITE AND SETTING:

With its prominent location on a corner lot near the bank of the Goose Pond in the Otonabee River, 110 Antrim Street (at Elcombe Crescent) is a significant landmark structure. It is among the most important heritage properties within a generally wellpreserved late Victorian and Edwardian neighbourhood in the Town Ward.

The house and attached garage occupy the western portion of the lot and present a generally square, though slightly irregular "footprint".

The eastern portion of the lot is beautifully landscaped with flower-beds, shrubs, ornamental trees, stone pathways, fences, wood trellises, pergola and other Arts and Crafts inspired garden features.

The property line running along Antrim Street, is delineated by a reproduction wood picket fence. The rear property line is marked with a tall, board fence with small pergolas over the garden gates. Fence posts are adorned with diamond shaped copper caps.

The front façade of 110 Antrim faces one of the most varied and interesting cultural landscapes in the City, comprising the Goose Pond, the London Street footbridge, Quaker Oats, the power dam, the site of Samuel Dickson’s lumber mill, spires of St. Paul's Presbyterian Church and George Street United Church, the former Westclox factory and other natural and built features.

The railway bridge of the Cobourg and Peterborough Railway Company once crossed the Otonabee River just to the north and east of the property.

The right-of-way for this rail line ran just to the north, cutting through Elcombe (or Harvey Street as it was known until the late 1920s) on its way toward the crossing at Water Street and Parkhill Road. An unique grouping of modest, stucco clad cottages, built in the 1880s, run diagonally along this former right-of-way behind 110 Antrim – an interesting ‘relic’ of the 19th century railway era.

Heritage Attributes

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, together with construction materials of wood, concrete, stucco and glazing, their related building techniques, specific interior features and landscape features:

  • ‘jerkin head’ roof
  • wide, overhanging open eaves 'supported' by decorative wooden brackets (also known as knee braces);
  • tongue and groove wood soffits (the underside of the roof sheathing) with narrow wooden fascias and exposed rafter tails;
  • concrete foundation with the surface uniformly scored to suggest ashlar stone coursing;
  • small wooden awning cellar windows.

South Elevation

  • asymmetrical 3 bay arrangement dominated by prominent, enclosed, square front porch protected by a ‘jerkin-head’ roof with open, bracketed, wooden eaves in the centre bay;
    • broad, shallow wooden stairs along the south wall of the house leading to main entrance
    • shingle-clad knee wall flanking entry stairs
    • heavy, stucco covered square piers surmounted by wooden capitals;
    • all porch trim including box-beam/wooden frieze, trim mouldings, wood shingle wall cladding
    • all windows including wooden casement windows and two light, rectangular transoms together with the openings, wood frames, sills, muntins and glazing;
    • entrance including double-leafed glazed wooden entry doors, wood panels, flanking wooden casement windows, transoms, together with the openings, wood frames, sills, muntins and glazing;
    • main entryway into the house including oak door together with metal hardware the opening, wood frames, sills, and glazing;
  • all casement windows on the south elevation of the house including transoms together with the openings, wood frames, sills, muntins and glazing;
  • large wood framed plate glass window together with the openings, wood frames, sills, muntins, glazing and heavy wood mullions;
  • shed dormer together with boxed wooden eaves and wood shingle cladding;

East Elevation

  • painted wood shingle wall cladding;
  • shallow, squared bay window, including broadly overhanging shed roof together with exposed rafters and fascias;
  • all casement windows on the east elevation of the house together with the openings, wood frames, sills, muntins and glazing;
  • semi-circular window together with the openings, wood frames, sills, muntins and glazing;
  • wire cut brick chimney

North Elevation

  • all casement windows on the north elevation of the house together with the openings, wood frames, sills, muntins and glazing;
  • shed dormer together with boxed wooden eaves and wood shingle cladding;
  • enclosed wood frame vestibule for basement stairs including entry door together with trim, wood siding, frames and sills;
  • sloping wooden overhang above the back door leading into the house together with wooden support brackets, eaves and trim;

West Elevation

  • attached 'sunken' garage including wood balustrade, original shiplap wood siding, wooden steps, railings, newel post and deck at the back entrance, together with paneled garage doors and their opening, wood frame, muntins, and glazing;
  • painted wood shingle wall cladding;
  • shallow, squared bay window, including broadly overhanging shed roof together with exposed rafters and fascias;
  • all casement windows on the west elevation of the house together with the openings, wood frames, sills, muntins and glazing;
  • semi-circular window together with the openings, wood frames, sills, muntins and glazing;

Interiors Elements Included in Heritage Designation:

Certain fixed, architectural elements found in the dining room, living room and main hallway corridor (running from front entrance to dining room) of 110 Antrim Street have been identified for inclusion in this heritage designation. These original or early features are identified as follows:

  • coffered stained wood ceilings;
  • picture rails together with 'frieze' area between picture rails and ceilings;
  • unpainted patterned brick fire place in living room;
  • built-in cupboard in dining room with frosted glass double doors together with hardware, drawers and shelving;
  • all stained wood elements including: French doors, hardwood flooring, baseboards, doors, door surrounds and window surrounds;
  • interior window hardware; heating and cold-air return grates; beveled glass door knobs, textured ceilings.

HISTORICAL DESCRIPTION:

The house was constructed about 1924. The first owners were G. Clarke Staples and his wife Elizabeth. Mr. Staples was a sales manager with J.J. Turner and Sons, a well known local supplier of canvas tents, flags and camping equipment. In the 1930s the house was sold to Harvey G. McGinness. By 1943 it was owned by James E. McIlmoyle and his wife Harriet. About 1955 the house was purchased J. Ronald Knox, manager of Knox Jewelers, a well-known downtown business that was located at 388 George Street North. The Knox family owned the house until the mid 1970s. 110 Antrim changed hands two or three more times before being purchased in the 1990s by the current owner, Edward Smith.

Between the time of the Birsdall town survey of 1825 and house construction in the mid 1920s, the lot remained unoccupied. The Romaine map of 1875 indicates that in the mid 19th century, the empty lot was owned by George Dunsford. Just to the south of this property, across the Goose Pond, was the Samuel Dickson Lumber Company. The Arts and Crafts or Craftsman style was popular in North America from the mid 1890s to the mid 1940s. It peaked in popularity before World War One. Its origins were to be found in the English Arts and Crafts movement. Proponents of the Arts and Crafts championed individual hand-craftsmanship over mass production and the integration of built forms with nature. They also tended to romanticize medieval design techniques and the work of small craft guilds.

In virtually every example of an Arts and Crafts style residence, careful attention was paid to interior detailing. Owners of Arts and Crafts homes were encouraged to decorate within a specific range of furniture pieces and accessories such as hand hammered copper light fixtures, table lamps, fireplace hoods, vases and candle sticks. Art tiles and pottery, painted stencils, and textiles adorned with stylized floral motifs were also popular. Simple, quarter-sawn oak furniture pieces were considered essential.

The aesthetic principles of the movement were to be reflected both inside and outside of the house. The overall design approach taken in most instances was to create a tranquil, un-cluttered, informal, restful atmosphere using muted colours, patterned wallpapers and stencils with naturalistic motifs (e.g. William Morris willow boughs wallpaper), also dark stained woodwork and subdued lighting. In Arts and Crafts homes, the living room often replaced the parlour as the focal point for occupants and guests.

The English proponents of the Arts and Crafts movement included: William Morris (1834-1896), John Ruskin (1819-1900) and C.F.A. Voysey (1869-1944) and Richard Norman Shaw (1831-1912). In North America, the Arts and Crafts style was popularized by American designer and furniture maker, Gustav Stickley (1858-1942) and Pasadena, California architects Charles Sumner Greene and his brother Henry Mather Greene. This style of architecture is also commonly described as: "Craftsman style", "Craftsman bungalow" and sometime, "Mission style bungalow".

The ground floor interior of 110 Antrim Street retains most of the structural elements found in a well-appointed Arts and Crafts home as outlined above. In fact, this Arts and Crafts interior is among the best preserved in this region.

361 Park St N

Street Address: 361 Park Street, North

Roll Number: 030-050-00200-0000

PIN Number: 280840157

Short Legal Description: Pt Lts 32 & 33, Pl 65, amended by Pl 79, amended by Pl 88

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation:

The house is a well-preserved early example of the substantial homes built by the political and economic leaders of Peterborough as it entered a period of prosperity and growth in the middle of the nineteenth century. The architecture is simple and straightforward, but its generous proportions and substantial character distinguish it from many other buildings of its period. It is also notable as an early example of brick construction, which was still relatively uncommon in the city in 1850.

The house is also noteworthy for its historical associations. George Boulton for whom the house was built, was part of the influential Toronto Boulton family who were among the most prominent members of the “Family Compact”. He was a minister in the Provincial government, a financier, and a major investor in the Cobourg and Peterborough Railway. From 1857 until the end of the century it was home to the family of the Rev. John Gilmour, who established a mission to the native people about 1837 on the Chemong road and became minister to the city’s first Baptist congregation. The noted novelist and literary critic Robertson Davies owned the house during the years 1951 to 1963, when he was the editor and publisher of the Peterborough Examiner. Since that time it has been occupied by Tom Symons, the founding president of Trent University, and his wife Christine.

Site and setting:

The house is set back from the street, behind a low iron picket fence, on a large landscaped lot on the west side of Park Street. It is one of the largest and most prominent houses in this area of substantial homes dating from the latter half of the nineteenth century and the early twentieth century. The property, originallyy in Monaghan Township, marks the border between the original city and the “west end” which was built up at the end of the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated: 

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Brick walls- Flemish bond on east & south facades, stretcher bond on the west & north; low limestone foundation;
low-sloped hipped roof including wide eaves, plain fascia and soffits with an interior molding; all brick chimneys;
all windows together with the openings, lintels as plastered and painted, lugged wooden sills with simple molding beneath, moulded wooden frames, 2/2, 4/4, 6/6, 6/3 and fixed window sash, muntins and glazing; painted cast iron cresting; all entrances and their openings including single and double leaved doors together with wooden panels, fanlight, moulded wood trim, wood frames, sills, muntins and glazing; plastered walls and attendant wood framing.

Architectural description:

The large irregularly shaped house is constructed of solid brick above a very low limestone foundation. The brick is laid in Flemish bond on the east (front) and south facades and in stretcher bond on the west and north. There is a lowsloped hipped roof above wide eaves with plain fascia and soffits with an interior molding. There are three chimneys: one in the center, one in the eastern bay of 5 the north façade, and one partly exterior chimney in the eastern bay of the south façade. Except as noted, all windows have plain lintels extending beyond the frames which appear to be plastered and are painted; have lugged wooden sills with a simple molding underneath; have simple moulded wooden frames, and contain 2/2 wooden sashes.

East (front) facade: 

The southern two bays of the three-bay façade project about seven feet forward giving the impression of a two-bay entrance front. There are three windows on the second story and one in the southern bay of the first. The entire northern bay on the first floor is occupied by a projecting sun-porch constructed by the present owners within the last forty years.

The central bay contains the main entrance, behind a projecting brick vestibule, which may be of later construction. This vestibule has a flat roof surrounded by painted cast iron cresting, a plain boxed cornice, and a plain frieze. The doorway of the vestibule has a double-leaved door with glass panes above square fielded panels. It is surmounted by a fanlight and is surrounded by moulded wood trim consisting of a segmental arch between two uprights. A Roy photograph dated 1925 shows the doorway with a transom instead of the fanlight and without exterior wooden trim.

South facade: 

The three-bay façade is broken, with the western bay recessed about six feet. The eastern bay contains a partly external chimney extending through both stories. The central bay projects slightly. The Roy photograph shows that it originallyy contained a three-sided bay window on the first story, a single window on the second, and a closed gable or pediment with projecting cornices. Since the time of that photograph, a bay window has been built above the one on the first floor with plastered walls covered with wooden strips to create rectangular panels. Its roof is flat and the plain boxed metal cornice carries the line of the base of the pediment around the bay. The original brick field has been plastered and filled with rectangular panels created with applied wood strips. Both bay windows have 4/4 sashes in the central opening and 2/2 on the sides. Those on the first story have a continuous plain painted lintel.

There is a single window on the second floor of the recessed western bay. The first story of this bay contains a sun-porch which extends beyond the face of the bay window and has a full basement.

West facade: 

On the second story there is a centered window with the same features as the others, except for its 6/6 sashes. 6
In the southern half of the first story the original windows have been replaced with two double-leaved doors beneath two-light transoms, each leaf containing three panes above a rectangular wooden panel. There are painted, plastered lintels as elsewhere.

An attached brick structure with a shed roof extends across the northern half of this façade and well beyond the north wall. Probably once containing storage and a furnace room, it was extensively remodelled, to the design of nationally renowned architect Ron Thom, by the present owners. Bricked-up openings however still indicate the original openings. 

North Facade: 

On the second story there are two windows with 6/6 sashes, one in the center and one to the west. On the first story there are two similar windows slightly to the west of those above. The left one has 6/3 sashes. A section of more recent brickwork between these windows suggests that the fenestration here was originallyy different.

Historical description: 

George H. Reade purchased the property of nine acres from the Crown in 1827. After being transferred several times during the following seventeen years, it was purchased by the Hon. George Boulton in 1844. Boulton, a member of the influential Toronto family belonging to the “Family Compact”, was a financier and land speculator, as well as a minister in the Provincial government. He was a major investor in the eventually unsuccessful Cobourg and Peterborough Railway. Whether Boulton and his family, who lived originallyy in Cobourg, ever occupied the Peterborough house is unknown. In 1855 he sold it to George Orde, a well-known Peterborough resident.

In 1857 Orde sold the property to the Rev. John Gilmour, whose family occupied it until the end of the century. During that period portions of the estate were sold and provided land for several of the neighbouring houses. Having been converted to the Baptist faith while a prisoner of war, Gilmour immigrated to Canada and arrived in Peterborough about 1837 to establish a mission to the native people. The Gilmour Memorial Church on Chemong Road marks the site. He later moved to Peterborough to become the minister to the Baptist congregation. The annual Gilmour Memorial Lectures at the Murray Street Baptist Church are held in recognition of his role in the development of the church. One of his grandsons went on to found McMaster University.

After the death of Gilmour’s widow in 1900, the house passed through several owners until it was purchased by the novelist Robertson Davies in 1951. Davies was at that time editor and publisher of the Peterborough Examiner. He, in turn, 7 sold the house to Tom and Christine Symons when they moved to Peterborough in 1963 to found Trent University.

383 George St N

Street Address: 383 George St. North

Roll Number: 151404005020900

PIN Number: 28103007

Short Legal Description:

FIRSTLY: 383 George Street, being part of Lot 1, Registered plan 152, Formerly part of
Lot 1, South of Hunter and West of George Street, City of Peterborough, County of
Peterborough, and Part of Lot 2, South of Hunter and West of George Street, City of
Peterborough, County of Peterborough designated as Part 1 on Reference Plan 45R11266.

SECONDLY: Part of Lot 2, South of Hunter Street and West of George Street, City of
Peterborough, County of Peterborough, designated as Part 2 on reference Plan 45R11266 and Subject to a right-of-way in favour of those entitled thereto over Part of Lot 2, South of Hunter Street and West of George Street, City of Peterborough, County of Peterborough, designated as Part 2 on Reference Plan 45R-1266.

THIRDLY: Together with a right-of-way over Part of Lot 2 and 3, South of Hunter Street, West of George Street, City of Peterborough, County of Peterborough designated as Parts 8,10, 11, 122, 13, 14 and 15, on Reference Plan 45R-1443, subject to encroachments on said Parts 8, 10 and 15 shown on the said Plan. Part 8 being part of Lot 2. Part 10 being part of Lots 2 and 3. Parts 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15 being part of Lot 2.

Short statement of the reasons for designation:

The Bierk building is a good example of mid Victorian commercial architecture. The building holds a prominent place in the core of downtown Peterborough and is noted for its elongated windows with segmental tops on the second and third storeys and round topped windows on the fourth storey, all set in recessed brick panels. Also of note are iron pilasters flanking the ground floor façade. 383 George Street was originallyy the Bradburn drygoods store, built by Thomas Bradburn and James Stevenson in 1860. The design for the building is credited to Buffalo, New York architect, John Harley Selkirk (1808-1878) and was rendered in the "Buffalo Style". From the 1890s to the 1950s the building was the location of the Robert Fair and Company store, noted for the golden lion sculpture over the main entrance. Later it was the Bata Shoe outlet.

Heritage attributes to be designated: 

Good example of mid-Victorian commercial architecture, built by Thomas Bradburn and James Stevenson; -Likely designed by Buffalo, New York architect, John Harley Selkirk (1808-1878). -One of the first brick commercial blocks constructed in downtown Peterborough (circa 1860). -Location of the Thomas Bradburn drygood business, Robert Fair Company and Bata Shoe Store and studio and gallery of Canadian artist, David Bierk. -Tall, rectangular massing; -Red brick street façade; -Narrow, recessed brick panels framing window openings from second storey to top storey; -Original window openings on George Street façade with wood sills and brick voussoirs; -Iron pilasters flanking ground floor façade;

Site and context: 

383 George Street is a prominent landmark in downtown Peterborough. It holds a commanding presence with its four storey height - particularly since the adjacent buildings to the north and south no longer share a common roofline. The building once to the north of 383 George was the Cluxton Block (demolished in the mid 1970s). The building to the south originallyy had a fourth storey and a decorative cornice line matching the one on 383 George Street - all removed around 1913.

Architectural description:

383 George Street is a familiar and prominent commercial block in the downtown core. It retains its original window openings set in elongated brick recesses, along with iron pilasters on the street level. It was designed in the "Buffalo style" by John Harley Selkirk (1808-1878). Although the building has been undergone several renovations it retains architectural integrity.

Front/Street facade:

The street facade of this tall, rectangular commercial building, faces George Street. The flat roof, slopes to the back of the building, where at about the half-way mark in the length of the building, the structure drops down to two (2) storeys. The street facade presents four storeys. On the ground floor, two (2) original decorative iron pilasters flank the street facade. These pilasters are the only surviving elements of the original storefront. The second (2), third (3) and fourth (4) storey facades have been renovated but remain faithful to the original detailing, except for the cornice on the upper storey (removed about 1913). In the late 1990s David Bierk acquired the building and adorned the lost cornice area with a mural waterscape. The solid red brick walls are laid in a stretcher bond on the front and in common bond elsewhere. They are carried on three brick courses above a stone foundation. The front facade was carefully cleaned and re-painted during the Bierk renovations. The second and third floor facade has five bays, with the three bays of single windows set in a recessed brick panel. The fourth and fifth bays share this recess. This bay is also the original central bay of 381 and 383 George Street, North. The fourth floor only has four bays of windows. These windows are comprised of 5 bays with 3 of the bays being identical in size, with segmental arches and radiating brick voussoirs. The plain window trim and lugged sills are composed of wood. These three bays of windows are. four-over-four, double-hung single pane windows, common for this time period, with very narrow glazing bars. The other two (2), bays contain very narrow semi-circular topped windows, which are two-over-two double-hung with very narrow glazing bars, paired in what was originallyy the central bay of the building. The last bay was removed when the fourth floor of 379-381 George Street was demolished about 1913.

South facade: 

This is a common-wall with 381 George Street, North. Although part of the fourth floor wall is showing, it has had vinyl siding put up during the Bierk renovations due to deterioration of the bricks and mortar joints.

West facade: 

This facade has also been renovated, with no remnants of the original building surviving beyond the two brick wall jams on either side of the modern window and door replacements. This facade is only two storeys in height - gently sloping back on a 2:12 pitch.

Historical description:

This George Street commercial block, was built by James Stevenson and Thomas Bradburn, in 1860 by John Harley Selkirk, a noted architect from Buffalo, New York. It was one of the first brick buildings on George Street. The Bradburn-Stevenson building was completed after the devastating fire of 1860, which destroyed a good portion of the original downtown core. Mr. Bradburn operated a general store in the north half of the building (now 383 George Street North). Mr. Stevenson managed a hardware store in the south half, (now part of 381 George Street). The other section of 381 George Street was originallyy part of Mrs Joseph Dixon's building. The pillars running down the middle of front facade of the structure marks the original wall separating 379 and 381 George Street. Following Mr. Bradburn’s retirement from business in the early 1890's, Robert Fair operated a dry goods store for more than 40 years. Above the main entrance of the Fair Company store was a familiar sign of the Golden Lion (seen in several archival images). In the early 1960s through the 1970s it was the location of the Thomas Bata Shoe store. Later it was the Singer Sewing Machine Company outlet. 383 George Street remained in the Bradburn family until 1998 when it was sold to Canadian artist, Mr. David Bierk(1944-2002) as his studio and the Bierkart gallery. David Bierk was born in Appleton, Minnesota, 1944. He studied at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, California, and the Humboldt State University in Arcata, California, where he completing his Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts. In his early work, he followed the West Coast Pop and Photo Realism School of Art.

In 1972, Bierk moved to Canada, settling in Peterborough, Ontario. He was the founder and former director of Artspace, a multi-disciplinary, artist-run centre for contemporary art in Peterborough. David Bierk became best-known for adopting his California background to typically Canadian subjects, as in Hockey Night in Canada (1973), The Laundromat, A Canadian Interior (1975), and The Cremation of Sam McGee (Canada Post stamp, 1976). His Portrait of Queen Elizabeth (1981) for the Peterborough Memorial Centre, measuring 12' x 8' is believed to be the largest portrait of the Queen in North America. Also of note are his multiple fold paintings, which developed out of his earlier rock series. Bierk's work is generally classified as "Postmodernist". His work is widely represented, among others in The National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa.

269 Edinburgh St

Street Address: 269 Edinburgh St.

Roll Number: 030 040 05800 030 040 05900

PIN Number: 281080116

Short Legal Description: Town Plan Lot 11 S Edinburgh W George AM304

PACAC Application Review Date: February 2004

On Site Evaluation Date: October 26, 2003

Evaluation Category: A

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: February 2004

PACAC Application Approval Date: February 2004

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation:

The house at 269 Edinburgh Street is both architecturally and historically significant. It was constructed, probably in 1847 or 1848, for John Edmison, one of the first settlers in Peterborough, who accompanied Adam Scott on his search for a mill site in 1819. By 1857 it was the home of Mossom Boyd, the noted lumber merchant from Bobcaygeon, although Boyd may well have inhabited it as early as 1851. Sometime in the mid-1870s Boyd leased it to his niece Clementina and her husband, John E. Belcher, who added a wing to the house and made numerous changes to both the exterior and interior of the original house Belcher was Peterborough’s most important architect in the last quarter of the nineteenth century and designed many houses and notable civic and commercial buildings, including the Market Hall, the Morrow Building on George St., St. John’s Church parish hall, the former Carnegie Library, the Pagoda Bridge, and the chapel at Little Lake Cemetery. Many of his downtown commercial buildings have been demolished, including the Bradburn building and Opera House north of the Market Hall, razed for the construction of Peterborough Square.

The house remained in the possession of John Belcher’s descendants until 1987, when it was purchased by the present owner. The house consists of two parts, each architecturally significant in different ways. The original house, constructed of limestone from the quarries in what is now Jackson Park, is an extremely well preserved and imposing example of the vernacular Georgian style, with some changes made by John Belcher. It is very unusual in having a moat around three sides, covered by the veranda. The wing designed by John Belcher is an elaborate and impressive example of the Tudor Revival style. Many interior spaces have architectural interest. The dining room, renovated by Belcher in a style inspired by the noted British designer Charles Eastlake, is unique and exceptionally fine.

Original owner: John Edmison

Architect: Addition by John Belcher

Date of Construction: 847-1848 (estimate), addition ca.1875

Builder: Unknown

Site and setting: 

The house occupies a prominent setting at the top of the hill at the intersection of Stewart and Edinburgh Streets. It is by far the largest house in the area, and its Tudor wing dominates the residential neighbourhood, an eclectic mix of Victorian and early twentieth-century homes. The large lot extends from Bethune to Stewart Streets and occupies most of the northern half of the block bounded by Edinburgh, Stewart, Bethune, and Dublin Streets. It once extended seventy-five feet farther south, perhaps even farther originallyy. The house, which is nearly centered on its north side, was originallyy oriented toward the south, and its main entrance was on the southern façade, which faces the extensive lawn and gardens. The house is now oriented toward Edinburgh Street, and the main entrance is contained in the eastern part of a one-story board-and-batten wing to the west of the Tudor wing. The automobile entrance from Stewart Street replaces the existing but disused drive from Edinburgh Street leading to the front veranda.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated: 

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all façades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

Low-pitched hipped roof; Wide eaves with plain wooden fascia, soffits, simple mouldings and plain frieze, verge boards, decorative blocks and finials; Masonry walls including retaining walls in ‘moat’; Verandah including wooden columns, railings, newels and balusters; Double-leaved French doors with moulded casing and plain lintel (both stone and wood), stained glass transoms above; 6/6, 1/1, leaded glass fixed and casement sash windows, including their transoms; Shingle siding; Faux-timbered, Tudoresque plastered exterior wall finishes; Projecting second storey sills and supporting brackets with carved faces.

Interior elements:

Eastlake inspired interior finishes in the dining room; Dining room fireplace and mantelpiece; Coffered ceiling in dining room; Dining room floor.

Architectural description: 

The Original House constructed in 1847-48 The original two-story house is rectangular, oriented east and west. It has a basement of full height. This is surrounded by a moat on the east, south, and west sides which is covered by the veranda on the east and south. The two-footthick walls are constructed of roughly coursed limestone rubble.

The same stone is used for the moat’s retaining wall. Like most buildings of this period with a vaguely Georgian character, the house has a low-pitched hipped roof. The wide eaves have plain fascias, soffits with a simple inner molding and a plain frieze decorated with a horizontal molding strip slightly less than halfway from the top.

There are single brick chimneys at either end. A string course divides the top two sections of each, and the middle sections contain recessed vertical panels with semi-circular tops. The bottom sections are slightly larger in dimension.

The present chimneys, painted gray, are not original. The wide veranda has a low-pitched roof carried by five wooden columns across the front and three on the east end resting on brick piers behind a screen of sturdy wooden pickets. There are plain fascias and moulded soffits over plain lintels. Between the columns is a simple balustrade with square pickets, except at the southeast corner, where a set of seven steps leads to the ground. The columns, made from single timbers, are square at top and bottom, but between are chamfered to be octagonal. They rest on square plinths and have square moulded capitals.

East facade: original house

There are no windows in the second story. In the northern bay of the first story there is a double-leaved French door with moulded casing and a plain wooden lintel extending well beyond the sides of the opening. A double-paned transom contains designs in stained glass. The doors each contain two panes above a lower panel. A window is centered in the basement wall. It is headed by stone voussoirs, has a lugged wooden sill, and contains 6/6 double-hung sash.

South Facade: 

The three-bay façade contains three windows on the second story, each containing 2/2 double-hung sash, which may have replaced original 6/6 sashes during the renovations carried out by John Belcher. There are moulded wooden casings and lugged wooden sills. Limestone lintels project into the frieze above, and there are stone quoins on the sides. These may also be products of the Belcher renovations.

On the first story the centered entrance door is surrounded by a transom and 1/1 side lights above recessed panels. The door itself contains a single central panel. The entire opening has a moulded wooden casing with a beaded edge.
The left bay contains a triple-leaved French window with a moulded wooden casing, a wooden threshold, and a plain wooden lintel extending well beyond the opening. Each leaf contains two panes. There is a three-light transom containing elaborate stained glass designs. This window may have replaced a two-leaved window during the Belcher renovations. It is possible that the window on the east was originallyy here.

In the right bay there is a double-leaved French window like that on the east façade, but with a heading of stone voussoirs rather than a wooden lintel. This may suggest that this was the original window design and that those with the wooden lintels are of later date.

At the western end of the porch there is a room, known as the “harness room”, with board and batten siding. It has an entrance from the porch and a window to the south with 6/6 sash. On the basement level there is a central door with a double light transom and stone voussoirs. In each of the other bays there are windows with wooden
casings, lugged wooden sills, stone voussoirs, and 6/6 sash. A triangular dormer in the center of the roof marks the end of a cross gable from the Belcher addition to the north. It has a plain fascia, shingle siding, and
contains a modern double-leaved casement window.

West facade: 

On the second story there is a window only in the left bay. It is similar to those on the south façade. There are no windows on the first story. A shed roof protects stairs leading to the moat from the left. In the basement there are a door and a window in the southern bay. Both have stone voussoirs. The window has a lugged wooden sill and contains modern 1/1 sash.

North facade: 

Most of this façade has been obscured by the Belcher addition and by a onestory 1960s addition to its west containing the present street entrance, a study, and a garage. To the east of the addition there is one window on the second story like all the others on that floor except for the fact that it has no quoins and is headed by stone voussoirs rather than a lintel. Below it there can be seen just to the left of the wall of the addition half of an earlier
window opening which is now blocked up with coursed limestone.

There are stone voussoirs and a stone sill. Presumably the window was blocked during the construction of the addition. To the west of the addition, on the second story, the stone voussoirs remain from a window opening now
blocked with coursed limestone. The new entrance obscures the façade of the first story.

The belcher addition: 
This addition or wing extends about twelve feet north from the north façade of the original house and is centered on that facade. It is a two and a half story gable fronted structure with a steep roof and boxed projecting eaves. The vergeboards are edged with molding and decorated with pairs of square blocks and there is a finial at the peak. The ends of the verges are carried on single wooden brackets.

The first story is constructed of coursed limestone rubble. The upper stories are separated from the lower by a projecting wooden sill supported by molding and are faced with stucco, over which false half-timbering has been applied – in verticals and horizontals on the east and west sides, and in an elaborate pattern on the north façade consisting of horizontals, verticals, diagonals, pointed arches, and curved diamond shapes in several levels.

On the east façade a tall exterior red brick chimney rises from the top of the stone first story. It culminates in two sections containing round-arched panels, and it has been carried down to the foundation with a single flue of gray brick.

The present chimney was reconstructed in 1988. There is a small casement window to the left of the chimney on the second story. Below it a modern door has replaced the original window, whose stone lintel and quoined dressings, like those of the second story windows in the original house, are still apparent. There is a modern casement window to the right of the chimney On the west façade of the wing there is only a small casement
on the second floor just north of the wall of the original house.

On the north façade there is a window centered in the first story with a stone sill and containing a modern triple
casement. The second story projects beyond the first and is carried on four stone corbels.

There is coved stucco between the outer pairs, but not over the window. Small grotesque faces decorate the bottoms of the corner boards. On the second story there are two double casements with transoms and projecting wooden sills. Vertical members of the half timbering frame them. Each casement contains a single panel of
leaded glass set in diamond and octagon patterns. On the third story a projecting double casement window with a prominent wooden sill is carried on three wooden brackets. Above it there is a projecting gabled lattice. These windows also contain leaded glass panels.

Interior - Dining Room: 

This room, measuring approximately 15 x 24 feet, occupies the western part of the first floor of the original house, extending from the front to the back of the structure. While the room itself may be original, its decoration is the product of John Belcher’s renovations in the latter part of the 19th century. It is a very fine example of the Eastlake style popular in the 1870s and 1880s.

The only window in the room is on the south wall. It is a triple French window with a triple transom, set in a window embrasure about six feet wide. Each transom contains a fine stained glass design of flowers within a circle within a
square of coloured glass. Each casement contains two panes of glass separated by a horizontal glazing bar.

A fireplace is centered in the west wall. On the east wall double six-paneled doors toward the south lead to the hall, and a single similar door toward the north leads to the service area. High baseboards with moulded tops extend around the room.

In addition to the window, the most significant elements of the room are the paneled ceiling, fireplace mantle and overmantle, and the floor. All wood is pine, the floor left natural and the panelling stained.

Tiles with a pattern of triangles and flowers surround the fireplace, and its heavy frame contains paneled, incised, and turned elements in the Eastlake manner. Brackets support a mantelshelf, above which there is a beveled-glass mirror set into panelling with fluted pilasters on either side. Above this overmantle a deep coved cornice of horizontal boards with vertical ribs extends to the ceiling.

Around the perimeter of the ceiling moulded stained cornices support a paneled frame giving the appearance of an
enclosed beam. The ceiling itself is divided into three transverse sections, divided by deep moulded members. The
central section, extending from the fireplace cornice, contains a square center containing a diamond, all framed by moulded dividers and filled with tongued and grooved boards in diagonal patterns. On either end of this square two sections divided by molding and filled with herringbone boarding extend to the perimeter. There are larger major sections of panelling on either side of this central section, each divided by molding into four divisions with the boards set in diagonal patterns to create a herringbone effect.

The ceiling design is reflected in the floor, although here the square central section is larger than the ends, the reverse of the ceiling. Two board widths mark the floor’s perimeter. Lines of four transverse boards define the square central section. Within the square a diamond is created with pairs of diagonal boards. Except for these and the transverse boards across the ends of the room and those marking the central square, all boards are laid longitudinally.

Pioneer Park (51 Hilliard St)

Street Address: 51 Hilliard St.

Roll Number: 050 090 09100 0000

PIN Number: 281150129

Short Legal Description: Pt. S1/2 Lot 1, Con. E.C.H; Reg.Pl. 45 and Reg. Pl. 45R 626= agreement with

Bible College at SW corner Hilliard and George

PACAC Application Review Date: October, 1999

On Site Evaluation Date: N/A

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Landscape

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: November, 1999

PACAC Application Approval Date: November, 1999

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation:

Pioneer Park was the site of the second Methodist Cemetery in Peterborough. The first Methodist Cemetery (now Confederation Park), was closed by the congregation in 1851. The new Methodist Cemetery at the corner of Hilliard and George was registered in 1855 by the trustees of the Wesleyan Methodist Church. The Cemetery closed in 1875 and it is believed that some remains were transferred to Little Lake Cemetery after the closure. By September 1891, public concerns were being raised about the rapid deterioration of the old cemetery. The City of Peterborough purchased the site from George Street United Church in 1944, on the specific condition that the lands be used in perpetuity, for public park purposes.

CURRENT OWNER City of Peterborough

ORIGINAL OWNER Wesleyan Methodist Church

ARCHITECT: N/A

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION 1851

BUILDER: N/A

HERITAGE EVALUATION CRITERIA NOTE: N/A

Site and setting: 

Located at the corner of George and Hilliard Streets, the three acre, wooded hillside overlooks the Otonabee River at a point which was once replete with water power mills.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated: 

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements: 

All grave markers extant within the confines of the property; The entrance gate complete with any hardware and the grave markers embedded at the base; All geographic and topographical features both natural and human-made; All mature trees and plantings.

Historical description: 

The property known today as Pioneer Park, (southwest corner of Hilliard and George Streets) was acquired for use as a cemetery by the Peterborough Wesleyan Methodist Congregation on November 13, 1850. The first Methodist
Cemetery, (located on the present site of Confederation Park, George and McDonnell Streets) was closed by the congregation in 1851. Remains were re-interred either at the new cemetery or Little Lake Cemetery in the south end of Peterborough. A deed to the new Methodist Cemetery was registered in 1855 and signed by Walter Sheridan,
William Hall, James Stevenson, David Taylor, Charles Hudson, Alfred Wright, Richard Winch, Benjamin Green, Christopher Marshall, John Milburn and John Robinson, as trustees of the Peterborough Congregation of the Wesleyan Methodist Church. The Cemetery closed in 1875 and no additional burial plots were sold. It is believed that some remains were transferred to Little Lake Cemetery after the closure.

By September 1891, public concerns were being raised about the rapid deterioration of the old cemetery and who should take responsibility for its care. The Nichol's Hospital, adjacent to the cemetery, leased the grounds but
deterioration continued.

The City of Peterborough purchased the site from George Street United Church in 1944, on the specific condition that the lands be used in perpetuity, for public park purposes. In 1960 the site was formally vested by the City to the Peterborough Board of Park Management (bylaw 1960-31). In recognition of the site's status as an inactive cemetery, the area was formally dedicated as Pioneer Park on October 12, 1961.

The Parks Board incorporated four of the intact monuments into an entrance to the park. The Board also left one prominent granite monument standing in the middle of the site. City staff removed all other monuments and tombstones visible as of 1961 although other gravestones are extant. Most have either been partially or fully covered by sod for several decades. As recently as 1996 a concerned local citizen discovered a previously buried
cemetery marker for a five year old boy who died in 1873.

In 1972 the City of Peterborough exchanged 0.67 acres from the western end of the park with the Eastern Pentecostal Bible College, in return for 0.76 acres on the south limit of the park. The College agreed to maintain the property as a landscaped open space compatible with Pioneer Park.

An accurate assessment of the number of burials in the cemetery may never be known since a fire in 1896 destroyed the burial records. By the early 1950's however, a list of almost two hundred names had been transcribed from surviving monuments and gravestones. In 1995 the Ontario Ministry of Consumer and Commercial Relations legally designated Pioneer Park as an inactive cemetery under provisions of the Ontario Cemeteries Act.

100 Benson Ave

Street Address: 100 Benson Avenue

Roll Number: 050080185000000

PIN Number: 281160081
Short Legal Description: Blk D, Pl 101, Lt. 14, Lts. 16-18, Pl. 71, Pt. 1, ECR, Pt 1, RR, 45R1146

Name of Owner(s): Kawartha Pine Ridge District Public School Board

Designation Application Note: Heritage designation included as condition of rezoning by Planning Division.

PACAC Application Review Date: October 2002

On-Site Evaluation Date: January 2003.

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Heritage – buildings

Built Heritage - interiors

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act - Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: February 2003.

PACAC Application Approval Date: March 2003.

Short statement of the reasons of the designation: 

The Peterborough Normal School and surrounding grounds are both architecturally and historically significant. The property is worthy of heritage designation for cultural heritage value or interest pursuant to Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act. Built in 1908 at the height of Peterborough's prosperity, it reflects a time when the city was highly regarded nationally as a major urban centre.

Architecturally the building is significant for its overall design, landmark status and its association with an architect of provincial renown, F.R. Heakes. The former Peterborough Normal School (later renamed Peterborough Teachers'
College) is the largest surviving example of turn-of-the-century Beaux Arts or CityBeautiful architecture in the City of Peterborough. Other local examples include: King George Public School, the old Carnegie Library, the former De Laval administrative building on Park Street South, Hunter Street Bridge and King Edward Public School.

It is also one of only three remaining provincial Normal Schools. The North Bay facility has been converted into a correctional facility and the Stratford building is now a museum. Another normal school built in Hamilton was demolished. 

General Heritage Attributes Included in Designation: excellent example of Edwardian Classicism and City Beautiful architectural detailing; prominent landmark standing three storeys high, with a raised basement storey; 'Category A' classification under PACAC heritage evaluation criteria; prominent entablature on central pavilion including a wide, coffered cornice ornamented with modillions, dentils and metal architrave; all column and pilaster capitals, along with other neo-classical details; all window openings, as now sized, including decorative cast stone heads with
keystones over windows and door openings, flat lintels on basement windows and cast stone window sills; red brick walls including parapets; all decorative brick detailing including quoins, pilasters, round brick columns, continuous plain parapet, etc; all wood sash and metal frame windows; all decorative metalwork including the parapet caps, decorative architrave mouldings, cornice mouldings and entry overhangs, etc.; all columns and pilasters including capitals and architrave ornamentation above entries; all ornamental cast stonework over vestibule entries; cast stone string-course below second floor windows; large transoms above existing and blinded entries; property is distinguished by several mature shade trees (maple) and cedar hedges, cement pedestal erected for a sundial (now missing) on the front lawn (near the south-west corner of lot).

West facade: 

hemispherical, ribbed metal dome (silver painted) supported by a round brick tower and highlighted by two painted metal frieze bands; the upper one decorated with gilded lions heads; a pavilion rising through the two upper stories with two round brick columns and Doric capitals (cast with egg and dart motif); square half columns behind them; columns support a very prominent segmental pediment (with returns); pediment is decorated on its underside with narrow rectangular panels. a large, arched window with two vertical panes (topped with dentil moulding) and a semi-circular top pane with wooden muntin bars forming a fan shape; cast stone, decorated with a giant keystone, two cast-stone roundels imbedded into the brick wall, decorative wrought-iron railing extending between the columns at base of the window; string course of cast stone running below the second storey windows; two round stone columns topped with Corinthian capitals, supporting a flat hooded canopy, (marks opening into brick vestibule); canopy is supported by two large, ornately decorated brackets (decorated with papyrus motif ); brick vestibule with a prominent, semicircular cast-stone arch above stairs, supported by brick pilasters with Doric cast-stone capitals; tongue-in-groove stained wood ceiling; original concrete floor; massive double-leaved oak door accented with a series of square panels, side lights and transom leading into the building from the porch (doorway is decorated with a straight head with keystone and alternating voussoirs);

South facade: 

brick vestibule used or the side entrance, also with cornice decorated with dentils; concrete staircase; heavy oak door with a series of square panels, side lights and transom leading into the building (doorway is decorated with a straight head with keystone and alternating voussoirs);

Interior elements: 

all pressed metal ceiling elements throughout the building including third floor auditorium, but excluding the ceilings in the basement level. wooden staircases and related detailing on south and west sections of building; all columns and capitals in third floor auditorium; interior finishes and related detailing including wooden door and window surrounds, chair-rails and baseboards throughout building should be retained and if required to be removed, should be reused, as much as possible, in interior renovations.

ARCHITECT: Francis R. Heakes

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1907-1908 (actual)

Site and setting: 

With its elevated site above Dixon Park, the former Peterborough Normal School (later renamed Peterborough Teachers' College) is an impressive institutional structure. The building is a tremendously important landmark. The silver coloured dome is visible throughout most of the City. It is also the most important architectural feature of a generally well-preserved Edwardian neighbourhood in the north end of the City. The grounds contain several distinguishing landscaping elements including: mature shade trees (maple) that surround the building, cedar hedges and a cement pedestal erected for a sundial (now missing) on the front lawn (near the south-west corner of lot).

Heritage evaluation criteria note: 

The Peterborough Normal School/Teachers College ranks as a "Category A" structure under PACAC's heritage designation criteria. Category A buildings are: "individually outstanding and have the broadest heritage significance in the City by virtue of architectural, historical, and environmental criteria along with overall integrity of design and construction. "Category A" properties generally hold provincial and/or national significance".

Architectural description: 

Peterborough Normal School is a rectangular building constructed of unpainted red brick. It stands three stories high above a raised basement storey, resting on a course of rock-faced limestone serving as a continuous sill for the basement windows.

The corners of the first floor have brick quoins. The corners of the upper two storeys have brick pilasters with plain, cast stone Doric capitals above them. A string course of cast stone runs below the second storey windows, serving as a continuous sill.

Above the third storey windows and the capitals of the pilasters, there is a continuous painted metal crown molding. Above that again is a prominent architrave surmounted by a wide bracketed cornice (with modillion brackets) and frieze of painted metal and a plain brick parapet capped with a painted metal molding.

The windows on the upper three stories have alternating voussoirs of cast stone over them. On the first and third stories are cast-stone lugged sills. Original wooden, one-over-one hung sash windows remain only in the basement level and on the third storey. Replacement windows, (with a sash configuration), are found throughout the main building. These windows were installed during the occupancy of the Kawartha Pine Ridge Public School Board. Archival images confirm that these replacement sash windows (particularly those on the third storey) are similar in composition and appearance to the original wooden sash windows installed during the 1907-1908 construction.

The basement window heads consist of heavy rock-faced limestone lintels. The main west facade (facing Benson Avenue) is five bays wide. The wide projecting center bay extends farther out on the first floor, where every sixth brick course is recessed, echoing the quoining at the corners of the building.

The first floor projection forms the base for a pavilion rising through the two upper stories. Two round brick columns, with square half columns behind them, support a very prominent segmental pediment (with returns). This pediment is decorated on its underside with narrow rectangular panels. The capitals topping the round brick columns are decorated with a cast egg-and-dart motif.

In the center of the bay is a large, original arched window with two vertical panes (topped with dentil moulding) and a semicircular top pane with wooden muntin bars, forming a fan design. The semicircular window head is cast stone and decorated with a giant keystone. On either side of the head are cast-stone roundels. A decorative wrought-iron railing extends between the columns.

Above the main Benson Avenue facade is a hemispherical metal dome supported by a round brick tower with two, narrow metal frieze bands. The upper frieze is decorated with gilded lions' heads.

To the right of the center bay on the first floor is a brick vestibule porch under a semicircular cast-stone arch supported by brick pilasters with Doric cast-stone capitals. The arch is decorated with three large keystones. Two round painted stone columns with Corinthian capitals support a projecting flat hooded canopy on two large brackets decorated with papyrus leaves. The canopy is paneled on its underside. The canopy marks the position of the main entrance to the building via the brick vestibule. The ceiling inside the vestibule is clad in tongue-and-groove stained wood. The vestibule floor still retains an original cement base.

A massive double-leaved oak door accented with a series of square panels, side lights and transom leads into the building from the vestibule. The doorway is surmounted by a straight head with alternating voussoirs. To the left of the center bay on the first floor are two windows, and there are two on each side on the second and third stories.

The north facade (facing Dixon Park) is divided into three equal sections, each consisting of four bays on each storey. The center section is recessed. At the rear of the front section there is a one-storey ell decorated with a dentillated cornice.

A concrete staircase has survived and leads to a blocked-up vestibule, now with a small window, still topped with its original decorative voussoir. The stairs once led to the north entrance doorway. originallyy the north facade parapet (at the roofline) was an open balustrade with turned, wooden balusters. Presumably a similar wooden balustrade would have been found at the south facade. Although building owners are absolutely not obligated to restore lost
architectural elements, the restoration of the lost balustrades is strongly encouraged.

King George Public School in Ashburnham has an intact roofline balustrade that is virtually identical to what once existed on the Normal School. The south facade (facing O'Carroll Street) resembles the north, with two projecting sections of four bays each. However, the west section is set back from the front one full bay, allowing for an opening from the porch on that side. The center recessed section is narrower, with paired windows on the second and third stories.

A one-storey brick vestibule for the side entrance, (also with a cornice and dentils), projects out from the center section. A heavy oak door with a series of square panels, side lights and transom leads into the building. The modern addition at the east facade, while executed in a modern style, does not impinge on the historic design of the main block. The architect was careful to subordinate the addition's design to the original structure.

Interior spaces: 

Although the interior of the Normal School have been modified to accommodate the most recent administrative uses of the building, the majority of the vintage interior finishes have survived and are well preserved. They include: the substantial wooden staircase on the west facade, the wooden staircase on the south facade, pressed metal ceilings throughout the building, wainscoting, wooden door and window surrounds, other wooden finishes and the ornate columns and capitals (decorated with papyrus motifs) inside the third storey auditorium.

Historical description: 

Early in 1906, the Ontario government announced plans to construct at least three provincial normal schools (teachers colleges) to provide standardized training of teachers for the public school system. However, locations for the new schools had not been decided upon at the time of the announcement.

Almost immediately, the Peterborough Board of Education, members of City Council and the local Board of Trade embarked on a lobbying effort to ensure that Peterborough would not be overlooked as a prospective location.

Only a year earlier Peterborough was incorporated as a city. Industry was booming, the population was expanding rapidly and large impressive homes were being erected in new subdivisions just west of Park Street. Newspaper headlines, tourism brochures and virtually every piece of commercial literature were bursting with civic pride. No public official wasted an opportunity to expound on Peterborough's many virtues.

In February 1906 a delegation consisting of every member of the local school board and representatives from Council and the other groups, made a trip to Queen's Park to discuss Peterborough's case with the Minister of Education. After the meeting the Minister stated that the delegation made a strong case but he remained non-committal.

The delegations' efforts had not been in vain however. In the summer of 1906, Peterborough was chosen as one of four communities for a new normal school. Hamilton, Stratford and North Bay were the others. The City offered a construction site free of charge in Dixon's Park, located in the North Ward. Other areas considered included: the old Dickson Lumber mill site on the banks of the Otonabee River between London and Murray Streets; the north half of Central School, a site adjacent to the YMCA on Murray Street and the AHilliard Farm@. The Provincial Government would make the final site selection.

After much debate the Board of Education recommended the Dixon Park site which was sufficiently large and an ideal place for a school, away from all noises@ as one Board member observed in the Examiner. The Board also promised to expand the North Ward School (Queen Alexandra School) to 10 rooms to accommodate the training needs of teachers. 

Francis R. Heakes, the Provincial Government Architect, was commissioned to design the new normal schools. The Government requested only one design to be used for all four normal schools. F.R. Heakes is perhaps best known for his 1916 design of the Chateau styled Government House - monumental Toronto landmark (demolished).

Heakes initial designs for normal schools included a large cupola above the main entrance and other ornamental towers. The architect was certainly inspired by fashionable Edwardian classicism and the "City Beautiful Movement@ which encouraged architects to develop monumental, impressive designs that would promote "civic grandeur". The movement was based on the desire to revitalize city life through the creation of monumental buildings and urban parks that fostered civic pride. The Teachers College building represents a time when Peterborough saw itself as participating in a design movement along with great cities like New York, Chicago and Montreal.

In October 1906 construction tenders were received based on Heakes initial design Construction costs were not to exceed $50,000 for each project. Unfortunately every tender that was submitted estimated construction costs to be at least $75,000 per building. Queen's Park declared that "the towers will have to go" according an Examiner headline. Heakes was forced to scale back the ornamental elements somewhat and he also reduced the overall square footage of each building.

In January 1907 the successful construction bid was announced. Fred Whitman, a Brantford building contractor, had submitted the lowest bid of $53,000 per building. Whitman had just completed some major projects for the Ontario Agricultural College in Guelph and a railway station in Brantford. Each Normal School would be identical. They would each be stone and brick clad, with a 78 foot frontage, 4 floors and a single tower with a metal clad dome. The buildings would be equipped with a large gymnasium in the basement, chemistry labs, prep rooms, 5 large classrooms, and a second floor assembly hall that could comfortably accommodate 500 people.

The first project underway was in Hamilton. By the middle of 1908 construction of the Peterborough Normal School was nearing completion in the North Ward. On September 15, 1908, the School was officially opened with an attendance of 159 student-teachers. It's first Principal was Duncan Walker. 

In May 1918 the Governor General, Duke of Devonshire and his wife, made a formal visit to the Peterborough Normal School. His Excellency addressed the student body in the large Assembly Hall and a small reception followed.

The Peterborough Normal School operated continuously until the late 1960s, training several hundred new public teachers. After the Normal School closed, the building was used as the main offices for the Peterborough County Board of Education. In 1998, the Board relocated to a new facility after the amalgamation of the Peterborough and
Northumberland School Boards.

The Normal School in Stratford, Ontario (designated under the Heritage Act in 2002) was recently restored as the new home of the Stratford-Perth Museum. The school in North Bay (protected by a cultural heritage protocol agreement through the provincial government) was altered significantly when it was converted into a correctional facility.

The structure retains virtually all of its vintage architectural detailing with the exception of most one-over-one wooden sash windows (replaced some years ago), roofline balustrades and some entrances.

399 Parkhill Rd W

Roll Number: 151403002005800

Pin Number: 280870018

Short Legal Description: PLAN 39 PT LOT 21 RP 45R9997 PARTS 1 & 2 AM304

Name of Owner(s): Steele, Marcia Florence

Owners Concurrence: Yes

Designation Application Note: Heritage designation requested by owner PACAC application review date: November 12th, 2002

On-Site Evaluation Date: October 11th, 2002

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Heritage - buildings

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act - Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: June 2003

Designation Brief Completed By: Michelle Townsend PACAC Application

Approval Date: August 2003

Date Submitted to City Clerk: September 2003

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

The McFadden House, constructed in 1859, is an excellent example of the Ontario Gothic style as it developed in the Peterborough area. The structure was owned and built by James McFadden, a prominent Irish immigrant and businessman in the City. The house is significant for its retention of original materials and millwork- shiplap siding, windows, and porch elements- as well as its unusual easterly orientation perpendicular to the street.

Architect: Unknown

Date of Construction: 1859-1860

Site and setting: 

The McFadden House is situated in the area of Donegal Street to the east and Park Street to the west. The house is set on the south side of Parkhill Road. At the time of construction, Parkhill Road was known as Smith Street and was the northern boundary between the City of Peterborough and Smith Township. The house is unusual due to its orientation on the street the front facade of the house is oriented to the east, instead of north to face the road, due to the fact that James McFadden owned the property right over to Donegal Street( see map}.

The property at 399 Parkhill Road originallyy ran east to Donegal Street and incorporated lots 20 and 21. According to the chain of title, the original grant to James McFadden was for AIl 3/5, acre. In 1875, James McFadden severed the "west part with front of H4ft. On Smith St. U for U$1.00 to Martin McFadden." On the east portion of the original grant land, James built a two storey, two bay red brick house in the late 1880's. This house is also still in existence, and is now known by the municipal addressing system as 391 Parkhill Road.

This area of Peterborough is residential, and contains buildings dating from the mid-to late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated: 

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Good example of Ontario Gothic style of architecture;

Building conspicuous due to its eastern orientation (not oriented to the north and the main street); Category B classification under PACAC heritage evaluation criteria; Rectangular wood frame with shiplap siding and medium pitched gables either side of the structure; Three bay front facade with center entrance on the first storey, with a peaked gable and window above it on the second storey; Original squared-topped, double-hung windows, 6/6 on main floor, 6/1 on second storey, and 311 double-hung square-topped sash window in tl1& upper gable; Original main door with small panned transom window; Original chimney on north end of building; Front porch with original soffits and fascia, with tongue and groove design on porch ceiling;

Architectural description: 

The McFadden House presents a typical example of the Ontario Gothic Style as influenced vernacular architecture in the Peterborough area. The house is rectangular in shape with a setback kitchen ell on the south end. Both the ell and the main blaock are clad in shiplap siding. The main house features a medium pitched gable roof. The structure is unusually sited facing east, perpendicular to the street.

The three bay front facade has a center entrance with a steeply peaked wall dormer breaking the eaves line above. A multi light transom is located above the original door although it has been covered over with plywood. The main wood door, has. plain surround sides with a architrave type of plain with embrasure. The door itself is a recessed three panel on the lower half, and a single pane window in the upper half of it.

The walls on either side of the entrance are broken in the center by square topped, 6/6 double hung sash wood windows, with plain sides and a lug-sill. The window in the dormer centered above the door appears to be a 6/6, but is hard to tell because of an air conditioner has been installed in it, and it is also protected with a storm window.

The north facade is two bays with windows balanced on the wall with equal distances spaced between them vertically. The lower windows of the north facing gable end are the same as those flanking the front door, being 6/6 double hung sash wood with lug sills and being the same size, the upper floor windows are slightly smaller but are still 6/6 double hung sash wood windows with lug-sills. On the south facade of the main structure is two bay with the windows being on the upper floor level looking to the street the window on the right is a double sash with a mullion between, each window is a 1/4-3/4 below, 3/1 double hung wood sash windows, with lug-sills. The window to the left has been replaced at some time.

The attached structure on the south facade is set back by about 3 feet from the main front facade, and is a two bay shiplap structure. The window is the same as the main floor windows of the main building, the door is also original On the south facade of this part you can see the where another structure had been attached at some time therefore matching

Goad's Fire Insurance map.

The chimney on the north end of the structure is original, as are the soffits and fascia on the front porch. The porch and porch ceiling features a tongue and groove design and are new within the last couple of years, and are sensitive to the original house in style.

Historical significance: 

The McFadden House is an excellent example of the Simple Ontario Gothic Style, and is typical of architecture dating-to the-third quarter of the nineteenth century. The structure dates from an early period in the City's history, and has been owned by only three families since its construction. James McFadden built the house in the late 1850's or early 1860's. and it was assessed at $670.00 at the time of its construction. The-house is currently being restored, and still retains its original windows, doors, northern chimney, and shiplap siding.

Historical background: 

James McFadden, an Irish immigrant, arrived in Peterborough in 1849 with Martin McFadden. A prominent Peterborough family, the McFadden's operated a funeral parlour, casket and furniture business at 186 Hunter Street. James McFadden received the- crown patent for the land in July of 1854. According to the Fleming map of 1845, this block of land had originallyy been set aside as burial grounds for a cemetery. McFadden built a shanty on the land, which was replaced by a house ca. 1859-1860. James lived in this house until 1875, when he built another home at what is now 391 Parkhill Road.

In November 1875, Martin McFadden is listed as the owner of 399 Parkhill Road. The McFadden family occupied the house until about 1895, at which point the home was tented to various employees of the furniture and funeral business, McFadden & Sons.

From 1922 to 1925 J. Gerald McFadden lived on the property, and when J. G. McFadden moved to 391 Parkhill, the house was once again rented to employees. The house was sold to Vernon Ferguson on December 22nd, 1941 by Rev. Victor G. and Gertrude McFadden, who were executors of the will of J. G. McFadden. The house at 399 Parkhill
Road remained in the Ferguson family until 29th October, 1993, when it was sold to the present owner, Marcia Steel, by Wayne Ferguson.

The 1875 Bird's Eye View of Peterborough Map shows this house as a 1 storey dwelling with a verandah across the eastern facade. Goad's Fire Insurance Map of 1915/1925 also shows four shed roofed additions to the structure, running straight down from the South Facade. Examination of the present building you can see where these additions were attached to the kitchen wing, with the siding being of a smaller size, where they had been attached.

751 George St N

Roll Number: 050010114000000

PIN Number: 281140103

Short Legal Description: PT LT 10 PL 18 PT 2 PL 45R12922,

S/T ROW OVER PT 2 PL 45R12922 AS IN LT123117 AND PT LT 10 & PT OF UNNAMED ST PL 18 PT 6 PL 45R12922; PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: January 6, 2005

On Site Evaluation Date: September 29, 2004

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 10, 2005

PACAC Application Approval Date: January 11, 2005

Submission Date: January 24, 2005

Short statement of reacons for heritage designation: 

Sadleir House, formerly known as the James Kendry Mansion, and the ‘Castle’ has both architectural and historical significance. A large and elaborate Queen Anne style building on George Street North, it was constructed in 1892 by builder J.C. Rutherford for his brother-in-law, James Kendry, an industrialist and well known 19th century Peterborough politician. The building is strongly connected to several other prominent citizens of Peterborough’s past; James R. Stratton, owner/publisher of the Peterborough Examiner and MPP, and Richard Sheehy, a noted contractor. All three families played principal roles in the industrial, commercial and political development of Peterborough. In 1963 the building was sold to Trent University and became the principal building of the Peter Robinson College.

A three-story building with irregular massing, Sadleir House is comprised of three separate parts, each with distinct architectural value. The original house, with its turret on the northeast corner, is an extremely well preserved example of the ornate Queen Anne Revival style. It is illustrative of an era in Peterborough’s history when industry was flourishing, and wealthy politicians, industrialists and merchants sought physical manifestations of their success and power. This Queen Anne style house was designed to exhibit wealth and optimism through extravagant elements such as towers, contrasting colours, and an assortment of window designs and roof
te structure he built to house them, and made possible by his financial success.

The rear coach house was built by the second owner of the house, James Stratton, to accommodate his hackney horses and carriages. It follows the architectural style of the original structure, and though slightly smaller, has many of the same architectural features of the larger building. The value James Stratton placed on his horses is evident in the elabora

The original house and coach house are connected by a wing designed by noted Canadian architect Ron Thom at the time he was designing the main campus for Trent University. The wing was built in the 1960’s when Sadleir House
became the main building for Trent University’s Peter Robinson College. While sympathetic to the original design of the house, it is a stylistically separate and distinct addition. As such, it is a well-designed example of a harmonious transition between modern and historical architecture. 

ARCHITECT: N/A

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1892

BUILDER: J.C. Rutherford

Heritage evaluation criteria note: 

Category A heritage properties are: "individually outstanding and have the broadest heritage significance in the City by virtue of architectural, historical, and environmental criteria along with overall integrity of design and construction. "Category A" properties generally hold provincial and/or national significance

Site and setting: 

Sadleir House is located on George Street North, with the main entrance facing south. The building was once a part of a larger lot (190’x150’ in 1891) and has since been carved into the considerably smaller property seen today. However, the site still retains a large ‘south lawn’ with mature trees and gardens, which visually enhances the grand character of the house as one approaches from the south. originallyy located at the northern limits of the city, the building is now surrounded on the north, east and south by a residential neighbourhood of late 19th and early 20th century houses of which Sadleir House is the largest and most elaborate structure. To the west of the property lies the Rotary Trail, formerly the old CNR tracks, and a hill, which denotes the western boundary of the Otonabee River Plain.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:

The main building, the coach house, and the 1963 addition linking the two are to be included in the designation. Included in these are many interior and exterior heritage attributes, supporting the reasons for designation. The south lawn is also to be included area.

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all façades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Interios attributes:

All ceilings along with decorative medallions, intricate mouldings and plaster details.

The wainscoting in the library.

All fireplaces, including the main floor fireplace, with large glazed tiles, and cherubs and mythical figures.

The original hand carved wooden staircase with ornamental newel post

Original stained glass windows.

All original hardwood floors with inlay

The Thom auditorium, including the interior trusses and beams

Louvered blinds

Exterior attributes: 

The red brick walls broken by horizontal sandstone bands

The northeast corner turret with its curved windows, sashes and glass, and the fish scale patterned slate shingles used on the bell cast turret roof.

The 1960’s fence

Slate shingled roofs on the house and coach house.

Coursed ashlar-shaped sandstone masonry.

Hipped roof with gabled projections and dormer windows

All original fenestration, windows and glazing

Quarter round corners.

The verandah on the south façade

The tall red brick chimneys

Diamond pattern tiles on the gable pediments.

The 1963 addition connecting the carriage house to the main building

The south lawn, including all built and natural resources such as pathways, mature trees, shrubs and plantings.

136 Maria St

Street Address: 136 Maria Street

Roll Number: 040120166000000

PIN Number: 281380097

Short Legal Description: PT LT 108 PL 1A (Ashburnham), as in R600837; Peterborough

Owner’s Concurrence: Yes

Application PACAC Review Date: January 6, 2005

On-Site Evaluation Date: 27 September 2004

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Heritage

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act, Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 10, 2005

PACAC Application Approval Date: January 11, 2005

Submission Date: January 31, 2005

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

A wood frame cottage built of stacked planks; the Stewart cottage is a fine example of a relatively rare construction method available in Peterborough during its lumber boom of the 1860’s. Since transportation was complicated and costly, only first grade timber was shipped, leaving culled knotted boards for home consumption. For many years, Peterborough produced more board feet of lumber than any other town in Ontario creating a great surplus that could then be used in stacked plank construction; the Malcolm House is another noted Peterborough example. The Stewart Cottage is also significant for its preservation of the original coved shiplap siding and porch elements, as well as neoclassical details such as the window and door surrounds.

The cottage was constructed on land originallyy owned by the Burnham family; it was the only parcel of land to
be severed from the block prior to Revered Burnham’s death in 1877.

Built for Eliza Stewart, possibly a relative of the Reverend’s daughter-inlaw, the cottage was the first dwelling erected on the block. After the house came into possession of the Castle family, the residents for many years were generally employed by the Vermont Marble Company, later the Ontario Marble Company, located across the street. Cut and finished marble debris can be found all over the surrounding area, including at 136 Maria Street.

ARCHITECT: unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1862-1875

BUILDERS / ARTISAN: unknown

Site and setting:

The house currently faces south looking across Rogers Cove Park to the north shore of Little Lake; however, a large marble factory once blocked this view. Set in a residential neighbourhood, many of the houses are set very close to the modern roadway. 136 Maria Street is built along the proper right side of the lot and extends across the front of the lot and set very close to the street. The original wood frame cottage was added onto in the 1890’s, and a small shed is now attached to the rear of the addition. A large tree dominates the small front yard, and the backyard is filled by gardens and wooded bush. The original well along with its pump is preserved in the backyard. The northeast corner of the lot was sold in 1883 for construction of a railroad that is still in existence today.

Description of heritage attributes to be designated:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features.

Exterior Attributes:

The one storey rectangular massing with rear addition

Low gable roof with Neoclassical cornice returns

Original large front wood four pane sash windows and wood shutters, both kept in storage

Original fenestration

Wood frame, stacked plank construction

Original well and hand pump, separated

Verandah with wooden trelliage trim

Coved shiplap siding on the original cottage

Neoclassical window and door surrounds

155 Hunter St E

Street Address: 155 Hunter St. E

Roll Number: 040130137000000

PIN Number: 281360103

Short Legal Description: PT LT4 S OF HUNTER ST E OF ROGERS ST PL 1A (ASHBURNHAM),
PT 2 PL 4512282; PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: January 6, 2005

On Site Evaluation: September 27, 2004.

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 10, 2005

PACAC Application Approval Date: January 11, 2005

Submission Date: January 31, 2005

Short statement of reasons for designation:

Almost a century old, 155 Hunter Street East has substantial architectural value in the integrity of its interior features. originallyy built as a one-family home, the interior of the house has survived intact, with striking features such as plaster ceiling medallions, tiled fireplace, and stained glass windows.

In addition to these visually outstanding elements, details that would have been common to early 20th century homes such as the original pine floors, wainscoting and trim, hardware, and bathroom fixtures have also survived.

These basic elements create a picture of the interior of a middle class family home in the early twentieth century.

The building’s historical significance is also tied to the intact interior elements, which are made all the more exceptional considering the various uses of the house throughout its existence. Built by Gustuvius and Rose Hay in 1907, the house was sold to the Sisters of St. Joseph in 1974 to be used as a boarding facility. It is highly unusual that no partition walls or changes to the interior layout of the building were made at this time. Now used as office space, the interior of the building remains largely the same today as it did in 1907.

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1907

BUILDER: Unknown

Site and setting:

The property is located at the Southeast corner of Hunter and Rogers Streets, nestled at the foot of Armour Hill in Peterborough’s East City. The house is situated toward the northeast corner of the property, with the front elevation facing north. Aesthetically, the North and West facades are mirror images of one another, which presents both Hunter and Rogers Streets with prominent elevations.

Description of heritage attributes to be designated:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features.

Exterior attributes:

The red stretcher bond brickwork, with radiating voussoirs above the windows

The plain boxed cornice with return

All transoms, sidelights and fanlights

Projecting frontispiece and elaborately carved cornice brackets

Original entrance vestibule, including both the single leaf exterior door, and the interior double leafed doors, and the exterior door surround with Neoclassical pilasters

Interior attributes:

Plaster ceiling medallions

Fireplace with wood trim and ornamental tiles

All stained glass windows

The original pine wood floorThe wainscoting and semicircular doorways

The interior and exterior doors with decorated architraves

Hardware and fixtures, including the metal claw-foot bathtub in upper
bathroom

Newel post and wooden balustrade with pendel

Interior double leafed doors and hardware

205 Lisburn St

Street Address: 205 Lisburn Street

Roll Number: 040190031000000

PIN Number: 284660044 

Short Legal Description: PT BLK E 136 PETERBOROUGH AS IN R454717 ; S/T R111245, R526063; PETERBOROUGH

Owner’s Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: January 6, 2005

On-Site Evaluation Date: September 24th, 2004

Evaluation Category: B

Evaluators: Sue Schappert

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 8, 2005

PACAC Application Approval Date: January 11, 2005

Submission Date: January 31, 2005

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation:

205 Lisburn Street has strong historical value through its close association with the Auburn Woolen Mills. Built by the company circa 1870, the cottage was home to numerous mill workers into the mid 20th century. Through its connection to the Auburn Woolen Mills, the cottage identifies with a significant historical period in Peterborough, when this area was dominated by industrial complexes in the mid to late 19th century.

205 Lisburn Street has architectural value as a vernacular cottage with details of the Gothic Revival style. The numerous wooden elements, such as the original wood siding (currently hidden underneath vinyl siding) and trim, took advantage of Peterborough’s surplus of lumber and new mechanized woodworking techniques. The simplicity of the structure and minimal ornamentation exemplify a typical worker’s cottage, built by the Mill to provide inexpensive housing for their employees in close proximity to their workplace.

ARCHITECT: unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1870

BUILDER: unknown

Site and setting:

originallyy, the property was part of South Douro; however it was annexed by the City of Peterborough, and is now located in the community of Auburn in Peterborough’s East City. The cottage is situated in the center of the lot, with the front elevation facing west towards the Otonabee River and the Rotary Greenway Trail. The Greenway Trail was initially a road, hence the westward orientation of the cottage and its two neighbouring properties.

The cottage at 205 Lisburn Street was originallyy referred to as 200 Auburn Street. It is likely that the Greenway Trail was originallyy an extension of Auburn Street, as there is substantial evidence that the house numbers of the worker’s cottages that no longer exist on the west side of the Trail coincided with the numbers on the east side, which further explains why the back of the house faces east towards Lisburn Street. With the growth of introduction of industry in the Peterborough area, the need for a railway resulted in the road becoming a railroad track.

Munks House is similar in style, size and shape to the adjacent homes on Lisburn Street. The lot extends to the north in a sizable lawn, and to the east of the house is a parking lot, church and several other residential buildings.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all façades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior attributes:

The rectangular massing of the building, with front facing wall gable;

Original elements of trim and finial;

Original gothic, twelve panel sash window;

Original clapboard siding underneath vinyl siding;

Interior attributes:

Original Roof structure and beams

Original, exterior window now inside and preserved within the 1920’s addition to the cottage;

285 George St N

Street Address: 285 George St.

Roll Number: 040050193000000

PIN Number: 281020021

Short Legal Description: PT LT 8 BLK E PL 11 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH PTS 2&5, 45R5796; S/T & T/W R477260; PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: January 6, 2005

On Site Evaluation Date: October 13th, 2004

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 10, 2005

PACAC Application Approval Date: January 11, 2005

Short statement of reason for heritage designation:

Built circa 1870, 285 George Street is valued for its architectural integrity and decorative elements. Constructed by John J. Lundy, 285 George Street was once the northern end of a block of buildings that curved around the corner and continued west along King Street.

The mansard roof and decorative elements that were added in the 1880’s remain only on 285 and 285 ½ George Street. The unique cedar shingle pattern and ornate gable
window surround are distinguishing features of this building, along with the corbelled brickwork below the Mansard roof.

The building is significant not only in its unique display of decorative architectural elements, but also because it is the last remaining section of a building block to retain the original detailing. It is also representative of the 19th century commercial streetscape of downtown Peterborough when the area was the focal point of commercial activity in the City. The building also has historical value in its association with John J. Lundy, mayor of Peterborough from 1879 to 1880, for whom the building was originallyy built.

ARCHITECT: unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1870-1875

BUILDER: unknown

Site and setting:

Located in the south end of downtown Peterborough on George Street North, between Sherbrooke and King Streets, the Lundy building was once the northern end of a block of buildings that curved around King Street. The southern corner is now a 5 storey early post-modern commercial building, and although 283 George Street retains its original 3 storey massing, the decorative shingles and gables on the Mansard roof have been replaced with asphalt shingles. 285 and 285 ½ George Street North are the only buildings in the original block to retain architectural integrity, although the bottom halves of the buildings have been renovated and refurbished with modern amenities.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Attributes:

Rectangular massing of the building

Original fenestration of the second storey with segmental arches

The original parapet brick firewall dividing 285 and 285 ½ George Street

Mansard roof with patterned cedar shingles and dentils below the eaves

Decorative cedar gables and trim

Corbelled brick work

379 George St N

Street Address: 379 George St. North

Roll Number: 040050208000000

PIN Number: 281030072

Short Legal Description: 379 George Street, being part of Lot 2, North of Simcoe Street and West of George Street, City of Peterborough, County of Peterborough; and part of Lot 2 South of Hunter Street and West of George Street, City of Peterborough,

County of Peterborough; and part of blocks G & H of Registered Plan 152 as in R512723 T/W R512723.

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: January 6, 2005

On Site Evaluation Date: June 23, 2004

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Heritage

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 10, 2005

PACAC Application Approval Date: January 11, 2005

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation:

379 George has architectural value as a good example of a mid Victorian commercial structure. The building contributes to a grouping of 19th century commercial structures that provide an excellent representation of Peterborough’s downtown core at a time when it served as the hub of commerce in the city. This structure was originallyy two separate buildings, the north portion belonging to the Stevenson-Bradburn building, and the south portion belonging to Margaret Dixon’s building. The buildings were connected by Grafton’s Men’s Store to create a large storefront around 1918.

The Stevenson-Bradburn portion was built by James Stevenson and Thomas Bradburn somewhere between 1857 and 1860. The Dixon portion was built by Mrs. Margaret
Dixon, wife of the late Joseph Dixon, in 1865/6.

The Stevenson-Bradburn portion was originallyy James Stevenson’s hardware store and the Dixon portion was originallyy the Coulter Drug Store.

Historically, 379 George Street North is linked to several of the largest landowners of 19th century Peterborough. The owners of 381 George Street were James Stevenson, Peterborough’s 5th Mayor and MP, and his business partner, Thomas Bradburn, who was the largest individual landowner in Peterborough at the time of his death. The title-holder of the other half of the building, Margaret Dixon, also owned a significant amount of land in the downtown core of Peterborough.

ARCHITECT: John Harley Selkirk

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 381 George – ca. 1857-1860 379 George – 1865/6

BUILDER: David Carlisle

Site and setting:

Located on the main one-way thoroughfare coming into Peterborough from the north, 379 George Street contributes to the 19th century streetscape of downtown Peterborough. Its neighbour to the north is the Fair-Bierk building, prominent for its preservation of its original four stories. 379 George was originallyy two separate buildings; 381 was part of the Stevenson-Bradburn building, and 379 was part of the Dixon block. The two buildings were joined by Grafton’s Men’s Store in order to accommodate a larger storefront. The separation between the two buildings is noticeable in a slight slant in the floor in the interior, and the difference in the colouration of the brick on the exterior. 379 George originallyy had a fourth storey and a decorative cornice line matching the one on 383 George Street – all removed around 1913.

Summary of heritage properties to be designated:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Attributes:

Rectangular massing of the building

Flat roof that slopes to the back of the building

The red brick of the Stevenson-Bradburn portion and buff brick of the Dixon potion, both laid in stretcher bond construction

The original fenestration of both buildings, including 4/4, 2/4 and 2/2 double hung single pane windows, remaining segmental arches, and narrow glazing bars

The window openings with radiating brick voussoirs, set in elongated brick
recesses

464 George St N

Street Address: 464 George St. N

Roll Number: 040100086000000

PIN Number: 281060090

Short Legal Description: PT LT 1 E of GEORGE ST. & S of MURRAY ST. PL 1 TOWN of

PETERBOROUGH as in R506466, S/T & T/W R506466; PETERBOROUGH CITY.

Owner’s Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: January 6, 2005

On Site Evaluation Date: June 24, 2004

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 10, 2005

PACAC Application Approval Date: January 11, 2005

Submission Date: January 31, 2005

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation:

Set just south of Peterborough’s Civic Square, the William Yelland building has both historical and architectural value. The building is historically significant in its connection to William Yelland, a local businessman and politician who built 464 George Street for his blacksmith and carriage business. Yelland was heavily involved in local politics, serving as a councillor for 13 years before being elected as Peterborough’s 15th Mayor in 1896 and again in 1897. As Mayor, Yelland fashioned himself as a representative of the workingman, and his carriage shop was often used as a space for political discussion.

Yelland’s son, Joseph Henry, carried on the carriage business until the advent of the automobile rendered carriages obsolete. Over the years, the building has served a variety of commercial purposes, and survived several fires.

Architecturally, it possesses simple Victorian architectural features such as recessed brick panels, dichromatic brickwork, and wood framed windows. Built to house a carriage/blacksmith shop, the building possesses clean, straightforward lines that echoed the solid working values of its first owner, William Yelland.

464 George Street has value in its representation of a utilitarian 19th century commercial building, and contribution to the heritage character of George Street. It is
representative of a period in Peterborough’s history when the downtown was the centre of commerce, industry and politics, all of which have a historical connection to 464 George Street.

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1880-1890

BUILDER: Unknown

Site and setting:

The building is located on the east side of George Street North between Murray and Brock Streets, just south of the Civic Square and across the road from the YMCA building. The 3-storey building is attached to a convenience store and barbershop to the south. Although buildings similar in height originallyy surrounded the building, it is now features prominently in the streetscape with 1 and 2 storey buildings to the north and south, and is further isolated by a driveway on each side.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features.

Exterior Attributes:

The tall, rectangular massing of the building, with 3 stories at the front of the building, and 2 stories at the rear.

The three distinct foundations of the building

The original fenestration

All wood framed windows with radiating voussoirs set into 2 storey recessed vertical panels

The red and buff brick on the upper two stories

The flat roof

478 Downie St

Street Address: 478 Downie St

Roll Number: Not Yet Assigned

PIN Number: 280880180

Short Legal Description: PT LTS 16 & 17 S OF MURRAY ST & W OF GEORGE ST PL 1 (PETERBOROUGH), PTS 1,2 & 3 PL 45R13000, S/T & T/W EASEMENT PT 2 PL 45R13000, AS IN R652655; PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: January 6, 2005

On Site Evaluation Date: October 8, 2004

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Heritage

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: December 6, 2004

PACAC Application Approval Date: January 11, 2005

Designation Brief Completed by: Chris Greene, Erik Hanson

Submission Date: January 24, 2005

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

While the exact date of construction is unknown, it is possible that the carriage was construction at the same time as the main house on the Hamilton estate. The carriage house has historic value as one component of an assemblage of buildings, which comprised the estate of William Hamilton, who at one time had arguably the most prosperous business in Peterborough. Along with the Hamilton home and the original foundry offices located at the corner of Reid and Murray Streets, the major components of the estate are intact.

The carriage house retains its architectural integrity in construction materials and design. While the main carriage entrance has been filled in, the openings are otherwise intact. The building represents a good example of an estate service structure designed to compliment and enhance the property of a prominent family.

ORIGINAL OWNER: William Hamilton

ARCHITECT: Possibly John Belcher

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: ca. 1880

BUILDER: Unknown

Site and setting:

Located to the west of the Hamilton family home in the northwest corner of the original estate lands, the brick carriage house rests on a stone foundation on a slight rise above the corner of Downie and Murray streets, overlooking Jackson’s Creek and the site of the Hamilton Foundry to the north. With the acquisition of the property by the Separate School Board in the 1970s, the majority of the property was paved to extend the playground for St. Peter’s Primary School located to the south, and to provide parking for the Board offices.

Summary of heritage attributed to be designated: 

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Attributes:

All windows and doors including frames, sills and header courses of brick

Exterior brickwork including all openings as now sized

Wooden eaves including soffits, fascia, cornice mouldings

Dormers on the east, north and west elevations

Slope and design of the roof

Street signage affixed to the structure

Chimney on west elevation

664 George St N

Street Address: 664 George Street North

Roll Number: 040080132000000

Pin Number: 281070100

Short Legal Description: PT LT 1S of Antrim St & E of George St PL 1 Town of Peterborough AS IN R458619, T/W R458619 if any; Peterborough City.

Owner’s Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: January 6, 2005

Site evaluation date: September 29th, 2004

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act- Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 10, 2005

PACAC Application Approval Date: January 11, 2005

 

Submission Date: January 31, 2005

Short statement of reason for heritage designation: 

Built in 1875, 664 George Street North has both historical and contextual value. The house has strong historic value in its association with the Eakins family of Peterborough, who owned the house for over a century, and controlled the future development of their large landholding. The original owner, James Eakins, was an Irish immigrant who worked for the Dickson Lumber Company. His wife, and then his daughters in turn, inherited and occupied the house until 1976.

664 George Street North has contextual value for its position on the street, as the first structure on the block and in it’s role in the shaping of the streetscape. As the family sold off tracts of their original lot, the Eakins placed a number of restrictions on future developments, such as limiting height to 2 storeys, construction materials had to be brick or brick veneer. New dwellings shared the use of a rear alley, designed to access service areas of the houses; however, the Eakins barred the new owners from constructing stables.

The Eakins were the also the first family on the block to have a driveway from George Street and garage to accommodate the emergence of the motorcar. The 1920’s driveway and garage are representative of the change over in modes of transportation in the early 20th century from horse to automobile. The enclosure on the front verandah also dates to this period, and illustrates the shift away from outdoor living space at the front of the house as the automobile took over the road.

Despite the transformation of transportation from horse to automobile, the new developments on former Eakins land continued to use the rear laneway. The Eakins family also refused to give up 6 feet of their own property and forced the communal back laneway to curve around their property as development of the block continued.

Original Owner: James Eakins

Architect: Unknown

Date of Construction: 1875

Builder: Unknown

Site and setting:

Located on the east side of George Street North, between Edinburgh and Antrim Streets, the Eakins House is set into a 19th century residential neighbourhood. This is one of few houses to have a driveway exit onto George Street. The driveway is located on the north side of the house and leads to a small garage. The lot the house sits on is noticeably larger than the other lots on the block, being 6 ft deeper at the rear of the property, which forces the communal laneway to go around the small cement abutment along the back half of the property.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:

The reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Attributes:

Rectangular massing of the original building and 1920’s addition

Gable roof with Gothic wall dormer and rounded arch window on 1920’s addition

Enclosed front and back porch 1920’s additions

Pink patterned transom window above the front door

Double red brick construction on the front portion of the house

The original remaining elements of the 1920’s garage, including the double leafed entry doors.

Hip roof, and wide eaves with original soffits and fascia

Tall narrow windows, some with segmental arched tops and wooden frames

Two false windows with original shutters

Square posts and trim on front porch

201 Charlotte St

Street Address: 201 Charlotte Street

Roll Number: 040050068000000

PIN Number: 281020010

Short Legal Description: PT LTS 4 & 5 S OF CHARLOTTE ST AND W OF GEORGE ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBO ROUGH AND PT LTS 4 & 5 N OF KING ST AND W OF GEORGE ST PL 1 TOWN OF PE TERBOROUGH, BEING PT 1 PL 45R12968 ; PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: February 8, 2005

On Site Evaluation Date: July 5,2004

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Heritage

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 2005

PACAC Application Approval Date: February 8, 2005

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation 

The former Post Office at 201 Charlotte Street is exceptional for its architectural and historical value. Called “the most modern post office in Canada” at the time of its construction, the building is representative of contemporary
innovation in both architecture and technology. Designed to replace the old Post Office at Hunter and Water
Streets, plans for the new federal building began as early as 1914, but were postponed twice by the two
World Wars. Construction finally began on the new building in 1952. The grand opening of the new Post Office on
June 27, 1955 was attended by the Hon. Robert Winters, Minister of Public Works, and the Deputy Post Master General, W.J. Turnbull.

201 Charlotte Street has significant architectural value as an excellent example of the Modern style. Constructed in the mid 1950’s, the new federal building was designed to make use of new building techniques such as curtain walls in order to create long bands of horizontal windows that span the building’s exterior.

The former federal building has excellent historical value as a representative of both the changing faces of technology, and the increasing public demand for new technology.

The new facility was provided with top of the line equipment, including a high tech sorting machine imported from Holland, the Transorma, which was the first of its kind in Canada, and capable of sorting 15,000 pieces of mail per hour.

The federal building was also outfitted with state-of-the-art closed circuit TV cameras to monitor employees anywhere in the building. The addition of the “snorkel”, a drive-through mail slot, was another ‘first’ in Canada.

ARCHITECT: Craig, Zeidler and Strong

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1952-1955

BUILDER: M. Sullivan & Sons, Arnprior

Context site and setting: 

The former Post Office building is located on Charlotte Street, one of the busier east-west running streets in Peterborough’s downtown core. Facing north towards the street, the building is surrounded by commercial structures and parking lots. The building is a dominant feature on Charlotte Street, with low rectangular massing.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated: 

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Attributes:

The low, rectangular massing of the building, with curtain wall construction

The flat roof

The curtain wall concrete and reinforced steel construction clad in limestone

The continuous horizontal bands of windows on the curtain wall
construction

The main entrance, including pink granite and stone vestibule, ‘Post Office’ letters, and steel frame glazing

The coat of arms on the west facade

Interior Attributes:

The interior finishes of the stair wells and railings, including windows and
glass within stair wells

273 Hunter St W

Street Address: 273 Hunter Street West

Roll Number: 030070022000000

PIN Number: 281040026

Short Legal Description: PT LT 11 W/S GEORGE ST & S/S HUNTER ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH AS IN R312272, S/T & T/W R312272; PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: February 8, 2005

On Site Evaluation Date: August 25, 2004

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Heritage

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 2005

PACAC Application Approval Date: February 8, 2005

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation:

The historical value of 273 Hunter Street West is as one of the oldest remaining stone houses in Peterborough. Built in 1848 by Thomas Eastland, the house also has a remarkable history of occupants and visitors.

The house has strong ties to the early banks of Peterborough, as the residence for the local managers of the Bank of Montreal and Ontario Bank. It stands as an example of a period when employers were expected to provide for their top employees. This trend was discontinued in 1931, when the manager residing in the house, E.S. Martin, was allowed to buy the house upon his retirement.

The house at 273 Hunter Street West also has historical value in its local notoriety as ‘the Winston Churchill House’. During Churchill’s North American tour of 1900/01, the future British Prime Minister stayed at the house of Mr. and Mrs. H.J. Grasette after his Peterborough address on January 1, 1901.

273 Hunter Street West also has strong architectural value. Constructed with stone from the local quarry, the house is an excellent example of the Neoclassical style with its symmetrical façade and large windows. The elliptical transom and sidelights, and square post verandah are also noteworthy Neo-classical details.

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1848

BUILDER: Unknown

Site and setting:

Located in a 19th century residential neighbourhood west of the downtown core, the Eastland House is situated on a corner lot at Hunter and Stewart Streets. Set back from the street with a semi-circular drive, the property is surrounded by a wrought iron fence. The neighbouring properties to the east and south are both 19th century row houses; to the north and east are also multiple unit family dwellings. Mature trees and plantings are scattered throughout the area.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Attributes:

Two storey rectangular massing and three bay façade

Low hip roof

Locally quarried stonework of the main body with projecting quoins

Original fenestration and shutters

2/2 windows

Sidelights and elliptical transom

Labels, quoins and keystones surrounding the 1st storey fenestration and doors

Segmented lintels and keystones above the 2nd storey fenestration

Verandah with square posts

396 Downie St

Street Address: 396 Downie Street

Roll Number: 030070129000000

PIN Number: 280890045

Short Legal Description: PT LT 17 S OF HUNTER & W OF GEORGE ST PL 1 PETERBOROUGH AS IN R653843; PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: February 8, 2005

On Site Evaluation Date: October 6, 2004

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Heritage

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 2005

PACAC Application Approval Date: February 8, 2005

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation:

Built circa 1901, 396 Downie Street has historical value as an excellent example of the large and elaborate homes occupied by Peterborough’s wealthier public servants and merchants. The house was constructed for H.C.
Rogers, the City of Peterborough’s Postmaster, who only occupied the home for 2 years. In 1903 the building was sold to William Conway, who was the manager of the prosperous Grafton & Co. clothing store located at 379 George Street.

Conway and his family lived in the house for more than 20 years.
The house also has strong historical value in its connection to one of the educational leaders of Peterborough. In the late 1920’s Henry R.H. Kenner bought the house, then principal of Peterborough Collegiate Vocational Institute. Kenner retired in 1943, after 50 years as the principal of PCVS, and was later awarded an honorary PhD from the University of Toronto. In 1952, the new secondary school in Peterborough was named Kenner Collegiate Institute in honor of his dedicated service.

396 Downie Street has architectural value as an excellent representation of the Queen Anne style, with its large, irregular but balanced, massing and halftimbered gables. The 1920’s wrap-around verandah features composite columns and brackets under the verandah roof. These hallmarks of the Queen Anne style make 396 Downie Street a strong example of a manner of architecture that was commonly used by the prosperous classes.

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1900-1901

BUILDER: Unknown

Site and setting:

Set in a residential neighbourhood of late 19th and early 20th century houses, 396 Downie Street is set back from the street on a small hilltop. Surrounded by mature trees and gardens, the house towers over the Regency cottage to the south, but is similar in style and massing to the house to the north. Just a block away from the Bishop’s Palace and St. Peter’s Cathedral and Rectory, 396 Downie Street is located west of the downtown core.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated: 

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Attributes: 

Irregular massing of the 2 ½ storey building

Red brick walls resting on stone foundation

Double stack chimneys

Original fenestration, including the oriel window on the second storey of the front façade

Original windows, including all stained glass, and transoms

Beaux Arts style verandah with composite columns, brackets, and ‘V’ groove ceiling

Original soffits and fascia

Double leafed entry doors

The rear basement entryway, including doors, and12 pane fixed window, with 8 pane triangular window above.

407-409 George St N

Street Address: 407-409 George Street North

Roll Number: 040060046000000

PIN Number: 281030032

Short Legal Description: PT LT 1 N OF HUNTER ST AND W OF GEORGE ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH AS IN R170918 EXCEPT THE EASEMENT THEREIN; PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: February 8, 2005

On Site Evaluation Date: June 28, 2004

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Heritage

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 2005

PACAC Application Approval Date: February 8, 2005

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

Built in 1867 by George A. Cox, 407-409 George Street North has contextual significance as a contributor to the 19th century fabric of the downtown streetscape. The building continues the facades of three-storey structures of 19th looking north on George Street.

407-409 George Street North has architectural value in its excellent representation of a 19th century commercial building. Details such as the elaborate hood moulding surrounding the 2nd and 3rd storey windows are intrinsic to the heritage character of the building. The building has historical value in its long history of commercial occupants. 407 George Street North has been operating as a billiard hall since the late 1930’s and is currently the home of Pappas Billiards. One of the earliest occupants was Adam Hall’s Stove and Wrought Iron business, which occupied 407 George Street North for over thirty years and was followed by C.M. Moncur Drugs in 1911. 409 George Street North has seen many different occupants including clothing stores, and a staionairy store.

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1867

BUILDER: Unknown

Site and setting:

Located in the north end of downtown Peterborough 407-409 George Street. North fits into the 19th century streetscape to the north, continuing the façade of 3 storey buildings. To the south is a postmodern structure. The building is two blocks south of the City Hall and the civic square, and two
blocks north of Market Hall, in the heart of downtown Peterborough.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated: 

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

3 Storey rectangular massing

Solid brick construction

Original fenestration set in recessed masonay panels

Hood moulding over the windows on the second storey

Label moulding over the windows on the third storey

2/2 windows (including sash, glazing, iron sills, surrounds and voussiors) on the 2nd and 3rd stories and rear of the building

Corbelled brickwork on the third storey

Remaining brackets at the north and south ends of the building

Leaded glass transom above northern storefront

Original configuration of storefront, including apron, glazing and frames at 409 George Street North

Original George street façade storefront cornice line and cast iron details

Ground floor storefronts at rear of building, including cast iron features woodwork and glazing

544 McDonnel St

Street Address: 544 McDonnel Street

Roll Number: 030010106000000

PIN Number: 280860005

Short Legal Description: PT LTS 15, 16, 21, 22 PL 121; PT CAMBRIDGE ST PL 121 PETERBOROUGH AS CLOSED BY

M38972 AS IN R569033; T/W R327972; PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: June 14, 2005

On Site Evaluation Date: May 31, 2005

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: June 3 2005

PACAC Application Approval Date: June 14 2005

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

Built in 1920 to serve as office and administration space for the Bonner Worth Mill properties, it is the architecturally most intact building of the remaining mill complex. As part of the extant Bonner Worth Mill buildings, it has important connections to labour, political and industrial history, as well as excellent architectural value.

The Bonner Worth Mill properties were the site of one of Peterborough’s most violent labour disputes, which itself had provincial and national repercussions. Labour organization began in Peterborough at both Bonner Worth and Auburn Woolen Mills, and the strike of 1937 was the first of its kind in Peterborough leading to violent confrontations and division within the community.

Within the context of Ontario labour history, the Peterborough strike of 1937 resulted in an inquest into wages and working conditions, ordered by Premier Mitchell Hepburn. The inquest produced Special Order No. 1, which set
minimum wages for men and women in the textile industries. This was the first legislation of its kind, and made under the provisions of the Minimum Wage Act of 1937.

The strike had political ramifications as well. The day after Peterborough workers returned to work, Premier Hepburn called an early election. Riding on the success in Peterborough, Hepburn condemned the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO), and successfully portrayed them as communist sympathizers. He won a landslide victory over Conservative candidate Earl Rowe.

Within a national context, the involvement of the CIO struck fear into the hearts of Canadian industrialists. Although individuals involved in the Peterborough strike denounced any connection to the organization, both the media and the government played on public fears. Local papers announced the forthcoming involvement of textile workers across the nation, but such support never materialized. Linked with violence and communism, the CIO was viewed with suspicion across Canada.

Examined within the framework of industrial activity in Peterborough, the Bonner Worth Mill properties are a testament to Peterborough’s industrial success. Constructed during the peak of industrial expansion in early twentieth century Peterborough, the Bonner Worth Mills company (later Canadian Woolens, and then Dominion Woolens and Worsteds) flourished and contributed to the overseas war efforts during World War I. The buildings continued to be used for industrial purposes for many years after Dominion Woolens and Worsteds left
Peterborough. 

The building’s architectural value lies in its representation of an intact industrial administrative centre. Located between the two main factory buildings, the administrative building was designed by local architect William Blackwell, one of the most prominent architects in Peterborough history, and founder of Ontario’s longest continually running architectural firm. William Blackwell’s other notable projects within the City include: the YMCA building at George and Murray Streets, and the Nicholl’s Hospital, now demolished. The building is also a good example of the Classical Revival style, as illustrated through the building’s classical cornice and entablature, and pediment door surround with pilasters. The building’s square and symmetrical form, as well as the lunettes over the ground floor French doors are also Classical elements.

ARCHITECT: William Blackwell

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1919-1920

BUILDER: Unknown

Site and setting:

Situated on the north side of McDonnel Street, the Administration building for the Bonner Worth Mills is flanked on the east and west by the original factory buildings. To the south is an early 20th century residential neighbourhood, which includes factory worker housing, and to the southwest is the Peterborough Lawn Bowling Club. Jackson Creek runs through the eastern part of the Bonner Worth Mill property, as defined by the CNR right of way boundary line.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated: 

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

Red and buff coloured brick walls including all detailing: quoins, voussoirs, parapet and keystones

Rubble limestone foundation

Flat roof with elaborate cornice and fascia

Classical entablature consisting of limestone frieze and ornamental metal work

Original fenestration, including 8 over 8, 6 over 6, 2 over 2, French doors, sidelights, hardware, transoms and sills

Wrought iron balconette railings at ground level French doors

Main entrance with two sets of double doors, marble tiled vestibule, exterior light fixtures, pediment and pilasters (including ‘Administration’ letters), exterior transom, interior transom with lead caning and ‘CW’ logo, and hardware

Interior Elements:

Quarter-sawn oak panelling including all window trim, surrounds, sills and original doors

Leaded glazed interior door and flanking windows on ground floor

Coffered ceiling on the ground and upper levels

Run-in-place plaster mouldings on the ground and upper level ceilings

Vault doors on basement, ground and upper levels

Crown moulding and baseboards

Staircase balustrade and balusters connecting all floors

Hardwood flooring underneath carpeting on ground level

Original light fixtures (located in interior of vestibule, and ground level)

Ornamental arch at main entrance hall on ground level

90 Murray St

Street Address: 90 Murray Street

Roll Number: 040100050000000

PIN Number: 284840083

Short Legal Description: LT 3 S OF MCDONNEL ST, E OF WATER ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH; LT 3 N OF

MURRAY ST, E OF WATER ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH; LT 4 S OF MCDONNEL ST, E OF WATER ST
PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH; LT 4 N OF MURRAY ST, E OF WATER ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: June 14th 2005

On Site Evaluation Date: October 2004

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Heritage

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: June 2005

PACAC Application Approval Date: June 14 2005

Submission Date: June 14 2005

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

Central School has distinct heritage significance, illustrated through its strong architectural and historical value.
Within the context of the development of Peterborough’s education system, Central School is extremely important. Built on the site of Peterborough’s first log schoolhouse, Central School, or Union School as it was originallyy named, was built to replace both common and grammar schools in the area. Construction started in 1857, and the new school opened on January 3, 1860. The school soon exceeded its capacity of 400 students, and in 1871, a new school building was built to the west of the original structure to provide additional space.

Over the next two decades, several more schools were built in Peterborough to accommodate for the growing student population. Another classroom addition was built in 1891 on the rear of the original building, as well as a new gymnasium in the mid 1890’s. The two buildings are currently physically linked in yet another (modern) addition.

Central School remains important to the thousands of local students (and their families) who graduated over the years. Included among the alumni is the Right Honourable Lester B. Pearson, Prime Minister of Canada, and Nobel Peace Prize winner. Pearson, who lived in Peterborough while his father was the minister at George Street Methodist Church, graduated from Central School in 1908. Pearson returned to Peterborough for Central School’s 100th Anniversary in 1960.

A dominant feature on the streetscape, Central School remains a good example of the Italianate style, despite past renovations. The projecting frontispiece (that was formerly a tower), wide overhanging eaves, and tall windows are hallmarks of the style, as is the low-hipped roof on the original building. The 1871 addition retains similar features to the original structure, but is not as emphatically Italianate in style.

The Central School building is also among the anchor buildings surrounding Victoria Park; the other buildings include: the Peterborough County Courthouse, St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church and St. John’s Anglican Church and manse.

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1860

BUILDER: Unknown

Site and setting:

Set into the hillside of Murray Street facing south, Central School is surrounded on the north, west and east by 19th century residential housing. Immediately to the south of the building is Victoria Park, which leads to the Peterborough County Courthouse at the top of the hill. Numerous historic buildings are within close proximity to Central School, such as: St. Paul’s Presbyterian, Peterborough City Hall.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated: 

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

Buff coloured brick walls on both original building and 1871 addition, including all decorative brick work (quoins, voussoirs, string courses)

Stone foundation

Projecting frontispiece in the original structure (remaining tower)

Original fenestration, including any remaining glass, sills, frames, hardware, or surrounds

Double stack chimneys on both original and 1871 buildings

All entrances on the original and 1871 buildings

Wide overhanging eaves, fascia and soffits on both buildings

Low hip roof on original building; medium pitch hip roof on 1871 additionvwith gabled dormer windows 

168 Brock St

Street Address: 168 Brock Street

Roll Number: 040060025000000

PIN Number: 281060072

Short Legal Description: PT LT 2 W OF GEORGE ST & N OF BROCK ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH PT 7 45R3889; PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: January 2006

On Site Evaluation Date: June 21/04 Updated Oct 25/05

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 2006

PACAC Application Approval Date: January 2006

Designation Brief Completed by: Susan Schappert, with research by Pierre Bois and Michael Dowbenka

Submission Date: January 2006

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

168 Brock Street has good architectural and historical value. A well-preserved example of the French Second Empire style, the building retains its mansard roof and main entrance. Built circa 1870, the building is a good
representative example of changing trends in local architecture. A number of commercial and luxurious residential buildings in Peterborough were built in the Second Empire style, and earlier buildings were sometimes updated with the ostentatious fittings of the day in order to remain stylistically current in the 1870’s and 1880’s. 168 Brock Street however is a good example of the French Second Empire style as it was interpreted for middle class residential housing. The building, in this context, is rare in the Peterborough area, where middle class housing is dominated by a more restrained Edwardian style characterized by hip or gable roofs.

The historical value of the building lies with its connections to Charles Perry, Mayor of Peterborough, and the first Peterborough MP for the new Canadian House of Commons in 1867. Charles Perry was the cousin of Aylesworth Bowen Perry, Commissioner of the North West Mounted Police during the Red River Rebellion. The Perry family owned the house until 1892, when Charles Perry’s widow sold it to the newly formed YWCA to use as housing for young women.

The YWCA used the property as their headquarters for several years before they moved to larger accommodations on Simcoe Street. In 1925 the second and third floors were transformed into the Brock Apartments. A
variety of tenants and commercial occupants have passed through the building in the past 80 years.

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1870

BUILDER: Unknown

Site and setting:

Located just west of Peterborough’s downtown core, 168 Brock Street is a semidetached building transformed from a private home to office space. Attached on the west is a building of the same height and dimensions, built in 1882 and designed by John Belcher.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:  

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features: 

Exterior Elements:

3 storey brick construction

Mansard roof

Gabled dormers

Brackets and trim

Fascia

Original fenestration, including:

Projecting bay windows on ground floor

2 over 2 sash windows

Side entrance

Main entrance

recessed doorway

Porch connecting bay windows

Trim

1925 Fire escape

402-404 George St N

Street Address: 402-404 George Street North

Roll Number: 040100071000000

PIN Number: 281030048

Short Legal Description: PT LT 1 PL 5 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH; PT LT 2 PL 5 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH AS IN

R229284 (THIRDLY DESCRIBED LANDS); PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: January 2006

On Site Evaluation Date: June 28/04 Re-evaluated Oct 26/05

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 2006

PACAC Application Approval Date: January 2006

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

402-404 George Street North has good architectural and historical value as one of the oldest surviving commercial buildings in downtown Peterborough, anchoring one of the busiest intersections of the commercial district. Host to a variety of commercial and residential tenants over the past 144 years, 402-404 George Street North has retained its architectural integrity. originallyy a 3 storey structure, a mansard roof and cast iron window surrounds were added in the 1880’s in order to keep up with contemporary appearances in the downtown area. Although the roof was removed, the ornate window surrounds remain. The building has a long history of commercial and residential occupants. Sold to the Revered John Gilmour in 1858, the Ormond & Gilmour Drug Store opened soon after, operated by John Gilmour Jr., and his business partner, Charles Ormond, both of whom resided above the store for a period of time. Other notable occupants include the Uptown Silk Shop, which operated in the building for
over 70 years.

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1856

BUILDER: Joseph Spencley

Site and setting:

Anchoring the corner of one of the busiest intersections in downtown Peterborough, 402-404 George Street North continues the 3 storey pattern that dominates the streetscape along both George Street and Hunter Street. The neighbourhood consists largely of three and four storey commercial buildings, the majority of which were constructed in the 19th or early 20th century.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:  

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features: 

Exterior Elements:

3 storey brick structure

Decorative brickwork, including:

String courses below cornice line

Recessed panels

Fenestration, including:

2 over 2 sash windows

1 over 1 sash windows

6 over 6 sash windows

Rear façade fenestration

Window surrounds

Metal hoods

Wood frames

Third storey cornice line

Modillions

Brackets

414-416 George St N

Street Address: 414-416 George Street North

Roll Number: 040100074000000

PIN Number: 281030040

Short Legal Description: LT 6 & PT LTS 5 & 7(PETERBOROUGH) PL 5, PT LT 1 N OF HUNTER ST AND E OF GEORGE

ST(PETERBOROUGH) AS IN R229284 (FIRSTLY & FOURTHLY DESCRIBED LANDS) ; PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: January 2006

On Site Evaluation Date: June 28/04, re-evaluated Oct 25/05

Evaluation Category: B
Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 2006

PACAC Application Approval Date: January 2006

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

Built in 1862 by James T. Henthorne, 414-416 George Street North has good historical and architectural value. It is part of a block that consisted of original wooden frame structures, which were eventually replaced by brick. The building has architectural value as a well-preserved representative example of a nineteenth century commercial building. It continues the facades of 3 storey Victorian structures that dominate this section of the George Street streetscape, and retains historic architectural elements such as fenestration and cornice line.

Historically, the building was divided into commercial storefronts on the lower levels, with residential apartments on the second and third floors for many years. Both 414 and 416 George Street North have seen a variety of tenants and businesses pass through the premises. 414 George was a confectionary shop for over 75 years, owned and operated by Harry Long from 1883 to 1906. In 1907 the business was taken over by Thomas Hooper, who ran an award winning confectionary and catering business until his death in 1961. His successful ‘Palm Room’ was a preferred site for catered banquets and events, and was photographed by the Roy Studio.

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1862

BUILDER: Joseph Spencley

Site and setting:

Located in the heart of downtown Peterborough, in the middle of a block of Victorian commercial buildings, 414-416 George Street North continues the line of 3 storey facades along the one-way thoroughfare heading south.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:  

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features: 

Exterior Elements:

Three storey brick construction

Third storey cornice line

Curved brackets

Dentils

Remaining dentilled masonry above store fronts

Fenestration, including:

2 over 2 sash windows

Rounded tops

Segmental arched tops

Wooden sills, and surrounds

Any remaining cast iron features in store front

544 George St N

Street Address: 544 George Street North

Roll Number: 040090042000000

PIN Number: 281060080

Short Legal Description: PT LT 1 E OF GEORGE ST & S OF LONDON ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH AS IN R273647, T/W R273647; PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: January 2006

On Site Evaluation Date: November 2005

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 2006

PACAC Application Approval Date: January 2006

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

544 George Street North has good historical value, and an interesting architectural history. The house has undergone several massive changes during its life, but retains the original Regency character of the 1860’s. Once covered in roughcast plaster, the building is now clad in wood siding. Built as a single-family home between 1855 and 1860, the house was renovated into a double dwelling in 1912. At this point in time, the windows and entrances of the front facade were re-arranged, and a stacked plank dividing wall was created in the interior of the house.

Restored in 2001, the building now houses a family therapy office (Rees, MacMillan and Associates), and has been converted to once again appear a single unit. A new main entrance, complete with sidelights and transom was built
under the low center gable, the wrap-around verandah replaced and much of the fenestration was re-arranged to
approximate the original appearance, based on another local Regency home, Malone (located in the Auburn
community of East City).

One of the most noteworthy occupants was Dr. Alex Harvey, who practiced in Peterborough from 1855 to 1887, and lived in the house between 1869 and 1884. Dr. Harvey is buried in Little Lake Cemetery, in one of two mausoleums on the site.

During the duplex years, the turnover rate for occupants was high, and the building was occupied largely by tradesmen who worked at some of Peterborough’s best known companies: DeLaval, Quaker Oats, Canadian General Electric, and Brinton Carpet.

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1855-1860

BUILDER: Unknown

Site and setting:

Located just north of the downtown commercial district, 544 George Street North is the first in a long avenue of 19th century housing that continues up George Street. Its immediate neighbour to the south is George Street United Church, whose 20th century addition comes right up to the property line of 544 George. Across the road to the west is a funeral home, and parking lot. The house is set close to the street, and surrounded by mature trees.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:  

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features: 

Exterior Elements:

1 ½ storey stacked plank construction

Summer kitchen attached at the east side of the house

Gable roof with center gable wall dormer

Brick chimneys

Wraparound porch

Foundation

Main entrance

Door

Sidelights and transom

Fenestration

Wooden 6 over 6 sash windows

Outbuilding – 4 Bay Carriage Shed

Coved shiplap siding

Vertical plank double doors

Fenestration and surrounds

385-387 Reid St

Street Address: 385-387 Reid Street

Roll Number: 030070122000000

PIN Number: 280890054

Short Legal Description: PT LT 16 S OF HUNTER ST & W OF GEORGE ST PL 1 PETERBOROUGH AS IN R632692; T/W R632692 ; PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: January 2006

On Site Evaluation Date: November 2005

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 2006

PACAC Application Approval Date: January 2006

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

This buff brick, double detached villa has good historical and architectural value. Built in 1885 for R.H. Green, a grocer, and E.B. Edwards, a barrister, the house is an excellent example of the housing occupied by the upper middle class in the late 19th century. It was designed by noted architect and City engineer John E. Belcher, who created a number of large, elegant houses for Peterborough’s affluent population in the late 19th and early 20th century. Better known for his public and/or commercial buildings, Belcher designed numerous buildings that contribute to Peterborough’s historical fabric, including the Market Hall and Clock Tower, and the Morrow
Building. The house at 385-387 Reid Street was transformed into apartments in the 1960’s, and has had a long succession of occupants. Renovated and restored by the current owner, 385 Reid is now the private home and office
space of William Lett, Architect. 387 Reid remains rental units.

ARCHITECT: John E. Belcher

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1885

BUILDER: A. Rutherford

Site and setting:

Set back from the street, this two storey buff brick double detached home is set in a 19th century neighbourhood. To the east is a street lined with churches, and to the north, south and west are large 19th century houses. Two blocks to the south is the Charlotte Street commercial district.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:  

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features: 

Exterior Elements:

White brick symmetrical exterior

Projecting two-storey bays

Side wings

Decorative brick work

Radiating brick voussoirs

Flat brick voussoirs

Fenestration, including:

15 over 1 sash windows

2 over 2 wood sash windows and storms

Segemental arched tops

Rectangular

Front entrance porch, including

Columns set on ashlar block pillars

Second storey railings

Stairway

Side entrance porches

Wood columns and railings

Decorative wood trim

Entrances

Transom and/or sidelights

Four paneled doors with glass inserts

Low hip roof, including:

Fascia

4 brick double stack chimneys

String courses

544 Harvey St

Street Address: 544 Harvey Street

Roll Number: 040090121000000

PIN Number: 284840060

Short Legal Description: PT LT 3 S OF LONDON ST, E OF WATER ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH; PT LT 3 N OF

MCDONNEL ST, E OF WATER ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH AS IN R517625, S/T & T/W R517625; PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: December 2005

On Site Evaluation Date: November 18, 2004

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: December 2005

PACAC Application Approval Date: December 2005

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

Built in 1870, 544 Harvey Street has good historical and architectural value. Built for the Thomas Gladman, the bookkeeper at the local Adam Hall Stove company, the house was soon sold to the Jamieson family of Peterborough. The Jamieson’s occupied 544 Harvey Street for over thirty years, and by 1904 had expanded their family into the cottage next door. The house is a good example of a home occupied by the 19th century middle management class. Mr. Jamieson worked as a manager at the Peterborough Examiner for many years.

The house has architectural value as a well-preserved example of a vernacular 2 storey home from the late 19th century. It retains many original features including soffits, fascia, and fenestration that were once commonly found on homes of this era throughout the City of Peterborough.

544 Harvey Street also has historical value in the presence of an original wooden outbuilding at the rear of the house, as one of only a few remaining structures of its vintage and type in the City of Peterborough. It serves as a physical reminder of a period in urban history that was dominated by a dependence on the maintenance of livestock in the City. Many 19th century homes in Peterborough demolished their livestock and carriage barns, or replaced them with garages, especially after legislation was passed prohibiting livestock within the City.

While the property preserves an atmosphere of life before the automobile, the reconstruction of the original verandah in the 1920’s (half of which was enclosed into a sunroom), reflects the emergence of the automobile as a dominant part of the neighbourhood environment.

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1870

BUILDER: Unknown

Site and setting:

Located just blocks away from Peterborough’s downtown core, 544 Harvey Street is located in the Dickson Mills neighbourhood. The neighbourhood emerged as the Dickson Mill set up on the banks of the Otonabee River. Set in area of late 19th century houses, the Jamieson House fits into the heritage character of the streetscape, which provides a variety of brick, and frame 1 or 2 storey houses.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:  

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features: 

Exterior Elements:

Brick walls

Stone foundation

Main entrance, including 6 pane wooden door, sidelights and trim

Original and 1920’s fenestration, including all 2 over 2, 6 over 6, rear casement window, French doors, transoms, hardware, shutters, sills and surrounds

Hip roof, with gable end on the rear projection, including soffits

1920’s porch with Craftsmen style columns resting on ashlar blocks and enclosed sun room with 3 over 1 windows

Wooden outbuilding, including entrance, fenestration, gabled roof

Summer kitchen addition, including windows, wooden siding, ro

527 Parkhill Rd W

Street Address: 527 Parkhill Road

Roll Number: 030010021000000

PIN Number: 280860096

Short Legal Description: Pt. Park Lot 20, In Twp LT 13, Con. 13 N. Monaghan Part 2 45 R 4714: PTBO Note: The designation applies to 527 Parkhill Road West ONLY (not 525 Parkhill Road West)

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: May 5, 2006

On Site Evaluation Date: September 27, 2004

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: April 2006

PACAC Application Approval Date: May 9, 2006

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

527 Parkhill Road West has good cultural heritage value. A semi-detached residential dwelling that was built to appear as a single-family home, 527 Parkhill Road West has a foundation that appears much older than the rest of the house. The original foundation may have a connection to the Grand Trunk Railway, as the PeterboroughLindsay railway line was laid just to the west of the house in the Jackson Park ravine.

The house as it stands today is a well-preserved example of the Arts and Crafts style, both inside and out. The house retains exterior features such as the steep bell cast roof, and Craftsman columns on the front porch. However, 527 Parkhill Road is especially significant for the interior of the house, which has many well-preserved features, including Art Nouveau light fixtures, staircase, and sunroom paneled with cedar.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Unknown

ARCHITECT: Unknown 3

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: Foundation circa 1885 House circa 1915-1920

BUILDER: Unknown

Site and setting:

Located on the south side of the street, 527 Parkhill Road West is set back from the road across from Fairbairn Street at the intersection. Mature trees surround the property. To the west of the property is a ravine in Jackson’s Park, part of which originallyy belonged to the property. The lot extends back to the south in gardens and treed areas.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:  

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features: 

Exterior Elements:

Steep bell cast roof, with exposed roof beams and rafter ends and dormer window

Stone foundation

1 storey projecting bay window on west facade

Porch with ashlar blocks and Craftsman columns, soffits, fascia and roof with front center gable

Exterior front door with fanlight window

Fenestration, including 3 over 1, stained glass, glazing, wooden sashes, frames and sills.

The old well in the backyard

Interior Elements:

Decorative lighting fixtures and sconces

Built-in curio cabinet in dining room

Original ceiling molds, stucco ceiling with circular medallions

Refinished staircase

All circa 1915 interior doors, including original glass and decorative engravings that match the original front exterior door.

The cedar paneled room at the back of the house

The cistern in the basement

Interior dividing brick wall, visible in basement

548 Aylmer St N

Street Address: 548 Aylmer Street North

Roll Number: 040061091000000

PIN Number: 281060005

Short Legal Description: PT LT 6 W OF GEORGE ST & S OF LONDON ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH; PT LT 7 W OF GEORGE ST & S OF LONDON ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH AS INR1 86579 S/T DEBTS IN R186579; PT

LT 6 W OF GEORGE & N OF MCDONNEL ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH AS IN R200579 & R2153

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: May 5, 2006

On Site Evaluation Date: October 25, 2005

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: April 2006

PACAC Application Approval Date: May 9, 2006

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

Built in the late 1880’s, 548 Aylmer Street North has good cultural heritage value. It is one of three houses built by Benjamin Shortley, who was the proprietor of the Peterborough Saddlery and Harness Warehouse at 373 George Street North. Shortley and his family occupied the northern house, and built the two more to the south as tenements. The southern two houses are unique in that their main entrance is located at the side of the building, rather than facing the street. This was likely done so that Shortley could fit all three houses on the one
original lot.

The Shortley family resided at 550 Aylmer, and the other two houses were used as tenements. In 1912, Mr. E.H. Howson and his family moved into 548 Aylmer and rented the house for 40 years before purchasing the house from
Benjamin Shortley’s descendants in 1942. Mr. E.H. Howson eventually became the President and Director of the Peterborough Lock Company, once located on Simcoe Street (now the bus station). In 2006, the house was still
owned and occupied by Mr. E.H. Howson’s son, the Reverend Major Donald Howson.

The house has good architectural value as a relatively intact Victorian home with Italianate features. The trelliage trim on the verandah, the cast iron fencing at the sidewalk, and the coloured etched glass in the front door are all unique elements of the house. The orientation of the main entrance facing south, rather than the street, is rare for the Peterborough area.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Benjamin Shortley

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: Late 1880’s

BUILDER: Unknown

Site and setting:

Located in a residential area of late 19th and early 20th century housing, 548 Aylmer Street North is one of two houses built on this block of Aylmer Street that have their main facades oriented towards the side, rather than facing the street. Set on a small hilltop, like many of the houses on the east side of the street, 548 Aylmer Street
North is accessible from a set of stairs leading up from the sidewalk.

Surrounded by mature trees, the house is barely visible from the street. A wrought iron fence set into a stone wall separates the front yard from the sidewalk.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:  

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features: 

Exterior Elements:

Red brick 2 storey exterior with projecting 2 storey bay on the street
façade

Original fenestration including:

2 over 2 sash windows

Wood frames and sills

Wood shutters

Hip roof with gable over projecting bay

Original soffits and fascia

Porch, including:

Shed roof with gable over main entrance

Turned spindles 

Trelliage trim

Main entrance, including

4 panel door with 2 panes of etched coloured glass

Original hardware and knob

Transom 

Wrought iron fence set into stone wall

1930’s garage, including fenestration

558 Harvey St

Street Address: 558 Harvey Street

Roll Number: 040090124000000

PIN Number: 284840057

Short Legal Description: PT LT 3 S OF LONDON ST, E OF WATER ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH AS IN R621528; PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: May 5, 2006

On Site Evaluation Date: October 2005

Evaluation Category: B
Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: April 2006

PACAC Application Approval Date: May 9, 2006

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

Built in 1885, the Kincaid-Vincent House has good cultural heritage value. The historical value of 548 Harvey Street
resides in its association with John Kincaid, who was a noted contractor/carpenter, as well as a building assessor. In 1886, Kincaid and his business partner, George McWilliams, purchased the McKee Brothers furniture factory on Dickson’s raceway, and began manufacturing general woodwork for residential and commercial buildings.

As an established contractor, and soon-to-be partner in a woodworking business, John Kincaid built a larger house at 558 Harvey Street. The architectural value of this 2 storey red brick building resides in the unusual front porch,
which is likely a result of Kincaid’s skill as a carpenter, and access to woodworking materials. An interesting piece of architecture, the closed-in porch is very different from the open verandahs that are more common on brick 2
storey homes from this period. The Vincent family of Peterborough also contributes to the historical value of 558 Harvey Street, as they occupied the house for a noteworthy 86 years. James and Melissa Vincent bought the house in 1915. One of their eight children, Anne Adele, lived in the house until 2001.

ORIGINAL OWNER: John Kincaid

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1885

BUILDER: John Kincaid

Site and setting:

Located just blocks away from Peterborough’s downtown core, 558 Harvey Street is in the Dickson Mills neighbourhood. This neighbourhood emerged as the Dickson Mill grew and prospered on the nearby banks of the Otonabee River. Set in area of late 19th century houses, the Kincaid-Vincent House fits into the heritage character of the streetscape, which provides a variety of brick and frame, 1 or 2 storey houses.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:  

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features: 

Exterior Elements:

2 storey brick construction on cut stone foundation

Low hip roof with wide eaves

Soffits and fascia

Original fenestration

2 over 2 and 1 over 1 sash windows

Segmental arched topped

Flat topped

Brick voussoirs

Radiating

Flat

Main entrance

Original glass sidelights, transom and side panels

4 pane glazed door

Decorative brackets and trim

Wooden post columns

Balcony and railings on porch roof

Rear entrance

Porch with shingled hip roof

Columns

Railings

Decorative bracket trim

9 pane glazed door with transom

17 Merino Rd

Street Address: 17 Merino Road

Roll Number: 020070132000000

PIN Number: 284750030

Short Legal Description: PT LT 60 PL 70Q (NORTH MONAGHAN) AS IN R539829, S/T & T/W R539829; PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: August 8, 2006

On Site Evaluation Date: April 24, 2006

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: August 2006

PACAC Application Approval Date: August 8, 2006

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

Merino has excellent historical value in its association with the Wallis family. James Wallis, a Scottish immigrant, is
credited with being the founder of Fenelon Falls. In partnership with Robert Jameson, he built a sawmill, laid out the
town-site and began bringing in settlers to the new village. Over the years, Wallis purchased up to ten thousand acres of land in Fenelon Township. In 1840, James Wallis married Janet Fisher.

Wallis began construction of his farmhouse, ‘Merino’ (named after his prized sheep), in Peterborough in 1849, the same year Janet died. By the time the new house was complete in 1851, Wallis had married Louisa Forbes, and together they became known for their hospitality and entertaining at the Merino farmhouse. Known locally as ‘the Squire’, James was a businessman and magistrate, and founding president of the Peterborough Protestant Home.

Louisa was the President of the Peterborough Relief Society, and a supporter of Dr. Barnardo, who visited Merino in July 1884. Katherine Wallis, daughter of James and Louisa, grew up at Merino. She left at age 18 to study art in Edinburgh with her sister Adah, but they soon returned home to Merino to take care of their ailing parents.

In 1887, Louisa died and Adah and Katherine were left to nurse James and run Merino. In 1893, Katherine returned to Europe to study art, and in 1902 she began studying with Auguste Rodin. Her work has received international renown, and she was the first Canadian woman to be elected Societaire of the prestigious Societe des Beaux Arts.

Merino also has excellent architectural value, as it is one of few remaining stone farmhouses in the City of Peterborough. The original building was a Regency cottage: 1 ½ storeys with a large verandah, French doors and a low gable roof with center gable. A large summer kitchen with two gables on each side was built in the centered on the south side of the house. According to Katherine Wallis, it was remodelled in the early 1870’s. Since then, the verandah has been removed, and several more additions added on the rear of the original summer kitchen.

Merino also has good contextual value, although its setting has changed dramatically from the time of its original construction. Once a farmhouse on the edge of town, the house is now located in a suburban setting. Merino remains distinctive from neighbouring properties in its large lot and generous set back from the street.

ORIGINAL OWNER: James Wallis

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1849-1851

BUILDER: Unknown

Site and setting:

Set amidst mid to late 20th century suburban housing in the west end of Peterborough, Merino was the original farmhouse on the James Wallis property. Set back from the street, with an iron fence and gate protecting the semi-circular gravel drive, Merino is now accessed by a shared right-of-way at the west of the house. The house has a large front lawn, with many mature trees, and two stone pillars at the foot of the path leading to the main entrance.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

1 ½ storey fieldstone walls with trimmed limestone quoins of original house and summer kitchen

Gable roof with front facing center gable of original house

Gable roof of summer kitchen, with two additional wall gables on the east and west

Original fenestration, including:

Window surrounds and Transoms

Main entrance, including:

Transom and Door

Double stack stone chimneys on original house and brick summer kitchen chimney

Soffits and fascia

Crests on stone wall gable ends

Wrought iron gates

Landscape features, including:

Mature trees, Semi-circular gravel driveway, Stone pillars, Stone walkway

432 George St N

Street Address: 432 George Street North

Roll Number: 040100080000000

PIN Number: 281030035

Short Legal Description: PT LT 1 S OF BROCK ST AND E OF GEORGE (PETERBOROUGH) AS R568575 & PT 1 2 PL 45R10813, S/T & T/W R568575; PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: December 12, 2006 

On Site Evaluation Date: December 1, 2006

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: December 2006

PACAC Application Approval Date: December 12, 2006

Submission Date: January 2007

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

The Henry Newton Building at 432 George Street North has good cultural heritage value. Built circa 1870, the Henry Newton Building has good historical value in its long history of commercial occupants. One of the building’s first recorded commercial occupants was Henry Newton’s Home Furnishings from the mid 1880’s to 1895. From
1899 to 1908 a bicycle shop occupied the storefront. From 1910 to the mid 1950’s various shopkeepers sold dry goods and clothing, notably Louis Green from 1927 to 1938, with his widow Rae taking over in the 1940’s.

The building also has historical value in the residential accommodations on the second and third storeys, which were typically occupied by the owners of the store below. Rae Green continued to live above the store until the mid 1960’s, even after the store had changed ownership in 1955, when china and knick - knacks were sold until the 1980’s. The Henry Newton Building has good architectural value as a representative of a Victorian commercial building, which contributes to the 19th century streetscape of downtown Peterborough. The building also has excellent contextual value as a landmark building; it is the northern anchor of several continuous blocks of three storey buildings on George Street.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Richard Birdsall

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1870

BUILDER: Unknown

Site and setting:

Located at the north end of the late 19th century commercial downtown core of Peterborough, 432 George Street North is the north anchor of a stretch of three storey buildings that runs continuously down George Street on the east side. Flanked by a one storey modern structure to the north, to the south the 3 storey buildings run all the way to Simcoe Street.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

3 storey 3 bay brick rectangular structure

Flat roof

Renovated storefront

Decorative brickwork, including:

Arched and flat voussoirs

Corbelled string course above 3rd storey

Fenestration including sizing of wall openings and existing trim.

189 Hunter St W

Street Address: 189 Hunter Street West

Roll Number: 040050121000000

PIN Number: 281030082

Short Legal Description: PT LT 4 S OF HUNTER ST AND W OF GEORGE ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH PT 1, 2 45R1547; PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: December 12, 2006

On Site Evaluation Date: December 1, 2006

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: December 2006

PACAC Application Approval Date: December 12, 2006

Submission Date: January 2007

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

Built in the early 1880’s by local developer David Henthorne, Clancy’s Hotel has excellent cultural heritage value.
Clancy’s Hotel has excellent historical value as one of the oldest operating public houses in Peterborough. Used as a tavern and saloon since its construction in 1883, the first proprietors of Clancy’s Hotel were John Sullivan and John Clancy. The name of the hotel/tavern was to change almost as often as the proprietors, from Clancy’s to the Peterborough House to the American Hotel/House, Brownie’s Tavern and back again. The proprietors have included:
J. Head, Samuel Long, H. Blodgett, Frank and Eugene Sheedy, and Ray
McGregor.
In more recent years, the Legendary Red Dog, one of three pubs currently operating in the building, has become a renowned entertainment venue. The pub has hosted such notable Canadian entertainers as Neil Young, Sarah McLachlan, The Tragically Hip, Jeff Healey, the Cowboy Junkies, Ronnie Hawkins and many others.

Clancy’s Hotel also retains good architectural value. Although changes have been made to the building over its 123-year lifespan, the building retains the characteristic Mansard roof, dormer windows, and original fenestration on the second storey. The one story later addition to the west of the building continues the belt course of the original structure.

Clancy’s Hotel has excellent contextual value. A landmark building on Hunter Street West due to its longstanding presence as a public house, Clancy’s Hotel fits in well with the surrounding late 19th and early 20th century streetscape, which has become recognized as Peterborough’s central entertainment district.

ORIGINAL OWNER: David G. Henthorne ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1883

BUILDER: Unknown

Site and setting:

Located on the south side of Hunter Street West, Clancy’s Hotel is set right at the sidewalk, and is surrounded by late 19th and early 20th century commercial buildings. To the east is the Bell building, and to the west is a 2 storey commercial structure.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

3 storey brick structure (main building), 1 storey addition to the west and attached additions to the rear

Mansard roof, including

Dormer windows

Remaining brackets

Remains of chimneys

Cornice, eaves soffits and attendant mouldings

Fenestration, including:

Pressed metal window surrounds on the second story front façade

All wall openings as now sized including existing trim and sills

Dentilled belt cours

461-463 Gilmour St

Street Address: 461-463 Gilmour Street

Roll Number: 030080081000000

PIN Number: 280840165

Short Legal Description: LT 6 PL 73 PETERBOROUGH; PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: August 13, 2007

On Site Evaluation Date: October 27, 2005, revised July 25, 2007

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: August 2007

PACAC Application Approval Date: August 14, 2007

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

461-463 Gilmour Street has cultural heritage value as a good example of a late Victorian residence, built on
speculation by one of Peterborough’s finest contractors, Richard Sheehy. Built circa 1888, the Sheehy House was constructed by Richard Sheehy, who was just starting his contracting firm in Peterborough. An Irish immigrant from Tipperary, Richard trained as a bricklayer, working in San Francisco and Honolulu. Eventually known as Sheehy & Sons, his firm went on to build some of Peterborough’s best known buildings, including many local schools (Queen Mary, PCVS, Prince of Wales and King George), the Peterborough Armouries, and additions to Nicholls Hospital, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Mount St. Joseph. Richard Sheehy (a staunch Catholic) also retained contracts to build churches across southern Ontario, in Toronto, Port Hope, Welland and Peterborough (Sacred Heart, 1908, and All Saints, 1909). He was also an active supporter of the Conservative Party, and in 1919 Sheehy & Sons won the
contract to build the Nassau Dam from the federal Conservative-dominated Union government led by Sir Robert
Borden. In addition to these large scale projects and numerous municipal contracts for public work projects, a number of residences were built by Sheehy, usually as speculative construction.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Richard Sheehy

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION:

BUILDER: Richard Sheehy

Site and setting:

Set at the south side of Gilmour Street, just west of Park Street, 461-463 Gilmour residences of similar scale and proportions. is surrounded by late 19th century It has a shallow setback from the streetscape, and a 1950s addition to the rear. A small garden is located on the east lawn, and a shared laneway runs between the backyards of the abutting Charlotte and Gilmour Street properties.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

The triple brick construction of the first storey, and double brick construction of the second storey

The stone foundation

Hip roof with front gable facade

All original fenestration, including stained and coloured glass, transoms, and sash

All original entrance doors

Front and side porches, including trelliage trim and railings

Decorative brickwork in front facade

362 Hunter St W

Street Address: 362 Hunter Street West

Roll Number: 030060013000000

PIN Number: 280890024

Short Legal Description: PT LT 18 N OF HUNTER & W OF GEORGE ST PL 1 PETERBOROUGH AS IN R659013; PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: Original - January 6, 2005

Reapplication - August 13, 2007

On Site Evaluation Date: September 27, 2004

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: August 2007

PACAC Application Approval Date: Original - January 11, 2005

Reapplication - August 14, 2007

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

The John Douglas Cottage, built as a rental unit for the merchant craftsman class, is significant as one of the best
examples of a Regency style brick cottage in Peterborough. Constructed in the 1860’s, it is the centre cottage of three very similar small Regency cottages built by John Thomas Douglas. The John Douglas Cottage is the best-preserved example of these three cottages, having retained its original windows and sidelights, and a unique
Tudor-esque stained glass transom. Over the years, the house has been occupied by merchants and skilled tradesmen, several of whom have worked at Peterborough industrial institutions such as Quaker Oats and General
Electric.

ORIGINAL OWNERS: John Thomas Douglas

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1865-1869

BUILDER: Unknown

Site and setting:

Located on Hunter Street West between Downie Street, Donegal Street and Park Street, the John Douglas Cottage is the middle unit of three Regency cottages. The cottages to the east and west have been significantly altered. This cottage shares a small shed with the cottage on the east side, suggesting that it was built on half a lot. The cottages are set in a 19th century residential neighbourhood, consisting mainly of larger 2-3 storey houses. The Bishop’s Palace and St. Peter’s Rectory occupy the block directly to the east of the cottages. The street is quiet and accented with large mature trees.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

The red brick construction resting on a water-table of buff brick on a rough cut stone foundation

All original fenestration, including the 6/6 sash, 2/2 storms and basement windows

Main entrance, including Tudor-style transom, and sidelights

Low hip roof with 2 symmetrically placed chimneys

Buff coloured brick quoins

Original wooden soffits and window sills

The front porch addition with its square columns and hip roof

3 Engleburn Place

Street Address: 3 Engleburn Place

Roll Number: 040110189000000

PIN Number: 281390023

Short Legal Description: LT 19 PL 124 PETERBOROUGH CITY; PT LT 20 PL 124 PETERBOROUGH CITY AS IN

R624971 S/T ORNAMENTAL RESERVES PL 124; PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: August 13, 2007

On Site Evaluation Date: June 27 2007

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: August 2007

PACAC Application Approval Date: August 14, 2007

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

Built circa 1907, the Robert A. Elliott House has good cultural heritage value through its historical associations and wellpreserved architecture. The Robert A. Elliott House was constructed on land that had formerly been part of the Engleburn estate, which was Reverend Mark Burnham’s 28-acre farm and its Classical Revival home built in 1853. In the first decade of the 20th century, the farm and estate lands were subdivided into the Engleburn Park lots, and Robert A. Elliot, local businessman and real estate agent, purchased lots 9-12 and built his home on the corner
lot. Reputedly the original site of the Engleburn tennis courts, the Robert A. Elliot House was constructed with ‘sandbricks’ (cement bricks) from Elliott’s North Monaghan company (with co-owner William Harstone), the Sandstone Brick Co. Elliott sold off the remaining lots in the following years, and 4 more houses of the same era were constructed with ‘sandbricks’, a product that was marketed nation-wide. The Elliott’s occupied the house for less than a decade, and since 1918, there have only been 4 owners of the house.

 While the house is a typical 2 ½ storey home of the Edwardian period, it has anumber of unique details that contribute to its architectural significance. It features all original windows, many with stained or etched coloured glass, shutters, cedar gable shingles, doors, and stable at the south end of the property.

The construction of the house using the locally made ‘sandbricks’, and the rounded edges of the bricks at window and door opening are also unusual features. The recessed main entrance with double arches was used as a pattern for new development in the area, in order for new homes to blend with the neighbourhood.

The Robert A. Elliot House represents one of the first homes in Ashburnham built in a privately planned subdivision. It was part of the second era of development in the neighbourhood; the first represented by Engleburn and the Absalom Ingram House. This second era represents Peterborough during its growing industrial age and the expansion and prosperity that came with it.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Robert A. Elliott

ARCHITECT: unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1907

BUILDER: unknown

Site and setting:

Located on a corner lot in Peterborough’s old Ashburnham, the Robert A. Elliott House sits opposite one of Peterborough’s residential landmarks, Engleburn, the historic home of the Burnham family. While the neighbourhood consists mainly of early to mid 20th century homes, a row of recent infill housing has used the recessed entrance arches of the Robert A. Elliot House in order to blend in with the streetscape.

Summary of heritage attributes to be designated:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

Sandstone brick 2-½ storey exterior walls on stone foundation

• Hip roof with front wall gable and west wall gable, including cedar gable shingles

• Original fenestration, including:

9 over 1 sash with decorative glass

Stained glass

Single decorative glass panels

Cut stone sills

All remaining shutters

Rounded bricks surrounding all door and window openings

Recessed main entrance under archway, including: double Front door, Stained glass transom

Side porch footprint, including original stone piers

1-½ storey coach house (portion within the lot area) with gable roof, including any remaining original fenestration

Wire fence along east side of property

526 McDonnel St

Street Address: 526 McDonnel Street

Roll Number: 030010105000000

PIN Number: 280860113 

Short Legal Description: PT OF PARK LT 17 IN LT 13 CON 13 (NORTH MONAGHAN) & PT OF LTS 42, 43 & 44 AND PT OF PETERBOROUGH CREEK PL 34 AND LTS 17, 18, 19, 20, BLK A AND PT OF BLK B, PT OF CORDACH AVENUE, PT OF CAMBRIDGE AVENUE CLOSED BY M38972 AND PT OF PETERBOROUGH CREEK PL 121;

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: August 13, 2007

On Site Evaluation Date:

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: August 2007

PACAC Application Approval Date: August 14, 2007

Short statement of reasons for heritage designation: 

The Bonner-Worth Mill Factory Building has important connections to labour, political and industrial history, as well as excellent architectural and landmark value. The Bonner-Worth Mill Factory Building was the site of one of Peterborough’s most violent labour disputes, which itself had provincial and national repercussions. Labour organization began in Peterborough at both the Bonner Worth and Auburn Woollen Mills, and the strike of 1937 was the first of its kind in Peterborough leading to violent confrontations and division within the community.

Within the context of Ontario labour history, the Peterborough strike of 1937 resulted in an inquest into wages and working conditions, ordered by Premier Mitchell Hepburn. The inquest produced Special Order No. 1, which set minimum wages for men and women in the textile industries. This was the first legislation of its kind, and made under the provisions of the Minimum Wage Act of 1937.

The strike had political ramifications as well. The day after Peterborough workers returned to work, Premier Hepburn called an early election. Riding on the success in Peterborough, Hepburn condemned the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO), and successfully portrayed them as communist sympathizers. He won a landslide victory over Conservative candidate Earl Rowe.

Within a national context, the involvement of the CIO struck fear into the hearts of Canadian industrialists. Although individuals involved in the Peterborough strike denounced any connection to the organization, both the media and the government
played on public fears. Local papers announced the forthcoming involvement of textile workers across the nation, but such support never materialized. Linked with violence and communism, the CIO was viewed with suspicion across Canada.

Examined within the framework of industrial activity in Peterborough, the BonnerWorth Mill Factory Building is a testament to Peterborough’s industrial success. Constructed during the peak of industrial expansion in early twentieth century Peterborough, the Bonner-Worth Mill company (later Canadian Woollens, and then Dominion Woollens and Worsteds) flourished and contributed to the overseas war efforts during World War I. The buildings continued to be used for industrial purposes for many years after Dominion Woolens and Worsteds left Peterborough. In the 1960’s they became the first campus of Sir Sandford Fleming College and have recently been renovated into affodable housing apartments. 

The Bonner-Worth Factory Building is an interesting and largely intact example of early 20th century industrial architecture. Constructed in three phases, the two later additions (1913 & 1916) to the Mill complex were designed by William Blackwell, one of Peterborough’s most prominent architects. The low horizontal lines of the building contrast with the vertical 2 storey recessed panels that frame the large windows; these were designed to maximize daylight during working hours. 

The building remains a landmark on the streetscape, because of its substantial size and massing, as well as its well-known historical associations. While a number of additions and outbuildings to the rear of the main building have been removed in recent renovations, the Bonner-Worth Mill Factory Building retains much of its original
appearance from the street, complimenting the other extant Mill buildings that were severed from the property years ago.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Bonner-Worth Mill Company

ARCHITECT: 1911: unknown, 1913 & 1916: William Blackwell

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1911, 1913 & 1916

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT - SITE AND SETTING:

Situated on the north side of McDonnel Street, the Bonner-Worth Mill Factory Building is flanked on the west by the 1920’s Administration building and Jackson Creek to the east. To the south is an early 20th century residential neighbourhood, much of which was factory worker housing.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • Long, horizontal massing of the 2 storey buff brick structure with square brick rear addition
  • Rubble stone foundation
  • Flat roof
  • 2 storey recessed brick panelsframing fenestration
  • Brick voussoirs, transoms and limestone and cast stone sills surrounding windows
  • Any remaining original entrances

480-484 Weller St

Street Address: 484 Weller Street

Roll Number: 030050221000000

PIN Number: 280850232

Short Legal Description: PT LTS 3 & 4 PL 49 (PETERBOROUGH) & PT LT 4 PL 25 (PETERBOROUGH) AS IN R367882; PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: DSC: May 30, 2007

General Committee: June 12, 2007

On Site Evaluation Date: September 2006

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: May 2007

PACAC Application Approval Date: June 12, 2007

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

The Morrow Estate has excellent cultural heritage value in its association with the Morrow family of Peterborough and as a good representation of the impressive Victorian residences of Peterborough’s elite.

The Morrow Estate has excellent historical value through its first owners, William George Morrow and Emma Jane Morrow.

William George Morrow moved to Peterborough from the Cavan area when he was young, and was educated in local schools. His uncle, George A. Cox, one of the most successful businessmen in Canada, gave him his first job in the office of the Toronto Savings and Loan Company. By the time of his death in 1939, W.G. Morrow was the managing Director of the Toronto Savings and Loan, the President of the Peterborough Lock Manufacturing Company, vice-president of the Imperial Life Assurance Company, director of the Central Canada Loan and Savings Company, and director of the National Trust Company. He had served as Mayor of Peterborough from 1910-1911, and bequeathed $600,000 in his will for the new City Hall (built in 1951).

The remaining pieces of the Morrow Estate are good examples of an upper class property in Victorian Peterborough. When built, the house and its outbuildings were buffered from neighbouring properties with grounds and a longer laneway. The
subdivision of lots and subsequent opening of the Hunter Street extension chopped away at the property to its current swath of land, now a relatively small patch of lawn and garden surrounding the house. The house itself, a Victorian mishmash of design elements, is a generously proportioned to demonstrate the prosperity of the owners. The house was altered in the 1940’s when the building was divided
into apartments.

The cottage, located at the rear of the house, is largely intact, and now used
for apartments as well. It is architecturally unique in Peterborough, with its steep bell-cast hip roof and large gabled dormers. 

Also included in the estate is a wood frame drive-shed to the rear of the cottage. Though not as architecturally impressive as the other structures, it contributes to the contextual and historical value of the former estate, and may be the oldest building on the property. The building originallyy had 6 carriage stalls to the north.

ORIGINAL OWNER: George and Emma Jane Morrow

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1890

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

Set slightly back from Weller Street on a small rise in the land, the Morrow Estate
is one of the most imposing residences in a neighbourhood of large, upscale
homes. One of the oldest homes on Weller Street, the 2-½ storey house is
surrounded by mature trees and plantings. The driveway runs up the east line of
the property, leading to the 1-½ storey cottage and parking for the tenants of the
building.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all
elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim,
together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and
glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements (Main House):

  • 2 ½ storey red brick construction of original house (not including 1950’s addition) on stone foundation
  • Hip roof with gable end at projecting bay
  • Red brick chimneys
  • Decorative brackets, soffits and fascia
  • Original fenestration, including:
    • All historic glass
    • Wooden sills and surrounds
    • Sash and fixed pane windows
    • Triple Palladian-style windows
    • Dormers
    • Transoms
    • French doors
    • Flat and arched voussoirs
  • Main entrance, including:
    • Paneled door
    • Stained glass transom
    • Recessed entrance alcove

Exterior Elements (Cottage):

  • 1-½ storey 2 bay red brick structure with quoins
  • Steep bell-cast gable roof, including:
    • 2 front (south) facing steep gable wall dormers
    • 2 side (east and west) facing steep gable wall dormers
    • Small triple shed dormer on rear (north)
  • Brick chimney
  • Original fenestration, including:
    • All historic glass
    • Wooden sills and surrounds
    • Sash and fixed pane windows

Exterior Elements (Drive-shed):

  • 1 ½ storey wooden frame and cladding
  • Gable roof
  • Paneled entrance door and garage door
  • Small shed roof over garage door

Landscape features:

  • Hand pump in back garden
  • Mature trees

443 Reid St

Street Address: 443 Reid Street

Roll Number: 030060110000000

PIN Number: 280880181

Short Legal Description: LTS 16 & 17 N OF BROCK ST & W OF GEORGE ST (PETERBOROUGH), PT LTS 16 & 17 S OF MURRAY ST & W OF GEORGE ST (PETERBOROUGH), PT 2 PL 45R10970, EXCEPT PTS 1,2 & 3 PL 45R13000, S/T & T/W
R652655; PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Concurrence: Unknown

PACAC Application Review Date: May 9, 2006, revised May 30 2007

On Site Evaluation Date: February 9, 2006

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: May 2006, revised May 2007

PACAC Application Approval Date: May 9, 2006, revised May 30, 2007

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION

St. Peter’s Elementary School has excellent cultural heritage value as an intact educational facility from the 1950’s with strong ties to the local community and neighbourhood. St. Peter’s Elementary School has historical value as an example of community support for Peterborough’s Catholic school board, as local fundraisers provided over $500,000 for the school’s construction.

Opened in 1952, St. Peter’s Elementary was an all boys school until 1956 when it merged with the local girls school, St. Mary’s. Designed to hold 300 students, it also provided a large double wood floor gymnasium for the use of both elementary students and St. Peter’s Secondary School students. St. Peter’s Elementary School closed in 2003 due to a decline in enrollment. However, the school building remains an important and vital memory to the thousands of students who spent a large portion of their childhood within the walls. Its continues to be a landmark building in a neighbourhood of imposing structures, and is especially important in its relationship to the cluster of historic buildings still owned and operated by the Roman Catholic Church such as the Cathedral of St. Peter in Chains, St. Peter’s Rectory and Bishop’s Palace.

The architectural value of the former St. Peter’s Elementary School is as an intact representation of 1950’s institutional architecture. Both interior and exterior features contribute to the buildings architectural significance. The auditorium entrance lobby and elaborate exterior east façade with pilasters and medallions are of especial note. 

ORIGINAL OWNER: PETERBOROUGH VICTORIA CATHOLIC DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD

ARCHITECT: James Haffa

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1952-1953

BUILDER: George Hardy

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

Set north-east of the block of churches on Reid and Rubidge Streets, St. Peter’s Elementary School is surrounded by late 19th and early 20th century residential areas to the west. To the immediate north are the remaining buildings of the William Hamilton estate and foundry.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all
elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • Two storey, buff brick exterior walls and foundation;
  • Rectangular massing and horizontal lines of the building
  • All decorative brickwork and masonry, including:
    • Emblems, medallions and crests
    • Vertical masonry recesses for 2 storey window openings including the recesses for two decorative blinded windows on the southwest end of the auditorium
    • Inlaid brick crosses on north elevation of main block
    • Projecting pediment at north entrance on east elevation including monumental masonry cap
  • All fenestration, including:
    • 2 storey windows set in recessed panels on the south façade with glass blocks and steel casements
    • All other original metal frame windows and muntins
    • All glass block
  • Flat roof
  • North-east entrance, including:
    • Double leaf doors, each with 8 lights
    • 9 light transom
    • Original hardware
    • Flanking light fixtures
  • Entablature and flanking pilasters including:
    • “St. Peter’s School” lettering
    • Decorative emblems
    • Dentils
    • Wrought iron railing on second storey
    • Two storey glass block window with stylized masonry hood
  • Auditorium façade, including:
    • 3 bay entrance flanked by 4 concrete pilasters
      • 3 sets of double leaf doors
    • All decorative crests and medallions
    • Entablature including:
      • 4 decorative emblems
      • ‘Auditorium’ lettering
    • Exterior lighting flanking the entry doors
    • Wrought iron railings on second storey

Interior Elements:

  • Auditorium entrance lobby, including:
    • Patterned terrazzo floor
    • Terrazzo fountain
    • North staircase, including decorative iron railings
    • Plaque honouring Right Reverend Monsignor Peter P. Butler
    • Decorative iron railings on stairs and at window openings
    • Original exit signage, lighting fixtures and fitting where code compliant.

570 Water St

Street Address: 570 Water Street

Roll Number: 040090093000000

PIN Number: 284840011

Short Legal Description: PT LT 1 N OF LONDON ST & E OF WATER ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH AS IN R505582; PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: December 2007

On Site Evaluation Date: November 16, 2007

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: December 2007

PACAC Application Approval Date: December 11, 2007

 

Note: A memorandum of understanding between the property owners and the City of Peterborough has also been developed.

STATEMENT OF CULTURAL HERITAGE VALUE OR INTEREST:

Hazlitt House has excellent cultural heritage value in its associations with a prominent 19th century Peterborough family, and their connection to one of early Peterborough’s
most important industries. It is also an extremely well-preserved example of the
Italianate composite architecture likely developed by local architect John E. Belcher. The house was built between 1875 and 1880 for Thomas Hazlitt, who had worked for Peterborough’s lumber baron, Samuel Dickson, and also married one of Dickson’s daughters, Mary Ann. When Samuel Dickson drowned in his own millpond in 1870, Thomas Hazlitt became general manager of the Dickson Lumber Company, a position he held until his own death in 1899. The house was sold soon after Thomas’s death, and a series of owners who were also heavily involved in local industries, including the Greene foundry on McDonnel Street, and the Peterborough Cereal Company, lived in the house until the 1950s. In 1956, the Children’s Aid Society purchased the building, and remained there until the 1980s.

The house has excellent architectural value as a very well preserved 19th century residence, in an Italianate composite style of architecture. It is very likely that the house was designed by John E. Belcher, one of the most important architects practicing in 19th century Peterborough. Also the City’s Chief Engineer, Belcher designed several other properties in Peterborough that show a stylistic similarity to the Hazlitt House. Notable elements of this variation of the Italianate style includes the wide overhanging eaves with paired brackets, tall narrow windows, and projecting bays at the northwest and southeast corners of the house. 

The Hazlitt House also has excellent contextual value as a landmark building in the 19th century residential streetscape, just north of the City’s downtown core. Built at this location because of its proximity to the Dickson Lumber Mills, as well as to the
commercial centre of the town, the Hazlitt House is one of two large scale, well-preserved residential conversions on this stretch of Water Street, the other being Harstone House.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Thomas Hazlitt

ARCHITECT: Attributed to John E. Belcher

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1875-1880

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:
Located at the northeast corner of Water and London streets, just north of Peterborough’s downtown commercial core, the Hazlitt House is part of an intact 19th century residential neighbourhood known as the Dickson Mills, because of its
proximity to the former Dickson Lumber Mills. Constructed close to the Otonabee River, this large 2-½ storey house is one of two landmark buildings bookending Water Street, with Harstone House located directly west of the house. The Hazlitt House has been converted from residential to commercial use and a large section of the side garden has been converted to parking space.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features.

Exterior Elements:

  • The 2 ½ storey Italianate composite form and design, with 1 storey summer kitchen wing;
  • The buff brick exterior walls on foundation of even-coursed cut pink granite with cut limestone top dressing;
  • The steep hipped roof with gable ends over projecting bays on south and west facades;
  • The remaining chimneys;
  • The wraparound porch on the Water Street and London Street facades, including Tuscan Doric columns resting on a brick parapet with cut sandstone coping, and projecting portico with decorated pediment over south entrance stairs;
  • The rear porch, including Tuscan Doric columns resting on brick parapet with cut sandstone coping;
  • The original and historic fenestration, including double hung sash windows, cut lung sill decorated lintels, and dormer windows with gable roofs, cornice returns and decorative wood surrounds; 
  • The garage extension, including projecting frontipiece of cut stone with parapet and double-arched entrance doors, and buff brick body with dentils and single brackets.  

220 Brock St

Street Address: 220 Brock Street

Roll Number: 040060032000000

PIN Number: 281060077

Short Legal Description: PT LT 6 W OF GEORGE ST & N OF BROCK ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH; PT LT 7 W OF GEORGE ST & N OF BROCK ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH AS IN R309007; PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: December 2007

On Site Evaluation Date: June 27, 2007

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: December 2007

PACAC Application Approval Date: December 11, 2007

Submission Date: January 2008

STATEMENT OF CULTURAL HERITAGE VALUE OR INTEREST:

The W.J. Hall House has excellent cultural heritage value in its association with several
prominent 19th century Peterborough citizens, as well as in its well-preserved architecture. It also has contextual significance, being one of three grandly scaled houses built in the same era and the same design in a row along Brock Street.

Built in the late 1870’s, the house was constructed for William J. Hall, a property agent and evaluator. William passed away at the turn of the century, and his widow Martha continued to live in the house until 1904.

The house then became the home and office of Dr. John H. Eastwood, from 1905 to 1925, who likely used the one story addition at the rear of the house as his surgery.

In the 1930s, the house was divided into apartments, and remains as such to date. The W.J. Hall House is a vernacular interpretation of the Italianate style. It has the wide eaves, decorative brackets and projecting bays of typical of the style, as well as tall arched windows. The house retains many of its original architectural features, including the unique roofline with conical bell-cast rooftops over the projecting bays, as well as fenestration.

The W.J. Hall House also has strong contextual value in its relationship to the two similar late 19th century mansion-style buildings to the immediate west. These three properties, constructed within 5 years of each other, each in a variation of a common design, are a unique and valuable part of the 19th century streetscape.

ORIGINAL OWNER: W.J. Hall

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: Late 1870’s

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

Located on Brock Street at Aylmer, the W.J. Hall House is one of three large Victorian mansions built side by side within several years of each other. These three houses are of similar design, scale and proportion, with small variations to give each one a unique character. Each house has a rear lot, once used for carriage houses or stables, now used mainly for parking. To the immediate east of the house is the Brock Towers (a large modern apartment building) and across the street to the south are the Price Chopper grocery store (formerly the site of the Brock Arena), and several small 19th century residences.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • 2 storey buff brick structure with 2 symmetrical projecting bays;
  • Low hipped roof with and bellcast pointed turrets over the projecting bays;
  • Wide overhanging eaves, and all remaining brackets;
  • Tall, arched and rounded corner fenestration, including 1/1 and 2/2 sash, wooden surrounds and sills;
  • Decorative brickwork, including label surrounds over fenestration and entrances, and chimney wall panels;
  • Main entrance porch, by paired columns, including double leaf doors, and transom;
  • Second story balcony
    entrance, including double leaf doors, and transom;
  • Remaining chimney stacks;
  • 1 storey addition on the north façade with gable roof, including historic doors and fenestration.

379 Reid St

Street Address: 379 Reid Street

Roll Number: 030070121000000

PIN Number: 280890055

Short Legal Description: PT LT 16 N OF SIMCOE ST & W OF GEORGE ST PL 1 PETERBOROUGH AS IN R512854, EXCEPT THE EASEMENT THEREIN; S/T R512854; PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: December 10

On Site Evaluation Date: July 2007

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: December 2007

PACAC Application Approval Date: December 11, 2007

Submission Date: January 21, 2008

STATEMENT OF CULTURAL HERITAGE VALUE OR INTEREST:

The J.J. Duffus House at 379 Reid Street has good cultural heritage value in its association with a prominent citizen of early 20th century Peterborough, and through its contribution to an intact streetscape of late 19th and early 20th century residences and landmarks.

379 Reid Street has historical value through its association with Joseph Duffus, the builder and first owner of the house. Joseph J. Duffus was born in Peterborough in 1876, and throughout his extensive career he was a farmer, businessman, builder and a decorated member of the military. He served as an alderman for Peterborough and was mayor in 1916-1917. He was the president of many important municipal and provincial organizations such as the Chamber of Commerce and the Plowmen’s Association. Duffus was elected to the House of Commons in 1935 as a Liberal candidate and served on the Senate from 1940 until his death in 1957.

Duffus had many real estate investments and rental properties across the City of Peterborough, and this investment house at 379 Reid Street was immediately let out to Fanny Redmond, who married John Torpey, a grandson of another John Torpey who was part of the Peter Robinson immigration. Since then, 379 Reid has had numerous owners and tenants, first as a single family home, and then, beginning in 1964, as several apartments.

The J.J. Duffus House has architectural value as a local variation of an Edwardian style house, and has many similarities to the pattern book houses of the early 20th century. 379 Reid Street is one of many Edwardian homes in the City of Peterborough and is one of the best preserved, having retained its original front and back verandahs, many original windows (including stained glass) and beveled glass front door. It is also a good example of double brick construction, a method that was quickly replaced by framed structures.

The J.J. Duffus House has contextual value as a contributing structure to an intact neighbourhood of late 19th and early 20th century residences and landmarks. Located
across the street from some of Peterborough’s best known historic landmarks, including the Cathedral of St. Peter’s in Chains, the Knights of Columbus Hall, and Trinity United Church, the house continues the stretch of 2 and 3 storey historic residences along the west side of Reid Street.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Joseph J. Duffus 

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1907 

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:
The J.J. Duffus House is set in a neighbourhood of similarly scaled 2 and 3 storey late 19th and early 20th century residential homes. It is located on the west side of the row of 19th century churches, including Trinity United, Cathedral of St. Peter in Chains, and the Knights of Columbus Hall, that are at the centre of the one-way street system of Reid and Rubidge streets. The character f the streetscape is defined by houses with medium depth setback from the street, and mature trees.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • Edwardian Classicism design
  • 2 ½ storey red brick exterior walls on cut limestone foundation
  • Front facing gabled roof, with side wall gable and tall single chimney at the rear gable end
  • Front verandah, including entrance stairs and railing, off-centre pedimented portico, triple Doric columns on brick piers, railings and porch skirting 
  • Rear verandah, including railings on first and second storeys, single Doric columns and porch skirting
  • Fenestration, including 4 and 6 pane fixed windows and storms, double hung sash, stylized Palladian window in attic light, stained glass transoms and windows, and wood sills and surrounds
  • Main entrance, including original beveled glass door, stained glass transom

 

388 Mark St

Street Address: 388 Mark Street

Roll Number: 040130085000000

PIN Number: 281360005

Short Legal Description: PT LT 8 S OF HUNTER ST & E OF MARK ST PL 1A VILLAGE OF ASHBURNHAM; LT 79 PL 1A VILLAGE OF ASHBURNHAM PTS 1 & 2 45R10250, S/T R601359; PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: December 2007

On Site Evaluation Date: July 2007

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure 

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: December 2007

PACAC Application Approval Date: December 11, 2007

Submission Date: January 2008

STATEMENT OF CULTURAL HERITAGE VALUE OR INTEREST:

The Forsyth Labourer’s Cottage has good cultural heritage value in its association with early industries in Ashburnham, and as a good representative of a small 19th century worker’s cottage with an unusual coved soffit.

In 1873, William Forsyth bought a parcel of land at Elizabeth Street (now Hunter Street East) and Mark Street from Marcello Mowry, businessman, industrialist and politician. Forsyth, a local businessman who brought the first grain separator to Peterborough, appears to have built the cottage as a rental home for local workers circa 1875-1880. He sold the property to Robert McKee and Robert Davidson, also local businessmen and owners of the Peterborough Hardware Company, who continued to rent the property out to labourers. 

In 1903, Michael O’Brien bought the property. He was the first owner of the property to actually live in the house with his wife and their children. Michael died in 1945, but his wife, Elizabeth, stayed on at the house until her death in 1973. 

This simple and unassuming cottage has architectural value as a representative of a late 19th century worker’s cottage. While this 1-½ storey residence is very plain in appearance, it does feature a very unique coved soffit that runs around the entire house.

ORIGINAL OWNER: William Forsyth

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1875-1880
BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

Located on the east side of Mark Street, just south of Hunter Street East, in Ashburnham, the Forsyth Labourer’s Cottage has a much deeper setback from the street that its neighbouring properties. This small 1-½ storey cottage contributes to the Mark Street streetscape comprised of small to mid-sized late 19th century residences. The Rotary Trail (formerly a rail line) runs along the eastern boundary of the rear yard.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • The simple 1-½ storey cottage form
  • The red brick exterior walls, resting on a rubble stone foundation
  • The low gable roof
  • The original fenestration
  • The coved soffit

396-400 George St N

Street Address: 396-400 George Street North

Roll Number: 040100070000000

PIN Number: 281030056

Short Legal Description: LT A PL 100 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH; LT K PL 100 PETERBOROUGH CITY S/T & T/W INTEREST IN R646960; EXCEPT THE EASEMENT THEREIN; PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: December 2007

On Site Evaluation Date: July 2007

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: December 2007

PACAC Application Approval Date: December 11, 2007

Submission Date: January 2008

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

The building at 396-400 George Street North has very good cultural heritage value in its historical associations with the Toronto-Dominion Bank, and significance as an anchor building on the southeast corner of George Street North and Hunter Street.

Built circa 1862 after the fire that swept down George Street in 1861, the building consists of 5 different storefronts (396 and 400 George, 143, 145, 147 Hunter), as well as offices and apartments on the second and third storeys. The building was occupied by a variety of commercial tenants for its first thirty years, including a clothier and a watchmaker.

In 1891, the building’s most notable tenant, the Bank of Toronto, moved into the 400 George Street storefront and remained there until 2000, merging in 1955 with Dominion Bank to create the Toronto Dominion Bank. During the bank’s 109 years at this location, the appearance of the building was dramatically altered to reflect the more popular architectural styles of the early 20th century. 

The other storefronts and office spaces within the building continued to be occupied by various commercial and professional enterprises over the years. Medical and dental offices were located in the second and third storey offices between 1925 and 1967, alongside insurance companies and barristers. The architectural firm of Blackwell and Craig was also located in the building in 1949, and were the designers of some of Peterborough’s most notable structures. The firm, which is the longest continually running architectural firm in Canada, evolved into Craig, Zeidler and Strong in the 1960s; in 1962, the head offices of the firm moved to Toronto. The firm is now known as the Zeidler Partner Architects and has gone on to design notable structures such as the Toronto Eaton Centre and Ontario Place.

The Bank of Toronto Building has good architectural value, despite various changes
made to the façade over the years. originallyy a 4 storey building, the striking Second Empire details (including the mansard roof and corner tower) were removed in the 1920s. The remaining 3 storey building was pared down to a more somber Classical Revival style, with pilasters flanking the main entrance.

The Bank of Toronto Building has excellent contextual value as an anchor building to one of downtown Peterborough’s busiest intersections. The building continues the line of three storey facades running along both George and Hunter Streets.

ORIGINAL OWNER: John Thompson

ARCHITECT: unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1862

BUILDER: unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

A substantial 3-storey building at the southeast corner of George Street North and Hunter Street, this landmark structure is comprised of several commercial storefronts with rental units on the upper levels. It continues the rhythm of 3 storey Victorian commercial structures running along both sides of George Street and Hunter Street.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim,
together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and
glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • The three storey structure with rounded corner
  • The cornice line of simple modillions
  • The fenestration, including:
    • Paired corner windows
    • Round and flat top window heads
    • 2/2 sash
  • Decorative cast medallions on first storey
  • The rear façade of the building, facing the back laneway

419 George St N

Street Address: 419 George Street North

Roll Number: 040060049000000

PIN Number: 281030029

Short Legal Description: PT LT 1 N OF HUNTER ST AND W OF GEORGE ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH AS IN R513246; PETERBOROUGH CITY 

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: December 2007

On Site Evaluation Date: July 2007

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: December 2007

PACAC Application Approval Date: December 11, 2007

Submission Date: January 2008

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

The Old Examiner building at 419 George Street North, has excellent cultural heritage
value.

419 George Street has excellent historical value as one of the early homes of the
Peterborough Examiner, Peterborough’s longest running newspaper. The Examiner moved into the building between 1889 and 1893, when it was owned and operated by J.R. Stratton. Stratton went on to become the Liberal MPP for Peterborough (during
his years running the paper), ensuring that its content was staunchly Liberal.

In the mid 1930s the Examiner moved to offices at 400 Water Street. However, the printing equipment that remained in the building was taken over by the Peterborough Printing Company and put to use for job printing, bookbinding and catalogue making.
The company changed its name in the early 1960s to Maxwell Printers and Lithographers Ltd., and operated in the building until 1969. The building then sat vacant for several years.

The Old Examiner Building also has good architectural value as the most intact 19th century commercial building on the block. It retains its cast iron storefront and window surrounds, as well as elaborate cornice line. These elaborate Victorian elements reflected the prosperity of the commercial enterprise housed within.

The Old Examiner Building has excellent contextual value as a mid-block building that
continues the pattern of 3-storey buildings on George Street. It dominates the streetscape with its heavy cornice line, cast iron storefront, and hood mouldings above the second and third storey windows.

OIGINAL OWNER: George A. Cox and Thomas Donnely

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1875

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

Set in the middle of George Street North's 19th century Victorian streetscape, the Old
Examiner Building continues the pattern of three storey facades that flank the building
to the north and south. The buildings to the north and south have been subject to recent modifications of their fenestration and cornices lines, making the Old Examiner
Building the most intact building on the west side of George Street between Brock and
Hunter streets.

Rear access to the building is from Chamber Street, one of the interesting sidestreets off the downtown.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • 3 storey brick structure, including George Street and Chamber Street facades
  • Original fenestration, including:
    • Square or segmental archedwindows
    • Any remaining 2 over 2 or 6 over 6 windows
    • Elaborate hood moulding on 2nd and 3rd storey George Street façade
    • Wood sills and surrounds on the Chamber Street façade
  • Flat roofline with side parapet walls and brick chimney
  • 3rd storey cornice line and brackets, 1st storey cornice line and dentils
  • Cast iron storefront supports and arched entrance on George Street façade

365 George St N

Street Address: 396-400 George Street North

Roll Number: 040100070000000

PIN Number: 281030056

Short Legal Description: LT A PL 100 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH; LT K PL 100 PETERBOROUGH CITY S/T & T/W INTEREST IN R646960; EXCEPT THE EASEMENT THEREIN; PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: December 2007

On Site Evaluation Date: July 2007

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: December 2007

PACAC Application Approval Date: December 11, 2007

Submission Date: January 2008

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION

The building at 396-400 George Street North has very good cultural heritage value in its historical associations with the Toronto-Dominion Bank, and significance as an anchor building on the southeast corner of George Street North and Hunter Street.

Built circa 1862 after the fire that swept down George Street in 1861, the building consists of 5 different storefronts (396 and 400 George, 143, 145, 147 Hunter), as well as offices and apartments on the second and third storeys. The building was occupied by a variety of commercial tenants for its first thirty years, including a clothier and a watchmaker. 

In 1891, the building’s most notable tenant, the Bank of Toronto, moved into the 400 George
Street storefront and remained there until 2000, merging in 1955 with Dominion Bank to
create the Toronto Dominion Bank. During the bank’s 109 years at this location, the appearance of the building was dramatically altered to reflect the more popular architectural styles of the early 20th century.

The other storefronts and office spaces within the building continued to be occupied by various commercial and professional enterprises over the years. Medical and dental offices were located in the second and third storey offices between 1925 and 1967, alongside insurance companies and barristers. The architectural firm of Blackwell and Craig was also located in the building in 1949, and were the designers of some of Peterborough’s most notable structures. The firm, which is the longest continually running architectural firm in Canada, evolved into Craig, Zeidler and Strong in the 1960s; in 1962, the head offices of the firm moved to Toronto. The firm is now known as the Zeidler Partner Architects and has gone on to design such notable structures as the Toronto Eaton Centre and Ontario Place. 

The Bank of Toronto Building has good architectural value, despite various changes made to the façade over the years. originallyy a 4 storey building, the striking Second Empire details (including the mansard roof and corner tower) were removed in the 1920s. The remaining 3 storey building was pared down to a more somber Classical Revival style, with pilasters flanking the main entrance.

The Bank of Toronto Building has excellent contextual value as an anchor building to one of downtown Peterborough’s busiest intersections. The building continues the line of three storey facades running along both George and Hunter Streets.

ORIGINAL OWNER: John Thompson

ARCHITECT: unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1862

BUILDER: unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

A substantial 3-storey building at the southeast corner of George Street North and Hunter Street, this landmark structure is comprised of several commercial storefronts with rental units on the upper levels. It continues the rhythm of 3 storey Victorian commercial structures running along both sides of George Street and Hunter Street.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • The three storey structure withrounded corner
  • The cornice line of simple modillions
  • The fenestration, including:
    • Paired corner windows
    • Round and flat top window heads
    • 2/2 sash
  • Decorative cast medallions on first storey
  • The rear façade of the building, facing the back laneway

140 Hunter St W

Street Address: 140 Hunter Street West

Roll Number: 040100031000000

PIN Number: 281030046

Short Legal Description: PLAN 5 LOTS 3 AND 4 PT LOT 1 N OF HUNTER E OF GEORGE RP 45R12651 PART 1 IRREG 3068.91SF 39.00FR 78.69D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: December 2008

On Site Evaluation Date:

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: 2008

PACAC Application Approval Date: January 2009

Submission Date: November 2008

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

The property at 140 Hunter Street West has good cultural value as having been a photography studio since 1856. Built by James T. Henthorn in 1856, it was the photography studio of Peter H. Green until 1896 when it was taken over by Robert Maitland Roy and renamed the Roy Studio. The Roy Studio was leased since its construction, and finally owned by Fred Roy in 1920.

Home to three generations of Roy Studio photographers, the Roy Studio was where the nationally significant photographic collection of over 300,000 glass plate and film negatives was originallyy produced, many of which were portraits photographed within the third-storey studio, and they documented life in Peterborough on many different levels. The collection holds excellent cultural significance in its documentation of life, people and architecture of Peterborough through the decades, and provides an excellent opportunity for the reconstruction of Peterborough’s social history. The majority of photographs are credited to Fred Roy (1881-1950), which document not only Peterborough, but also Canada and Europe, winning national and international awards for his work until the 1920s.

This property is significant as the birthplace of the entire collection and home to almost a century of the Roy family and studio. Miranda Hume continues the tradition of photography at 140 Hunter Street, which began in 1856 with Peter H. Green and continued from 1896 to 1992 with the Roy family.

ORIGINAL OWNER: James T. Henthorn

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: Circa 1856 (renovated 1908 after fire)

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

The former Roy Studio is Located on the north side of Hunter Street West, set right at the sidewalk, and is surrounded by late 19th and early 20th century commercial buildings. According to Martha Kidd’s ‘Architectural History of Peterborough’, the building was part of a row of three constructed at the same time, but now appears to be separate due to renovations after a fire in 1908.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED: 

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • 3-storey brick structure
  • Original mosaic tiled floor with ‘The Roy Studio’ emblem in the main entrance vestibule
  • Decorative Cornice Mouldings and frieze detailing
  • Third-storey angled windows to provide light for photographic development
  • Front main entrance with angled storefront and door
  • Two second-storey double hung windows with leaded sash

221 London St

Street Address: 221 London Street

Roll Number: 040061050000000

PIN Number: 281060010

Short Legal Description: PT LT 6 W OF GEORGE ST. & S OF LONDON ST. PL 1 TOWN OF
PETERBOROUGH PTS 2 & 3 45R5652, T/W & S/T R624407; PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date: September 29, 2004

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Heritage - Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: September 2008

PACAC Application Approval Date: October 2008

Submission Date:

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

The property at 221 London Street was built in the late 1880s by an important Peterborough bricklayer, J.J. Hartley. Hartley built many of Peterborough’s finest homes during this era and lived in the neighbourhood of 221 London St for many years. He also built 217 London Street on the adjoining lot, and it was originallyy connected to this property by a carriage house in the rear. Upon completion, 221 London Street it was sold to Reverend G.H. Davis.

221 London Street is a good example of 1880s Victorian architecture with Italianate details such as the projecting two-storey bay and stylized classical elements. The builder, J.J. Hartley, was responsible for constructing several houses in the Peterborough area during this period. Moreover, the exterior of this house has remained in good condition, and little has been done to alter or compromise the integrity of the building.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Rev. G.H. Davis

ARCHITECT: J.J. Hartley

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1880-1887

BUILDER: J.J. Hartley

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

The house is located on the south side of London Street, just west of George Street, north of the downtown core. Set in an old residential neighbourhood, many of the surrounding properties are from the same era, and have similar features. The house to the east of 221 London Street is a mirror image of this building. As well, there are other historic buildings in the vicinity, including Trent University’s Scott House located at 300 London Street. 221 London is located in the centre of the lot. Though the house, originallyy a one-family home, has been subdivided into apartments, there is little outward evidence of this change.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • Solid yellow brick exterior walls
  • Fieldstone foundation
  • Projecting 2 storey bay
  • Hip roof
  • Original fenestration, including wooden frames, sills, segementally arched tops on the second storey, 2 over 2 sash windows, brick voussoirs and small second storey stained glass window, at the rear of the house.
  • Original soffits, boxed cornice and fascia
  • Main entrance, including sidelights, and stained glass transom
  • Stick style porch entrance, including all spindle-work, trelliage trim, square supporting posts, ceiling, fascia, and light fixture

410-412 George St N

Street Address: 410-412 George Street North

Roll Number: 040100072010000

PIN Number: 281030046

Short Legal Description: PT LOT 3 TO PT LOT 4 N OF HUNTER E OF GEORGE AM412 IRREG 3100.00SF 38.09FR D

Owners’ Concurrence:

PACAC Application Review Date: December 2008

On Site Evaluation Date: June 28, 2004

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: 2008

PACAC Application Approval Date: January 2009

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

The property at 410-412 George Street North has good cultural heritage value in its association with early Peterborough developer, James T. Henthorn who owned and developed all of the property that stands north of Hunter Street and East George Street from the time he purchased it in 1827 until he died in 1877. In 1860, Henthorn’s original properties along George Street (these included a bakery, stable and shed) were destroyed by fire. After recovering from this disastrous fire, the building that now stands at 410-412 George Street was built. The “Crystal Block” contains all of the buildings on the east side of George Street, from the intersection of Brock Street to Hunter Street. Some of the oldest buildings in the city are contained within this block.

The 1865-66 Peterborough City Directory names the R. Johnston + Son dry goods store as being located in the vicinity of this building. By 1888, Mr. W.W. Johnston was the owner and operator of a dry goods business at 410 George Street. Mr. W.W. Johnston and his family were residents of 410 George Street from approximately 1865 to 1897.

Starting in 1922, 412 George Street was referred to as “The Crystal Apartments”, for which the sign is still visible, the reason being that the building is located next to “Crystal Theatre” which was once located at 408 George Street North. 410-412 George Street North was once home to the Boston Café and Porter’s Meat Market. Photos of the building and its interior are part of the Roy Studio Collection at the Peterborough Museum & Archives.

Ron Thom, Master Planning Architect, set up offices in Toronto and established a temporary field office at 412 George St from 1965 until 1968 while he was constructing Trent University. From this location his team of architects designed and built four buildings at Trent University, all of which have won international recognition and innumerable prizes and are among Canada’s foremost architectural masterpieces of Modernism. Thom’s Prairie style influences also appear in the design of the wooden door at 410-412 George Street North, which could possibly be one of his designs.

410-412 George Street North has good architectural value in its unique details such as decorative sash detailing on all cornice work, the central triangular adornment and original red brick façade from the 1902 reconstruction. The building also retains all three iron pilasters across its façade inscribed “W. Hamilton MFG. CO. Peterboro ON”, a business which existed in the late 1800-early 1900’s in Peterborough. The building also retains its original art deco style door with “Crystal Apartments inscribed in the upper transom of the north front door as a lasting legacy of its past.

ORIGINAL OWNER: James T. Henthorn

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1860 rebuilt after fire in 1902

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

Located in the north end of downtown Peterborough, 410-412 George Street North fits into the 19th century streetscape and continues the pattern of 3-storey brick commercial buildings, but stands out with a slightly higher cornice line and as one of the only red brick buildings on the block without segmented window surrounds. The building is likely to have contained three storefronts ever since it was constructed.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • 3 Storey rectangular massing
  • Extended cornice line
  • Solid brick construction
  • Original fenestration set in recessed masonry panels
  • The iron Pilasters on the street façade still read “W. Hamilton MFG. CO. Peterboro ON”. Hamilton’s business existed in the late 1800-early 1900’s
  • The name “Crystal” which still appears on the awning of the building
  • Triangle shaped design above the center window, which resembles a cornice return
  • Original brick work from the 1902 reconstruction
  • Unique geometric Prairie Style or West Coast Modern door, later addition possibly designed by Ron Thom

413 George St N

Street Address: 413 George Street North

Roll Number: 040060047000000

PIN Number: 281030031

Short Legal Description: PT LT 1 N OF HUNTER ST AND W OF GEORGE ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH AS IN R516306 (FOURTHLY DESCRIBED LANDS) T/W R516306; PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date: April 25, 2008

Evaluation Category: A

Evaluators: Susan Schappert

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION"

The property at 413 George Street North has excellent cultural heritage value. Built in 1866-68, it was originallyy established by William Lech, an immigrant from Prussia and son of a Prussian soldier. The William Lech & Sons Furrier was operated as a successful family furrier business from the date of construction until 2008, over 140 years. The building was complete with refrigeration and processing rooms, dealing extensively with the fur trade, wholesale and retail, from raw to manufactured fur products. The black bear, the classic Lech symbol, which had taken many forms throughout the business’ long history, is pictured on a plaque within the building. 

The building also has good architectural value as the only building in downtown Peterborough with ogee topped casement windows and wooden label surrounds. The Lech Building is a good example of a mid-block building on George Street. Its original front entrance and wooden door with decorative glass remain intact along with the mosaic–tiled floor with the bear emblem and 'Lech'.

The Lech Building also has good contextual value, continuing the pattern of 3-storey buildings on George Street. It retains its original red brick façade and storefront. It is a landmark building with its unusual ogee-shaped window openings, ogee-topped casement windows and wooden label surrounds, restored to their original condition and historic colour.

ORIGINAL OWNERs: William Cluxton, Robert Rowe

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1866-1868

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

Set in the downtown core on George Street North among similar Victorian commercial buildings and three storey facades that flank the building to the north and south. 413 George Street North continues the usual pattern of windows set between pilasters surmounted by a bracketed cornice. Recently restored, 413 George Street North stands out among other similar sized buildings with its unusual ogee topped casement windows and wooden label surrounds and a red brick facade. Rear access to the building is from Chambers Street, one of the interesting side-streets off the downtown. 

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trimp, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements: 

  • 3 storey brick exterior walls
  • Flat roof, sloping to the rear of the building
  • Fenestration, including ogee-topped window casement windows, wooden label surrounds
  • Main entrance, including mosiac-tiled floor with bear and 'Lech', wood door with decorative glass 

Interior Elements:

  • Main floor tin ceiling
  • Basement tin ceiling

425-427 George St N

Street Address: 425 George Street North

Roll Number: 040060051000000

PIN Number: 281030027

Short Legal Description: TOWN PLAN 1 PT LOT 1 S BROCK W GEO AM412 IRREG 3990.00SF 40.00FR D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: December 2008

On Site Evaluation Date: May 5, 2008

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: 2008

PACAC Application Approval Date: January 2009

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

The property at 425 George Street North has good cultural value in its association with Thomas Bradburn, a prominent figure in Peterborough’s early history and the largest individual landowner in Peterborough at the time of his death. The building is also significant for its long history of commercial occupants, having been occupied almost constantly since its construction.

The property itself was sold as one unit, and divided into smaller lots by William Chambers, for whom the rear side street is named. This three-storey brick building’s design is similar to other Bradburn buildings constructed during this period such as 379 George Street North, to the south.

425 George Street operated primarily as a commercial building with residential space above the stores, usually for the owners of the commercial enterprise and their families, as was typical of the early period of its existence. One of the earliest occupants was a confectionery store at 425 George Street ‘Leandre Potvin Confectionary’ owned and operated by Leandre Potvin for a period of approximately 30 years, who resided above the store for about twenty five years. Other occupants included Abraham Clegg Furniture and The Sons of England Club, along with residential dwellings on the upper floors for store owners and other citizens working in the area. The façade of the building usually contained two storefronts at any given time, being 425 and 427 George Street North. Adding ‘½’ to the address denoted apartments above.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Thomas Bradburn

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1870-1871

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:
Located on the main one-way thoroughfare coming into Peterborough from the north, 425 George Street North contributes to the 19th century streetscape of downtown Peterborough as a typical midVictorian commercial building. 425 George Street North is on a block with three other heritage buildings designated under the Ontario Heritage Act, all built in similar styles in approximately the same period, it continues the usual pattern of windows set between pilasters. While its roofline is slightly higher than its neighbours to the immediate north and south, it has a similar massing and is the same height as 419 George Street North, the Examiner Building, to the south. Its neighbour to the north has a more modern appearance, while some heritage features remain. Rear access to the building is from Chambers Street, one of the interesting side - streets of the downtown.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply
to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows,
chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone,
metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • Three-storey rectangular massing of the building
  • Flat roof
  • Stretcher bond construction
  • Original 2/2 sash fenestration on second and third-storey with segmented label surrounds on third storey
  • The window openings with radiating brick voussoirs, set in elongated brick recesses
  • Original wooden storefront with dental details on 427 George Street North facade

7 Engleburn Place

Street Address: 7 Engleburn Place

oll Number: 040110188000000

PIN Number: 281390022

Short Legal Description: PLAN 124 PT LOT 20 LOT 21 W PT LOT 21 E30' LOT 20 LESS E14' W24' S23' LOT 20 L-SHPD 0.09AC 50.00FR 80.00D; PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: May 2009

On Site Evaluation Date: November 7th, 2008

Evaluation Category: B: (61.2)

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: April 2009

PACAC Application Approval Date: May 2009

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

Built circa 1912, the 7 Engleburn Place, known as the Patrick D. Fitzgerald House has excellent cultural heritage value through its historical associations and well-preserved design and construction. The House was built on land that was formerly part of the Engleburn Estate, Reverend Mark Burnham’s 28-acre farm and its Classical Revival home built in 1853. In the first decade of the 20th century, the farm and estate lands were subdivided into the Engleburn Park lots, and Robert A. Elliot, local businessman and real estate agent, purchased lots 9-12 and built his home on the corner lot. Robert A Elliott sold the East ½ acre of the land to Mr. Patrick D. Fitzgerald, a shoemaker, in 1912. This is likely when the house was built.

While the house is a typical 2 ½ storey Edwardian period home, it has unique details that contribute to its architectural significance. The recessed main entrance with double arches was used as a pattern for new development in the area, which allowed for new homes to blend with the historic neighbourhood. The house also retains its original fenestration on all elevations.

The Patrick D. Fitzgerald House represents one of the first homes in Ashburnham built in a privately planned subdivision. Engleburn and the Absalom Ingram House represent the first period of development in the neighbourhood while this second era of development represents Peterborough during its growing industrial age and the expansion and prosperity that followed.

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1912

BUILDER: Unknown

Located in Peterborough’s old Ashburnham Village, the Fitzgerald House is located among mainly early to mid 20th century homes. A row of recent infill housing has used the recessed entrance arches seen on the Robert A. Elliott House and the Patrick D. Fitzgerald House in order to blend in with the historic streetscape.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features: 

Exterior Elements:

  • 2-½ storey exterior red brick walls on stone foundation
  • Hip roof with front wall gable and west wall gable, including cedar gable shingles
  • Original fenestration, including:
    • 6 over 1 sash with decorative glass
    • Single decorative glass panels
    • Cut stone sills
  • Recessed entrance arch on north elevation of house including wooden front door
  • Original wooden details including: railings on north and west elevations
  • 1 ½ storey coach house (portion within the lot area) with gable roof, including any remaining fenestration)

186 Aberdeen Ave

 Street Address: 186 Aberdeen Avenue

Roll Number: 50080131000000

PIN Number: 281170154

Short Legal Description: PLAN 101 LOT 26 AND PT OF LANE 0.17AC 70.00FR 106.00D 

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date: February 2008

Evaluation Category: B: (50)

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: April 2009

PACAC Application Approval Date: May 2009

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

Built in about 1894-95, the first owner of this house was Eliza Smyth, wife of James C. Smyth, a teacher at Central School.

186 Aberdeen, known as the Smyth House, was constructed on land formerly owned by Albert Edward Dixon and sold to Eliza Smyth in 1893. The architectural significance of this house lies in the overall preservation of its unique details, typical of the Edwardian style. Details include the front porch with pedimented columns, and a plain architrave and squared enclosed porch on the second storey with wooden fish scale details (also visible on the third storey gable peak). Original fenestration and millwork remains intact within large, simply adorned window surrounds.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Eliza Smyth

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: c. 1895

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

Located in a residential neighbourhood, the Smyth House faces the street and is set among homes of similar age. Mature trees line the street. The Smyth House is larger than most homes on the street, which is located north of the downtown core in proximity to other streets with similar neighbourhoods. Located within the 1875 City limits, this property was part of the original City of Peterborough. 

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features: 

  • Red brick walls on stone foundation
  • Fish scale shingles on gable peak and second storey enclosed
  • porch/sunroom
  • Front porch with pedimented columns which supports a plain architrave and squared enclosed porch on the second storey
  • All fenestration
  • Simple dentil details below fish scaling of third storey peak
  • Portico, including:
    • Pediment
    • Ionic Columns
    • Stairs to main
      entrance
    • Main entrance
      and wooden
      front door

187 London St

Street Address: 187 London Street

Roll Number: 40061042000000

PIN Number: 281170154

Short Legal Description: TOWN PLAN 1 PT LOT 3 PT LOT 4 S
LONDON W GEO IRREG 0.25AC 56.42FR 191.42D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

On Site Evaluation Date: July 4 2008

Evaluation Category: B: (55.15)

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: May 2009

PACAC Application Approval Date: May 2009

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

Built Circa 1890 on land originallyy bought by James Hall via a patent from the Crown, 187 London Street is of cultural heritage value and significance in its association with the Dickson Mills neighbourhood and the Dickson Mills Lumber Company. Its first owner and occupant, George Hilliard, was a former Peterborough M.P with a strong involvement in the lumber business in Peterborough throughout its early history. 

The property at 187 London Street, known as the George Hilliard House has excellent integrity of design and construction. The house features many characteristics of the Italianate style, including the projecting first storey bay window, stylized wooden details and carved cornice brackets. The exterior of this building has remained in good condition and little has been done to alter or compromise its integrity. All original millwork remains intact.

ORIGINAL OWNER: George Hilliard

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1890

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

The house, built in a style suited to Peterborough’s upper middle class, is located on the south side of London Street and set in an old residential neighbourhood near the former Dickson Mills Lumber Company. Many of the surrounding properties are from the same era, are of similar size and have similar features.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features: 

Exterior Elements:

  • Red brick construction
  • Fieldstone foundation
  • Hip roof
  • Projecting 1st storey bay with wooden cornice brackets and wooden soffits and fascia over windows
  • Original fenestration, including wooden frames, sills, segmentally arched tops on the second storey, 2 over 2 sash windows, brick voussoirs and wooden rope moulding around all first storey windows, French windows on first storey with 3 over 4 sash, and 4 over 4 sash with transom of six individual panes in second storey sunroom.
  • Original fish scale detailing under sunroom portion of second storey
  • Original soffits, boxed cornice and fascia

485 Bonaccord St

Street Address: 485 Bonaccord Street

Roll Number: 030010055000000

PIN Number: 281170154 

Short Legal Description: PLAN 34 PT LOT 53 IRREG 0.25AC 57.00FR 187.42D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: May 2009

On Site Evaluation Date: November 2008

Evaluation Category: B : (59.39)

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: April 2009

PACAC Application Approval Date: May 2009

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

Built circa 1876, 485 Bonaccord Street, known as the Spence Cottage, has excellent cultural heritage value in its association with well-known Peterborough citizens in the 19th century, and its well-preserved design and construction.

The Spence Cottage at 485 Bonaccord Street was built on a lot that was once part of land owned by the Revered John Morris Rodger, a Presbyterian minister from Scotland who arrived in Canada in 1833. An Article in the Peterborough Examiner from 1853 stated that Reverend Rodgers built the first stone house in Peterborough on this lot. The Reverend’s strong involvement in the community led to many enduring projects such as St. Andrew’s Church, which still stands.

The Spence Cottage is an excellent example of Gothic Revival Style Cottage. The 1 ½ storey structure with its dichromatic brick details, quoins and voussoirs over the front door and first storey windows and central gable peak are all characteristics of this style.

ORIGINAL OWNER: John Spence

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1876

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

Located within the 1875 City limits, this property was part of the original City of Peterborough. 485 Bonaccord was built on property originallyy owned by the Reverend J.M Roger, where he built ‘Cordach’ as his home. The land was later subdivided into the current lots. The house is set close to the street, typical of this era and surrounded by houses of similar scale.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • Red brick walls
  • Quoins at corners of walls house in sand coloured brick
  • Sand coloured brick voussoirs over first storey windows
  • Remaining wooden shutters
  • Low hip roof with center gable wall dormer
  • Brick chimneys on east and west elevations
  • Soffits and fascia
  • Stone Foundation
  • Main entrance
    • Door
    • Transom
  • Fenestration
    • Semi-segmented 2/2 sash wooden window at centre of gable wall dormer
    • Remaining 2/2 sash wooden windows and semi-segmented wooden window surrounds

Interior Elements:

  • Two Interior plaster medallions- one simple and one intricately moulded

512-514 College St

Street Address: 512-514 College Street

Roll Number: 040100157000000

Pin Numer: 284840087 

Short Legal Description: PT 5 TO 6 S MC DONNEL E WATE N36' S139.67' LOT 5 N36' S139.67' W26.33' LOT 6 IRREG 0.09AC 36.00 FR 100.00D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

On Site Evaluation: January 2006

Evaluation Category: B: (66.45)

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: April 2009

PACAC Application Approval Date: May 2009

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

Built by George Malloch between 1830 and 1850, 512-514 College Street has excellent cultural heritage value as a wellpreserved example of vernacular housing in the historically significant neighbourhood that developed around the Dickson Mills Lumber Company. The house was divided into two separate units (512 and 514) in the 1880s and was bought and sold many times over the years.

512-514 College Street has integrity of construction and design as an example of stacked plank construction, a technique that utilized second grade lumber not suitable for export. Stacked plank building was popular during Peterborough’s lumbering heyday in the mid nineteenth century. The design of the house is an interpretation of Regency style, popular between 1820 and 1860. Characteristics of this style consist of a square or rectangular base, low hip roof, and an emphasis on symmetry, all of which are seen in 512-514 College Street. While the interior of the house was divided into two separate apartments, the exterior remains intact. This type of architecture was common in Canada until the arrival of railways in the mid-19th century. The design and construction of this building and others built in this style were based on traditional or regional forms, and depended widely on locally available materials. 

ORIGINAL OWNER: George Malloch

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1830-1850

BUILDER: Unknown 

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

The property at 512-514 College Street has excellent contextual value in its location in the Dickson Mills neighbourhood and fits into the 19th century residential streetscape of modestly scaled 1 ½ and 2-torey houses. This neighbourhood emerged when Samuel Dickson started the Dickson Mills Lumber Company, which became a prosperous business on the banks of the Otonabee River.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

Thee Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscaping features. 

Exterior Elements:

  • Gable-end roof
  • Original soffits and fascia
  • Stacked plank construction
  • Fenestration, including:
    • Original double hung sash windows
    • Pedimented surrounds
    • Original fenestration of enclosed middle section of front porch
  • Original, one-storey partially enclosed porch on front façade, including:
    • Columns
    • Low hip roof
    • Symmetrical design
  • Main entrance including:
    • Enclosed middle section of front porch
    • Doors on either side
    • Split sidewalk leading up to separate entrances

 

Mount St. Joseph (1545 Monaghan Rd)

Street Address: 1545 Monaghan Road

Roll Number: 020130002000000

PIN Number: 280630108

Short Legal Description: PT LT 12 CON 13 (NORTH MONAGHAN), AS IN Q2167, Q9730 & Q4244; LTS 1 TO 9 PL 7Q (NORTH MONAGHAN); LYING E OF PT 1 45R7803, EXCEPT PTS 1 & 2 45R7174, PTS 1, 2, 4 & 5 45R8856 & PTS 7 & 8 45R3089; S/T R525784, R546220 & R546219; EXCEPT T/W IN Q9730 & Q8148

Owners’ Concurrence: Unknown

PACAC Application Review Date: April 2006

On Site Evaluation Date: June 13, 2005

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Heritage

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: August 2005

PACAC Application Approval Date: May 2006

Submission Date: December 2008

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

Mount St. Joseph has historical value as the first convent motherhouse in Peterborough, and also the fourth motherhouse of the Sisters of St. Joseph to be established in Canada.

The first congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph in the Peterborough area arrived in the 1890’s with the task of administering St. Joseph’s Hospital. Proper residential facilities were needed in Peterborough and the Sisters subsequently bought a farmhouse, Inglewood, and its ten-acre property in 1894 for the sum of $ 6,350.00. originallyy the home of David G Halton, local police magistrate in the late 1860s, Inglewood was put up for sale by Halton, and was the home of the Sherwood family of Peterborough until 1893.

Mount St. Joseph has historical value through the activities of the Sisters of St. Joseph who lived and worked at the Mount while integrating themselves into the medical and educational communities of Peterborough. Of especial value is their work with St. Joseph’s Hospital and the Peterborough Separate School Board.

The Sisters of St. Joseph administered the operation of the former St. Joseph’s Hospital from 1890 to 1988. When St. Joseph’s Hospital was established it was the only local area hospital willing to take Catholic patients. In 1906 the Sisters of St. Joseph opened a nursing school at St. Joseph’s Hospital, which became one of the foremost nurse training schools in the area. The Sisters of St. Joseph have seen St. Joseph’s Hospital through many times of crisis in the Peterborough community, including the Quaker Oats Fire of 1916 and the Spanish Influenza outbreak of 1918.

The Sisters of St. Joseph is also a teaching order, and the Sisters taught at many elementary and secondary schools in the separate school board until the late 1970s. They have also operated two schools, St. Mary’s, a day and boarding school, and St. Cecilia’s Music Centre. The Sisters of St. Joseph have continued to provide private academic and musical tutoring at Mount St. Joseph since 1970.

Mount St. Joseph is a good example of a combination of vernacular and ecclesiastical convent architecture in Peterborough. Since the Sisters of St. Joseph took possession of Inglewood and its surrounding property, the building has been renovated five times: in 1904, 1911, 1933, 1952 and 1967. The original Inglewood farmhouse that now makes up the core of Mount St. Joseph has been altered as ecclesiastical architectural elements have been introduced into the design. Highlights of the building include the 1911 addition of a corner domed tower. The rare Classical Revival porch added on to the northern wing and Inglewood core facades are essential to the heritage character of the building. The building also contains Gothic Revival stained glass windows in the chapel.

Mount St. Joseph has good contextual value in its prominent presence on the northern Monaghan Road landscape. The buildings occupy fifteen landscaped acres at the corner of McDonnel Street and Monaghan Road. The winding front driveway is lined with eighteen sugar and silver maple trees. The front lawn has a cedar privacy hedge that stretches from the driveway to the southern end of the property at Woodland Street. 

Mount St. Joseph has been a private home, a Motherhouse, a teaching centre and a spiritual retreat during its lifetime. The building is physical evidence of the historical importance of the Sisters of St. Joseph to Peterborough. Mount St. Joseph is an interesting example of the combination of vernacular and ecclesiastical architecture, and the treelined grounds and winding driveway emphasize its prominence in the local
landscape.

ORIGINAL OWNER: David G. Halton

ARCHITECT: unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1869

BUILDER: unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

Mount St. Joseph is located west of Monaghan Road at the corner of McDonnel and Monaghan Road. It is situated between Woodland Street and Middleton Drive. Just west of Bonner-Worth Park, Mount St. Joseph is located on fifteen acres that border on to the St. Peter’s Secondary School property. 

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features: 

Exterior Elements:

  • Original buff brick exterior walls of Inglewood, and subsequent buildings and additions dating from 1904, 1911 and 1933
  • Corner tower with rounded top dome
  • All fenestration, including:
    • Decorative brickwork surrounds, some with rounded tops and/or quoins
    • Any remaining original windows
    • All arched top stained glass windows in the auditorium and chapel wings
    • All dormer windows, including any remaining decorative brackets
  • The two-storey Classical Revival porch on the Inglewood and northern wing facades, including:
    • Railings
    • Ionic columns
  • All roofs, including:
    • Hip roof on main building and chapel
    • Gabled wall dormers
    • Eaves and fascia
  • Original “Inglewood” double transom doorway 

Interior Elements:

  • All decorative ceilings, including:
    • Tin ceilings
    • Oak ceiling in the Spirituality Centre meeting room
  • All transom doorways in the Inglewood and Northern wings
  • Open oak staircase with newel posts in the Inglewood wing.
  • Inglewood wing entrance-way with dentil crown mouldings
  • Palladian stained glass window
  • All French Ornate radiators
  • All marble fireplaces
  • All decorative work in the chapel including stained glass, columns, and woodwork etc.
  • All decorative moulding in the auditorium

64 Hunter St W

Street Address: 64 Hunter Street W

Roll Number: 040100024000000

Short Legal Description: PT 6 N HUNTER E WATER REG 5208.00SF 54.82FR 95.00D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date: May 22, 2008

Evaluation Category: B (56.35)

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

The building at 64 Hunter Street has good cultural and heritage value in its association with prominent early citizens of Peterborough. It is constructed on the site of the former British Wesleyan Methodist Church, later demolished. The land was later owned by Mr. Walter Sheridan. Sheridan was born in 1796 in the County Carlow, Ireland and became an architect and the first clerk of the county of Peterborough in 1844. Sheridan Street, to the west of the property, was named after him. An earlier house was built on the site and was demolished before Mr. Walter Nesbitt purchased the land and built the present house in 1879.

Due to its proximity to St. John’s Anglican Church, 64 Hunter Street was also home to Rev. Canon John C. Davidson (later Archdeacon) of the Church before the Rectory at St. John’s was constructed.

The building has good architectural and design value. 64 Hunter Street was designed by noted Peterborough architect and City engineer John Belcher. Belcher designed some of Peterborough’s most prominent buildings; Market Hall, the Morrow Building and The Carnegie Library (now part of City Hall) are all credited to him. There are examples of similar homes designed by Belcher throughout the City, mostly in close proximity to the downtown core. All of these homes are in the Italianate style, which was very in Ontario during the 1870s. The homes were typically constructed for the upper middle class. The Peterborough Examiner of 1880 announced that the house was finished and was “Complete with bath, gas, etc. Builder Mr. John Alford. J. E. Belcher, Architect.” Although not the original, the front porch has been rebuilt to reflect the original features of the building. A back addition was also constructed in a sympathetic manner.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Mr. Walter Nesbitt

ARCHITECT: John E. Belcher

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1879-1883

BUILDER: Mr. John Alford

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

This home is located next to the Hunter Street Bridge, on the west side of the Otonabee River. The building is set among a mixture of 19th century commercial and residential buildings, lending it an eclectic neighbourhood composition. Quaker Oats is located next to the building on the east bank of the Otonabee. To the north is the County Courthouse and the Dixon Mills neighbourhood, an early Peterborough development around the old Dickson Mills Lumber Company that once operated on the Otonabee before Quaker came to Peterborough. The downtown core is immediately to the west of the building. It would have been an ideal location with easy access to both the City of Peterborough and the Village of Ashburnham and in close proximity to all amenities and employment. It is situated in close proximity to St. John’s Anglican Church and Rev. Canon John C. Davidson (later Archdeacon) of St. John’s Anglican Church also lived in this house for a period of time in the late 1800s before the Rectory at St. John’s was constructed. 

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • Two storey buff brick construction
  • Low hipped roof
  • Two-storey front bay windows
  • All original 2/2 sash windows with segmented upper windows and voussoirs
  • Jack arches above lower window openings
  • Original painted wooden front door facing south onto Hunter Street with arched oblong windows and matching sidelights and transom with painted wood surrounds
  • Front porch with low pitched roof with supported by carved wooden columns
  • Boxed cornice
  • Soffits and fascia
  • Large original brick chimney on north west side

597-599 Water St

Street Address: 597-599 Water Street

Roll Number:

597 Roll: 040090074000000

599 Roll: 040090075000000

PIN Number:

Short Legal Description:

597: PLAN 63 PT LOT 2 S DUBLIN E GEO IRREG 0.07AC 27.00FR 81.00D 

599: PLAN 63 PT LOT 2 S DUBLIN E GEO E OF ABOVE DESC PCL IRREG 0.04AC 23.75FR D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date: May 22, 2008

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: March 2010

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

The house at 597-599 Water Street is a good example of a Georgian style duplex. Constructed circa 1870-75, the house was built on land owned by Dr. George Burnham Sr. who purchased the land in 1854 from William Bell, who owned it via a patent from the Crown in 1843. Some characteristic elements of the Georgian style include a symmetrical façade, muted details and very simple appearance. This style came to Canada with the British settlers and was a reflection of the simple dignity they wished to portray through their homes. The front porches, one ornate and one unadorned, and back portions to both sides of the duplex are all original features of the house which was always intended to be a duplex rental unit.

Dr. George Burnham Sr. was a very important figure in early Peterborough. He was born in Cobourg and came to Peterborough in 1836 to set up a medical practice in his house. He served the community for over forty years as medical doctor and as superintendent of the local school board, the first school inspector and as a charter member of the Peterborough Masonic Lodge.

Throughout its history it was used as a rental unit, attracting mostly middle class merchants, lawyers, construction workers, carpenters and a doctor who used 597 as his medical practice while inhabiting 599. In 1875 Peterborough experienced an industrial revolution that not only attracted major industries but also expanded local industries that led to a large increase in the workforce and the diversity of business in Peterborough. The need for rental housing in close proximity to the downtown and the variety of occupations of this duplex over the years attests to this early period of growth.

ORIGINAL OWNER: George Burnham Sr.

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1870

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

The setting of the duplex is very important as it relates to its use as a duplex rental unit. Located in close proximity to the downtown core, it was an ideal family home for middle class citizens and the history of occupants reinforces this as most tenants were middleclass workingmen such as carpenters, tailors, lawyers and their families and included among them one doctor, Dr. Eugene Snider who set up a practice in 597 while living at 599 from 1939 to 1945.

Located at the corner of Dublin and Water Streets, this home would have had an excellent view of the Otonabee River, which was an important element in Georgian architecture in Ontario. In addition to the view of the water, there was a park directly across from it on Dublin Street in the 1870s.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • 2-storey red brick construction in stretcher bond style
  • Jack arches above all windows
  • Fenestration including 2/2 and 6/6 wooden sash
  • Pairs of wooden shutters flanking windows
  • Medium pitch hipped roof
  • Both east facing verandas and wooden details including railing and balusters on both sides, original on 599 and a later, more intricately designed veranda on 597.
  • Wide corniceline
  • Red brick cornice bracket style brickwork under roofline

651 Gilmour St

Street Address: 651 Gilmour Street

Roll Number: 020100068000000

PIN Number:

Short Legal Description: PLAN 169 LOT 6 TO 7 IRREG 0.27AC 100.33FR D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

On Site Evaluation Date: June 15, 2009

Evaluation Category: A (74)

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

The property at 651 Gilmour Street holds good heritage and cultural value in its association with the Campbell and Hatton families and intact early twentieth century interior features.

651 Gilmour Street is an interpretation of the Edwardian style with large window openings a plain architrave above the columns that support the porch. Under the soffit of the roof, a similar plain frieze board echoes this architrave. Edwardian style homes usually show their grandeur through their front entrances, in this case the front porch, which wraps around the entire south elevation of the house that once faced Charlotte Street. This is no longer seen from the street since Charlotte Street has been developed and newer homes have been constructed to the south of 651 Gilmour Street. This serves as a reminder that the lot was a generous, somewhat secluded lot at the outer limits of the city, then part of the Township of North Monaghan. The interior of the home, refinished after the fire of the early 1900s, still contains all of its original features including all fireplaces, wooden staircase and pocket doors separating rooms.

The original home on this site was destroyed by fire c.1890. It was built by James Campbell and named ‘Walkerfield’. The home was rebuilt only to burn again, this time only on the inside, in the early 1900s.

The original owner of the home, James Campbell, was president of the West Riding Agricultural Society, which represented the agricultural interests of Peterborough. Campbell was also a general merchant on Hunter Street and in the 1860s, the Examiner advertised “Gooderham and Worts whiskey as well as superior brandies and wines for “medical purposes” as some of his merchandise. George Hatton, the second owner of the house was the son of the late David George Hatton, Police Magistrate of Peterborough. The home was granted to George W. Hatton, a Peterborough lawyer, in the will of James Campbell. It was left to him and his wife, Ella, Campbell’s daughter.

ORIGINAL OWNER: James Campbell

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: Rebuilt after fire c.1890

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

Located at the top of Gilmour Street, this home holds a prominent location that would have had a large vantage point overlooking the city. Once among fields and the outer limits of the city, the home originallyy had an address on Charlotte Street before the land was annexed and subdivisions were added. The site and setting of the home tell an interesting story about the development of the city, and former outer limits of the city of Peterborough.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • Brick construction laid in Flemish Bond pattern
  • High pitched gable roof
  • False timbering on third storey (NSEW)
  • Symmetrical façade
  • Original fenestration
  • Wrap-around veranda on south side (which was originallyy the front facing Charlotte Street) with low-pitched roof including dentil details and ornate ionic capitals with turned balusters plain architrave above the columns supporting the porch.
  • Original wooden soffits and fascia with a plain frieze board echoing the architrave of the veranda.

Interior Elements:

  • Original fireplaces including decorative tile and intricately carved wood surrounds
  • Original coffered wooden staircase
  • Original wooden newels and balusters
  • Original trim throughout the house
  • Pocket doors between rooms on main floor
  • Wooden plank floors
  • Wooden trim details surrounding windows on interior, including shutters
  • Original coffer-style panelling in main entrance
  • Decorative glass in entrance

788 Aylmer St N

Street Address: 788 Aylmer Street North

Roll Number: 050080210000000

PIN Number:

Short Legal Description: PLAN 101 LOTS 19 TO 21AND PART CLOSED LANE 0.53AC 112.00FR 208.00D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date: July 2009

Evaluation Category: A (70.25)

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type:Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: March 2010

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

788 Aylmer Street was built on land originallyy owned by William Sr. and later his son John Dixon, some of the first colony settlers of the area. George and Emma Copping purchased the land in 1910 and the house at 788 Aylmer Street North was completed in 1912.

The property at 788 Aylmer Street North has excellent cultural and heritage value as an Arts & Crafts style home built for an upper class family from Toronto. The builders and first owners of the property, George and Emma Copping, were originallyy from Toronto where George was president of the Reliable Knitting Company, which was founded in 1911 (and closed in 2006 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin), was the head of the firm George R. Copping and Sons, and had an address at 72 South Drive in Toronto’s south Rosedale neighbourhood. His immediate neighbour was William Moffat, chief inspector of the Imperial Bank of Canada. Copping may have belonged to the Royal Canadian Yacht Club, as it appears that his wife was chairman of the grounds committee, and he took part in lawn bowling. It is likely that 788 Aylmer Street North was the couple’s ‘country home’, which was very popular with upper class Torontonians, and it was quite easily accessible by rail at the time.

The Arts & Crafts style was popular in the early 20th century until about 1930, in Canada. The movement was founded by English poet William Morris and began as a reaction to the mass-produced qualities and decoration of the Victorian movement and the reliance on industrial machines, which he found ‘dehumanizing’. The Arts & Crafts movement put an emphasis on the hand made, and the importance of the skilled craftsman. It re-introduced an esthetic of pre-industrialization that was much more in tune with nature. This movement began in England in the 1870s and made its way to America and later to Canada.

Arts & Crafts buildings seen in Toronto were widely influenced by the English movement, which was popular with affluent members of society. By the time this style reached Canada, it focused on designing buildings intrinsically linked to their natural surroundings and oriented to take full advantage of the movement of the sun. Entrances were typically recessed and hidden under covered porches. The house at 788 Aylmer Street is two and half stories high and of red brick and painted wooden shingles and conveys an earthy, “homemade” feel. The house is quite large but eminates the presence of a small cottage with its long horizontal pane, reminiscent of a bungalow, and its built-in architectural features such as cabinets, shelves and seats. It has a long sloping roof that sweeps down to cover the deep wraparound verandah with broad supports and an understated entranceway. The deep eaves and exposed rafter ends are also a trademark of the Arts & Crafts, or Craftsman Style. The house is situated far back from the road, making the informal garden and large trees the focal point of the western façade of the house, giving it a secluded appearance.

ORIGINAL OWNER: George Copping

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1912

BUILDER:

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING: 

788 Aylmer Street North is located on a large lot in a quiet sub-division in close proximity to the downtown core of Peterborough. Located near many other residential homes of similar age and scale, this building fits in well with the neighbourhood and contributes to the overall historic landscape of the area. The building is west facing and its position orients toward the informally landscaped yard and large trees.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:
The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • 2 ½ -storey brick structure
  • Medium pitch hipped roof with long slope over porch
  • Wooden shingle exterior, painted
  • Original fenestration including:
    • All original wooden windows and sashes
    • Original window openings on all storeys
    • Large set of west facing windows
    • Covered porch with discreet entrance facing walkway and informal garden
      with built in elements

Interior Elements:

  • Main staircase at west entrance of the house
  • Stained glass windows at top of first staircase
  • Fireplace in living room on main floor of house with semi-circular front and egg and dart details
  • Original wood flooring throughout
  • Original kitchen pantry off main kitchen
  • Original wooden pocket doors on main floor (2 sets)
  • Coved plaster ceilings on main floor
  • Original decorative radiators throughout
  • Original wood trim and house mouldings throughout

City Hall and Carnegie Library (500 George St N)

City Hall

Street Address: 500 George Street North

Roll Number: 040100089000000

PIN Number: 281060087

Short Legal Description: LT 1 E OF GEORGE ST. & N. OF MURRAY ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH; LT 2 E OF GEORGE ST & N OF MURRAY ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH; LT 1 E OF GEORGE ST & S OF MCDONNEL ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH; LT 2 E OF GEORGE ST & S OF MCDONNEL ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH.

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date:

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: April 2009

PACAC Application Approval Date:

Submission Date:

Objections Noted: N/A

Comments: Recommended by PACAC’s DSC

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

Built in 1951, City Hall has excellent architectural value. It was designed by the architectural firm of Marani and Morris of Toronto and constructed with help from a bequest from the estate of W.G. Morrow. A former mayor of Peterborough, Morrow instructed that money be set aside to build an official City building. Up until that time there had never been a building dedicated solely to the affairs of the municipality. Premier Leslie Frost laid the cornerstone December 1, 1950 and City Hall was opened in October of 1951 by Ottawa mayor Charlotte Whitton and the mayor of Peterborough, England.

The building has been in use by the Corporation of the City of Peterborough since its opening. It has been the centre for many important community events and is an integral part of the civic centre of the City. At one time the building housed courts, the Justice of the Peace, the police department including the jail and the Board of Education.

Architecturally, City Hall is a late interpretation of the principles of the City Beautiful movement, which grew out of the European Beaux Arts style and borrowed from it a sense of order, harmony and dignity of design. The movement became popular after the Chicago World Exposition of 1892 and was explicitly linked to the beautification of a city in hope of inspiring the community to a moral and civic virtue. The building also offers a link between Confederation Square and Victoria Park.

The central portico of the City Hall building contains three door openings and simple concrete door surrounds, transoms and pediments. Above the main entranceway is a clock tower and octagonal belvedere tower topped by a gold dome and weathervane. The ground floor foyer at City Hall is adorned with a terrazzo mosaic floor map of Peterborough County, believed to be the only one of its kind in Canada.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Corporation of the City of Peterborough

ARCHITECT: Marani and Morris of Toronto

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1950-1951

BUILDER: Eastwood Construction

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

City Hall is included in, and is an integral part of downtown Peterborough’s Civic precinct. On the north side of McDonell Street is George Street United Church, and to the west is Confederation Square. To the north and now attached as an annex to City Hall is the former Carnegie Library built in 1910-11. Parking is at the east side of the building and east across Water Street are the Peterborough Lakefield Community Police Services, St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church, Victoria Park and the Peterborough County Courthouse.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements: 

  • 2 ½ storey sandstone cladding over steel frame construction with second storey flat roof and east chimney
  • Asymmetrical design
  • Central 2 ½ storey portico with clock tower and belvedere tower flanked on either side by two storey wings.
  • Two storey window recesses spaced at even intervals across the span of each of the two wings.
  • 2 storey east wing
  • Main entrance to the building including:
    • Original portico with three sets of doors, flanked by sandstone pilasters,
    • Simply designed door surrounds, stone pediments, transoms
    • Second storey fenestration in portico
    • Mansard roof with clock tower and belvedere tower with dome and weathervane

Interior Elements:

  • Original marble terrazzo tiled floor depicting a map of Peterborough County, including brass inlay
  • Original cornerstone of building, dated December 1, 1950 located in City Hall foyer, west wall
  • Marble interior pilasters and entrance staircase, and staircases leading to basement and second floor
  • Original ceiling moulding in entrance foyer
  • Brass details on banisters in entrance foyer up to second floor of City Hall and leading from first level foyer to basement level. 
  • Oak doors of Council Chambers, including wooden coffer-style details and pediments facing into the Chambers.

Carnegie Library

Street Address: 500 George Street North

Roll Number: 040100089000000

PIN Number: 281060087

Short Legal Description: LT 1 E OF GEORGE ST. & N. OF MURRAY ST PL 1 TOWN OF

PETERBOROUGH; LT 2 E OF GEORGE ST & N OF MURRAY ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH; LT 1 E OF GEORGE ST & S OF MCDONNEL ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH; LT 2 E OF GEORGE ST & S OF MCDONNEL ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH.

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date:

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: September 2008

PACAC Application Approval Date: October 2009

Comments: Recommended by DSC to include City Hall

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

Built in 1910, the former Carnegie Library Building has excellent cultural and heritage value as one of only 125 Carnegie Libraries in Canada. Constructed using funds from the Andrew Carnegie Foundation, Peterborough’s Carnegie Library was built during Peterborough’s prosperous years in the first decades of the new century, with a rapidly growing population of more than 16,000. Additional funding was donated to the City from the estate of Charlotte Nicholls, one of early Peterborough’s most prominent benefactors. The building represents a growing public awareness of the importance of libraries as educational institutions, and has value as a monument to public education and the increasing importance of literacy. The building also housed the Victoria Museum collection, which was the first museum collection in Peterborough. Now part of Peterborough City Hall, the Carnegie building continues to serve a civic purpose today. 

The building style of the Carnegie building closely resembles other educational institutions built in Peterborough in the same period, such as the former Peterborough Normal School and the Peterborough Collegiate and Vocational Institute across Confederation Square. Local architect and City engineer, John E. Belcher, designed the structure in the Beaux Arts style, with an eclectic mix of Renaissance and Classical features.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Corporation of the City of Peterborough

ARCHITECT: John E. Belcher

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1910-1911

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

Now part of Peterborough’s City Hall, the Carnegie Library is included in a precinct of downtown Peterborough dominated by monumental civic buildings. To the north is George Street United Church, and to the west is Confederation Square. The City Hall building to the south is attached via a modern link. To the east lies parking and across Water Street, the Peterborough Lakefield Community Police Services and St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church. All of these buildings are similar in size, giving the area a consistently scaled streetscape.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • Red brick walls with on limestone foundation
  • Cornice line and brackets
  • Hip roof with gabled portico
  • All fenestration including the dimensions of the original window openings, sills and continuous decorative band forming window headers.
  • Brick pilasters with capitals and bases
  • Entrance portico, including:
    • Pediment
    • Ionic brick Columns
    • Stairs to main entrance
    • Main entrance

91 Langton St

Street Address: 91 Langton Street

Roll Number: 050110130000000

Short Legal Description: PLAN 14 BLK E PT LOTS 11,12 & 20 45R-5635 PARTS 1,3,4,6 & 7 CORNER 0.54AC 96.76FR D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: March 8, 2011

On Site Evaluation Date: January 2010

Evaluation Category: B (60.6)

Evaluators: Jennifer Patterson

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: February 25, 2011

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

91 Langton Street has good cultural heritage value. The structure was built on land originallyy owned by George Hilliard, a prominent land baron and Conservative Member of Parliament who was supported by John A. MacDonald. The original land was divided into twenty small lots and sold off in 1881, one of which was purchased by John C.
Higgins, carpenter, millwright, and sawyer. This property remained in the Higgins family until the 1970s. 

John C. Higgins was born in Ireland in 1839, and married Margaret Denver in 1870 in Ontario with whom he had one son and seven daughters. The 1891 census indicates that the Higgins used this house for boarders and seven family members.

91 Langton Street has architectural value as an example of a simple vernacular style Victorian era dwelling constructed of wood and covered in brick veneer on the top of a small hill overlooking the Otonabee River on what was then a rural landscape.

Of particular cultural heritage significance is the later addition to the house that is an example of innovation in building technique and materials in this area. According to an article in the Peterborough Examiner, dated 28 April 1958, John C. Higgins was contracted in 1904 to build two houses at 633 Aylmer Street North and on Water Street with Thomas Mckee and Fred Tuggey, two of the first in Peterborough to be constructed using concrete blocks. The cement was purchased exclusively from the Canada Cement mill in Lakefield, Ontario, which remained in business from 1901-1909. Mr. Higgins constructed an addition using the same concrete blocks for his own home in 1904-05.

ORIGINAL OWNER: John Higgins

ARCHITECT/BUILDER: Possibly John C. Higgins

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1888-9

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

originallyy known as 1045 Water Street, the address of the property was changed to 91 Langton Street in the 1970s. The property was part of Smith Township until 1900 when it was officially annexed into Peterborough. The property retains traces of its rural beginnings, with its large lot and front entrance facing the Otonabee River. Mature trees surround the house, and it backs onto a wooded area which still contains an old fence constructed of wood now weathered over time. 

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • Original wood frame construction with painted brick veneer
  • Solid concrete block addition on south elevation
  • Medium hip roof
  • Verandah with Eastlake style details (later addition)
  • Segmented arch window openings
  • Original wooden windows
  • Wooden sills and blinds
  • Original wooden fascia

191-195 London St

Street Address: 187 London Street

Roll Number: 040061042000000

PIN Number: 281170154

Short Legal Description: TOWN PLAN 1 PT LOT 3 PT LOT 4 S LONDON W GEO IRREG 0.25AC 56.42FR 191.42D

Owners’ Concurrence: YesP

ACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date: July 4 2008

Evaluation Category: B: (55.15)

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: May 2009

PACAC Application Approval Date: May 2009

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

Built Circa 1890 on land originallyy bought by James Hall via a patent from the Crown, 187 London Street is of cultural heritage value and significance in its association with the Dickson Mills neighbourhood and the Dickson Mills Lumber Company. Its first owner and occupant, George Hilliard, was a former Peterborough M.P with a strong involvement in the lumber business in Peterborough throughout its early history.

The property at 187 London Street, known as the George Hilliard House has excellent integrity of design and construction. The house features many characteristics of the Italianate style, including the projecting first storey bay window, stylized wooden details and carved cornice brackets. The exterior of this building has remained in good condition and little has been done to alter or compromise its integrity. All original millwork remains intact. 

ORIGINAL OWNER: George Hilliard

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1890

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

The house, built in a style suited to Peterborough’s upper middle class, is located on the south side of London Street and set in an old residential neighbourhood near the former Dickson Mills Lumber Company. Many of the surrounding
properties are from the same era, are of similar size and have similar features.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features: 

Exterior Elements:

  • Red brick construction
  • Fieldstone foundation
  • Hip roof
  • Projecting 1st storey bay with wooden cornice brackets and wooden soffits and fascia over windows
  • Original fenestration, including wooden frames, sills, segmentally arched tops on the second storey, 2 over 2 sash windows, brick voussoirs and wooden rope moulding around all first storey windows, French windows on first storey with 3 over 4 sash, and 4 over 4 sash with transom of six individual panes in second storey sunroom.
  • Original fish scale detailing under sunroom portion of second storey
  • Original soffits, boxed cornice and fascia

349 Reid St

Street Address: 193-195 London Street

Roll Number: 040061044000000

Short Legal Description: TOWN PLAN 1 PT LOT 5 N MCDONNEL W GEO IRREG 0.25AC

57.00 FR 191.42D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date:

Evaluation Category: B (63.55)

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: February 25, 2011

PACAC Application Approval Date: March 8 2011

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

195 London Street has good architectural and historical value as an intact interpretation of the Italianate style in a semi-detached dwelling, with its characteristic two and a half-storey projecting bays flanking the façade of the building with steep gable roof over each, and decorative cornice brackets supporting the eaves on both sides. Its original exterior wooden details including identical front doors, window sills, fish scale design on gable ends of projecting bays and window surrounds also remain intact. The brick exterior of the building has been painted but overall it remains in excellent condition, retaining much of its original integrity. The central upper sunroom
features original stained glass upper lights on the original double hung sash windows and original decorative woodwork along its base.

The building was constructed to accommodate the families of prominent employees of the nearby lumber mills, John D. Baptie, owner of the J.D Baptie Planing Mill, located at 165-169 Dublin Street and the family of his brother-inlaw, Archibald Goodfellow. The planing mill was established in 1868 and was purchased by Mr. J.D Baptie in 1881
and renamed J.D Baptie Planing Mill. The mill produced large quantities of sash, doors, blinds, and other millwork used in area buildings during the construction boom that came with the rapid growth of the City from the 1880s to the early 1900s.

The factory produced large quantities of sash, doors, blinds, and other wood for construction purposes and played a significant role in the construction and adornment of this and other homes in this historic neighbourhood.

The property’s relationship to its community provides insights to the impact of the lumber industry in Peterborough. At the time of its construction, in the 1880s, Peterborough was a major exporter of lumber and many citizens were employed by the lumber mills. This home was well situated to be a tenement to the many workers of the mills and other surrounding businesses of downtown Peterborough.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Isabella Baptie

ARCHITECT/BUILDER: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1880s

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

The property at 195 London St. has excellent contextual value in its relationship to the community and provides insights into the economic and social impact of the lumber industry in Peterborough. At the time of its construction, in the 1880s, Peterborough was a major exporter of lumber in Canada. Many citizens were employed by the lumber mills including the Dickson Mill and J.D Baptie Planing Mill, both located within a few blocks of 195 London Street. The spacious semi-detached building was designed to house the families of prosperous businessmen. Significantly it is located within walking distance of the mills, in an area of similarly scaled homes, but outside the immediate vicinity of the mills. That less desirable area was populated by workers in smaller, less affluent, typically wood frame structures.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • Original two and a half storey painted brick construction with two and a half storey bays
  • Central upper sun room including:
    • Stained glass upper lights with geometrically patterned panes separated by wooden mullions;
    • wooden sash windows in central upper sun room;
    • decorative woodwork on window surrounds and frieze
  • Original wood details including:
  • decorative cornice brackets supporting the eaves on both projecting bays;
  • Identical front doors;
  • Exterior window sills and window surrounds;
  • Fish scale design on gable ends of projecting bays;
  • Original storm windows on east portion of building

416 Stewart St

Street Address: 416 Stewart Street

Roll Number: 030070070000000

Short Legal Description: TOWN PLAN PT LOT 11 N HUNTER W GEO REG 0.20AC 78.00FR 114.18D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date: December 8 2009

Evaluation Category: A (74)

Evaluators: Sue Schappert/Jennifer Patterson

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: February 25, 2011

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION: 

416 Stewart Street has excellent cultural heritage value through its historical associations and well-preserved design and construction. The home was built on land originallyy owned by James Hall, a wealthy land baron whose name is prominent in Peterborough’s political and industrial history as owner of one of the first tanneries along Jackson Creek, was Mayor of Peterborough in 1855 and a Member of Parliament from 1872-73.

416 Stewart Street has excellent cultural heritage value in the fact that it was the long time residence of Mr. Walter Paterson, a prominent businessman in one of Peterborough’s earliest industries. In 1875, Walter Paterson purchased the property at 416 Stewart Street from Charles Gow for $3500. Walter Paterson was a worker at the tannery owned by James Hall, established in the 1830s, located on Aylmer Street. Paterson worked for James Hall for 12 years before finally purchasing the entire company from his then employer in 1867, renaming it W. Paterson & Sons Tannery. Walter Paterson and his son, Walter Jr. worked as partners and the company’s buildings were located on Aylmer Street and consisted of more than one Acre of land (the large white brick Tannery building can be seen in this photo, courtesy of Trent Valley Archives). Their leather products were exported to Toronto and Montreal and according to the 1888-89 Peterborough City Directory, they manufactured 2,000 hides and 1,000 pelts per year. The main office for the tannery was located at 412 Aylmer Street, just two blocks from 416 Stewart Street, and the home was sold to Mr. C. B Routley in the 1890s, who owned a mercantile at 379 George Street at the time. 

The building at 416 Stewart has architectural value in its unique features adopted from a variety of styles that were popular at the time. The Italianate style is echoed in the bay on the south elevation of the building and small, intricately carved balconies, supported by decorative brackets leading to various tenant entrances. 

416 Stewart Street was divided into a number of apartments in the 1960s and has been rented to tenants over the years. The neighbourhood remains well kept, although most buildings are used as multi-residential rental units or for commercial purposes due to their size. The building at 416 Stewart is a landmark on the street and retains most of its original exterior features.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Mr. Charles Gow/Walter Paterson

ARCHITECT/BUILDER: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: c.1875

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

416 Stewart Street, The Walter Paterson House, is located within a historic streetscape
among homes of a similar style and scale. The street has retained its original character through time and is lined by mature trees and intact historic homes. Located within walking distance of Peterborough’s historic downtown core, the building was typically owned and inhabited by middle to upper class business owners. The property also backed onto Bethune Street which was dominated by rail tracks at one time. The neighbourhood was historically popular with prominent businessmen and merchants and the evidence of this fact is echoed in the scale and grandeur of houses in this area which are located in close proximity to churches and the homes of other prominent early citizens such as the Grover-Nicholls Estate, now used as the meeting hall for the Freemasons. Some prominent historic figures would have been neighbours of the house, including Wilhelm Lech of Lech Furriers which operated at 413 George Street North for over 140 years, whose home was located at 415 Stewart Street, directly across the street. 

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features: 

Exterior Elements:

  • Original 3-storey red-brick construction with decorative details including string courses, geometric brick patterns and gradation along front facing gable end
  • Stone foundation
  • Arch over recessed upper storey porch, including wooden balusters
  • Two and half storey brick bay on south elevation
  • Balconies at various levels supported by decorative brackets including balusters
  • Recessed front entrance arch
  • Original entrance door facing Stewart Street
  • Steep hip roof with dormers and brick chimneys
  • Original wooden details including bargeboards
  • Fenestration and wooden window surrounds and sills
  • Original wooden soffits and fascia

583 Harvey St

Street Address: 583 Harvey Street

Roll Number: 040090115000000

Short Legal Description: PT 2 S DUBLIN E WATER REG 0.08AC 29.08FR 114.17D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: March 8, 2011

On Site Evaluation Date:

Evaluation Category: B (56.05)

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: February 25, 2011

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

583 Harvey Street has historical and architectural value. Constructed in 1875 by William Thornton, a merchant and builder in Peterborough, it was the family home and remained in the Thornton family for over 100 years and surrounded by two other houses built by William Thornton ( 581& 585)581 is said to have been the first home to be built on Harvey Street.

583 Harvey Street is a well-preserved example of a vernacular one and a half storey home from the late 19th century. The home features an intricately carved verandah at the front of the simple one and a half storey house clad entirely in stucco, the earliest form of sheathing.

The veranda of 583 Harvey Street has excellent value as an intact Victorian verandah with details and intricate scrollwork reminiscent of the Eastlake style which was popular at the time. This is significant in its association with skilled craftsmen and their availability during this time period. According to Martha Kidd, craftsmen were settling into this area in the mid to late 1800s to build their homes and establish workshops. The lumber mill was an obvious draw and the neighbourhood’s appearance and early inhabitants reflect its early successes.

The location of the building is also very significant in relation to its first owner and inhabitant, listed in the census as a merchant and a builder. In the days preceding the automobile, it was understandably common to live in close proximity to the workplace, and this particular neighbourhood’s development is testament to this notion.

ORIGINAL OWNER: William Thornton

ARCHITECT/BUILDER: William Thornton

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: c. 1875

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

The home at 583 Harvey Street is located just a few blocks from Peterborough’s downtown core in a historic residential neighbourhood that developed in the 19th century around the Dickson Lumber Mill. The property, located between London and McDonnel Streets fits in well with the heritage character of the streetscape which features a variety of one and two storey dwellings constructed of brick or frame covered in stucco.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • Original one and a half storey frame construction, covered in stucco
  • Gable end roof with open eaves
  • Original window openings
  • Original wooden verandah with roof and intricately carved and painted details, an interpretation of the Eastlake style
    • Ornamental balusters across top of verandah
    • Ornamental brackets in top corners of verandah
  • Original wooden front door
  • Wooden addition

601 Gilmour St

Street Address: 601 Gilmour Street

Roll Number: 020100058000000

Short Legal Description: PLAN 144 LOT 16 IRREG 0.13AC 50.00FR 107.37D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

On Site Evaluation Date: December 8 2009

Evaluation Category: B (68.45)

Evaluators: Jennifer Patterson

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV Designation Brief Completion Date: February 25, 2011

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

Built on land originallyy owned by James Campbell, this property has good cultural heritage value. The land that 601 Gilmour Street now occupies was once part of a very large tract of farmland that spanned toward Charlotte Street and contained a large farmhouse. When prominent lawyer Elias Burnham died in 1890, his property which was bounded by Park, King, Charlotte & Monaghan (which was then Boundary Rd.) was laid out to become the “Avenues”, then Peterborough’s largest suburban area. 601 Gilmour was constructed just west of Monaghan, on the corner, just outside of the “Avenues” area as it was originallyy laid out, and it was the first house to be constructed on the south side of Gilmour west of Monaghan, it was originallyy part of Monaghan Township until official annexation as part of Peterborough in 1928.

In June of 1913, an indenture was made between the Hamilton Realty Company (which owned this and other lots on Gilmour Street) and Willoughby Ellis and the City of Peterborough which allowed the lots to become part of the City. Frederick L. Roy, of the famous Roy Photographic Studios, purchased the land from the Hamilton Realty Company in 1922, but sold it to William J. and Lottie Koster in 1924, then living at 599 Gilmour Street. The Koster family built the house at 601 Gilmour Street.

William J. Koster was a building contractor and also owned Koster Paint and Service Garage at 465 Aylmer Street North, and the family eventually moved from 601 Gilmour to a home on Aylmer Street. The home at 601 Gilmour Street remained vacant for a time after their departure. In 1942, Dr. Hugh A. Mitchell and his family purchased the home and resided there until 1950. Dr. Mitchell was a prominent doctor in Peterborough and was Chief of Staff at the Civic Hospital in 1952.

601 Gilmour Street has architectural value as an intact Arts & Crafts style bungalow. The home features a multihued stiff mud brick exterior with a unique river rock/cobblestone verandah with the rock detail covering the poured concrete foundation. The decorative stone construction features are somewhat rare in the Peterborough area and add a handcrafted quality to the home, an important feature of the Arts & Crafts movement, and similar to the stone used in the California style bungalow in Jackson Park from the same era, possibly quarried from the same area.

The Arts & Crafts movement is also evident in the home’s proportions, large, entrance pediment on the covered porch with heavy wooden columns on piers made of the same stone featured on the verandah and foundation. The roof also features simple boxed soffits and dormers.

The interior features of the home are also intact and reflect the aesthetic of the Arts & Crafts movement. It contains original wooden details such as a coffered ceiling, all original baseboards and mouldings. The main staircase with its thick, solid wood banisters and egg and dart motifs is reflective of the simple, handmade quality of the movement. Throughout the home, glass door knobs, original decorative hardware and stained glass windows remain intact.

ORIGINAL OWNER: William J. Koster

ARCHITECT/BUILDER: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1924

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

The home at 601 Gilmour was a typical single family home in close proximity to downtown businesses and was part of the significant construction in the “Avenues” when new subdivisions for single family homes were being developed. Most of these new homes were constructed of brick and were meant for single families.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • 1 ½ storey structure with poly chromatic brick;
  • Brick window sills
  • Brick voussoirs and single band of vertically laid brick along lower portion of the house, diamond-shaped detailing at roof peaks on south and north elevations
  • River stone/cobblestone construction of verandah, piers supporting wooden columns of porch pediment
  • River stone/cobblestone foundation
  • Original fenestration and wooden sash windows
  • Original wooden soffits and fascia
  • Wooden pediments and recessed front entrance

Interior Elements:

  • Original wooden details including:
    • staircase and entrance with egg and dart motif carved in wood and simple balusters
    • coffered ceiling in living room area
    • original wooden window sills and mouldings
  • originally decorative stained glass windows on main floor in dining room and upper floor washroom

285A George St N

Street Address: 285 George St.

Roll Number: 040050193020000

PIN Number: 281020020

Short Legal Description: PLAN 11 PT LOT 7 PT LOT 8 IN BLK E RP45R5796 PARTS 1 3 4 2217.00SF 21.19FR D

Owners Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date: October 13th, 2004

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASON FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

Built circa 1870-75, 285 George Street is valued for its architectural integrity and
decorative elements. Constructed by John J. Lundy, 285 George Street was
once the northern end of a block of buildings that curved around the corner and
continued west along King Street. 

The mansard roof and decorative elements that were added in the 1880’s remain only on 285 and 285A George Street. The unique cedar shingle pattern and ornate gable window surround are distinguishing features of this building, along with the corbelled
brickwork below the Mansard roof. The building is significant not only in its unusual display of decorative architectural elements, but also because it is the last remaining
section of a much larger block that extended south to the corner of King and George streets and continued west on King. It is also a good representative example of an early period in the development of the 19th century commercial streetscape of downtown Peterborough as more solid masonry structures took the place of earlier wood frame buildings.

The building also has historical value in its association with John J. Lundy, for whom the building was originallyy built. J.J Lundy was born in Peterborough in 1834 and was Mayor of the town from 1880-1881 as well as a president of the Little Lake Cemetery Company

ORIGINAL OWNER: John J. Lundy

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1870-1875

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

Located in the southern end of the traditional commercial core on the west side of George Street , between Sherbrooke and King Streets, 285 A George Street North was once the northern end of ‘The Lundy Building’ an entire block of buildings that curved around to King Street. The southern portion of the original structure is now a four storey post-modern commercial building. 283 George Street North is also part of the original block but has been heavily altered and none of the original features remain. 285 and 285A George Street North retain their original architectural integrity, and have recently undergone a restoration of the cedar shingles, brick work and windows. The storefronts of both buildings have been altered many times over the years.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Attributes:

  • Rectangular massing of the building
  • Original fenestration and window openings with wooden sash and surrounds on second storey
  • Original gable window in mansard roof with wooden sash and decorative
    surround
  • The original brick parapet firewall dividing 285 and 285 A George Street
  • Mansard roof with patterned cedar shingles and masonry dentils below the eaves
  • Decorative cedar gables and trim
  • Corbelled brick work

430 Sheridan St

Street Address: 430 Sheridan Street

Roll Number: 040100142000000

PIN Number:

Short Legal Description: PLAN 1 PT LOTS 5 AND 6 S BROCK ST E WATER ST REG 4567.00SF 40.00FR 114.17D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: January 2012

On Site Evaluation Date: June 28, 2004/July 2011

Evaluation Category: B (57.85)

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 2012

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION: 

430 Sheridan Street has cultural heritage value in its association with Walter Sheridan, the first owner of the land on which the house currently stands. Born in Ireland in 1796, Walter Sheridan moved to Peterborough in the early 1840s and became the town’s first Clerk in 1844. Also an architect, he purchased the land that now comprises Sheridan Street in 1847, and built a large estate on the land between 1847 and 1860. The Street was named Sheridan, and his home was once the only building on the street, then called Sheridan Terrace, and conveniently was built behind the County Courthouse, where he was Clerk from 1851-1870.

In 1884, Sheridan sold his land to Martha Sheridan, who then sold part of the property, where 430 Sheridan Street was constructed, to George Fitzgerald, partner of
Fitzgerald & Stanger Carriage Works on Brock Street. Fitzgerald & Stanger was a prominent business in Peterborough and undertook work for companies such as D.
Belleghem Furniture Dealer & Undertaker to refit and build funeral coaches. George Fitzgerald is listed as living at the address from 1884-1915.

The building’s simple architectural features are typical of the design of houses built for middle class business owners during this time period. All of the homes on this street would have been constructed during the latter part of the 19th century.

ORIGINAL OWNER: George Fitzgerald (land originallyy owned by Walter Sheridan)

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1884

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

The site of the building is significant as part of the large estate of Walter Sheridan, who was the County Clerk from 1851-1866.

The building is now used for commercial purposes as a graphic design firm, but is surrounded by buildings of similar age and construction techniques with the same
setback from the street, with a few exceptions of modern infill.

The neighbourhood features landmark buildings from the 19th century such as St. John’s Anglican Church and the Peterborough County Courthouse, both constructed in the 1830s.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • Two storey red brick construction with rear unit
  • Low hipped roof
  • Fieldstone foundation
  • Original window openings (new wooden windows) with 2/2 sash
  • Sand coloured brick voussoirs
  • Original front door opening with replacement wooden door and sidelights

C.P.R. Station (175 George St N)

Street Address: 175 George Street North

Roll Number: 040040151000000

PIN Number: 281010017

Short Legal Description: PT LOTS 1 & 2 N/WOLFE & S/DALHOUSIE W/GEO 45R-7675 PTS 1-3 & 45R-8193 PT 7 TO 9 IRREG 0.65AC 93.52FR D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date:

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: January 2012

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

The Canadian Pacific Railway Station at 175 George Street North has excellent cultural heritage value for its association with the early development of the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) and the importance of railroads in the growth of commerce in Peterborough. The CPR established the Ontario and Quebec Railway as a means to link urban centres in Ontario and Quebec with the less populated western provinces. A section was routed through Peterborough and leased to the CPR. Design of the station began in 1883, and Peterborough’s first railway station opened in 1884. It was constructed of buff brick in laid in Flemish Bond, a design which is somewhat rare in Peterborough. The structure was pointed with red mortar and had a slate roof (which has since been replaced with asphalt).

The CPR Station is the only remaining railway station in Peterborough, and according to a study conducted by the Ontario Ministry of Culture and Communications in 1989 it is the oldest CPR station still situated on its original site in Ontario. Until CP abandoned the station in 1990, it was the oldest surviving station in railway use in Canada. The station was one of four designed in 1883 by architect Thomas C. Sorby, one of the most prolific architects of the late 19th century. Sorby also designed stations in Toronto, Winnipeg and Quebec, along with several CPR hotels. Peterborough’s station was considered one of the most attractive on the rail line at the time of its construction, and became a prototype for many other stations throughout the country.

The addition was constructed in 1919 to accommodate the washrooms and interior station offices. It was designed by engineer J.R Fairbairn who was born in Peterborough in 1873 and was Chief Engineer for CPR in Montreal at the time of the addition’s construction. J.R Fairbairn was a prominent engineer in Canada and held the titles of President of the Engineering Institute of Canada and VicePresident of the American Railway Engineering Association during his career.

The original details which remain in the CPR Station contribute to its architectural significance. Its buff brick exterior, laid in Flemish bond pattern pointed with red mortar is a unique feature and is somewhat unusual in CPR station design. The brick, wooden window surrounds and wooden shingles have all been restored along with the main structure of the interior. The CPR Station also features stained glass transom windows throughout, most of which are replicas of the originals, although a few have survived and were restored.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Ontario & Quebec Railway Company

ARCHITECT: Thomas Charles Sorby – J.R Fairbairn Engineer (1919 addition)

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1883-84, 1919 addition

BUILDER: Ontario & Quebec Railway Company

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

The station is located along the railway line at the southwest corner of George and Dalhousie Street, at the edge of Peterborough’s downtown. It is oriented toward to the train tracks which run parallel to the building. Peterborough’s station provided an important link between Toronto and Ottawa, and was at the centre of one of the few north-south rail lines to survive in the early development of the railway. The CPR Station is the only train station that remains in Peterborough.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • One storey buff brick building, original 1884 & 1919 addition
  • Solid buff brick walls (painted red at one time) laid in Flemish bond, tuck pointed with red mortar
  • Low-hipped roof, accented by gabled pediments
  • High cut stone foundation
  • Decorative boxed cornices at eaves and gable ends
  • Gables with decorative beam and four brackets across base
  • Gables on the east, west and south elevations with bracketed wooden cornice, louvered vents and gable clad with fish-scale shingles
  • Fenestration, window surrounds and openings including beveled stone lintels, stone sills on windows and door openings

Interior Elements:

  • Original (restored), and replicas of four paned transom window openings with stained glass
  • Original interior woodwork including wainscoting, original ceiling height and mouldings, window trim
  • Original plaster ceiling medallions

406-408 George St N

Street Address: 406-408 George Street North

Roll Number: 040100072000000

PIN Number: 281030134

Short Legal Description: PLAN 1 PT LOT 1 PLAN 5 LOTS 3 4 PT LOTS 2 AND 5 RP 45R14063 PART 2 2893.00SF 44.00FR D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date: June 28, 2004

Evaluation Category: B (61.6)

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

406-408 George Street North has historical value as one of the earliest structures to be built on the block by James T. Henthorn, an early Peterborough developer. Henthorn owned and developed all of the property that stands north of Hunter Street on the East
side of George Street from the time he purchased it in the 1830s until his death in 1877. In 1854, J.T Henthorn was appointed First Lieutenant of Peterborough’s first Fire Brigade. At the time he was also a member of Council. Ironically, J. T Henthorn lost many of his original buildings to fire along George and Hunter Streets in the 1850s. In 1855, Council passed a bylaw prohibiting any frame construction in the area east of Aylmer Street as a result of several disastrous downtown fires.

The building at 406-408 George Street North has retained its architectural integrity and is one of the oldest surviving commercial buildings in downtown Peterborough. It is flanked by late 19th and early 20th century buildings in an historic streetscape. This building is located in what was historically referred to as the “best business part of town”. It has been used for commercial purposes continuously since its construction in the 1850s and has been home to a theatre, a dry goods store, florist, dentist offices and various clubs, such as the Forresters Hall and Belmont Club. In the 1930s the Liquor Control Board of Ontario was an occupant. 406-408 George Street North historically contained six separate storefronts, with residential space above available to boarders, merchants or owners of the stores below.

ORIGINAL OWNER: James Trotter Henthorn

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: circa 1858

BUILDER: Unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

The James T. Henthorn Building at 406-408 George Street North is flanked on either side by designated heritage properties and has excellent contextual value as part of an intact historic commercial streetscape of three storey buildings running from Brock Street to Simcoe Street on the east side of George.

The buildings surrounding it are of similar age, scale and have shared a common commercial use throughout their existence. Most of the block north of Hunter Street was constructed in the late 1850s, and containing of the earliest surviving commercial buildings in the city.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • three-storey, three-bay painted brick rectangular structure with stretcher bond construction
  • Flat roof
  • Fenestration on third-storey with segmented label surrounds and radiating brick voussoirs
  • All window openings set in elongated brick recesses
  • Wooden details including all original wooden window surrounds and sills
  • Decorative brickwork including dentil details along top section of third storey just below the roof

184 London St

Street Address: 184 London Street 

Roll Number: 040070005000000

PIN Number:

Short Legal Description: P

AN 1 PT LOT 3 N LONDON ST W GEORGE ST IRREG 0.15AC 52.33FR 100.50D

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date:

Evaluation Category: B (55.6)

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

The property at 184 London Street is significant in its association with the Dickson Mills neighbourhood and its proximity to the sites of two of the major lumber mills in Peterborough at the time of its construction: the Baptie Planing Mill at Dublin Street, which produced large quantities of sash, doors, blinds and other millwork used in area buildings and The Dickson Lumber Company, situated on the Otonabee River. At its peak in the 1860s, The Dickson Lumber Company was producing five million feet of lumber per year for export to Britain. The neighbourhood would have been home to lumber workers of all types from lumbermen working the raceway to carpenters, millwrights and craftspeople. The original owner of the home, James Hope, was a carpenter and contractor.

The Hope House is a typical one and a half storey brick home constructed during the 1860s and 1870s to house the labour force for the lumber businesses in the area. The building is also significant as an early masonry building in an area that was predominantly wood frame at the time. The home is also significant for having remained in the Hope family for almost 100 years.

ORIGINAL OWNER: James Hope

ARCHITECT: Unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: c. late 1860s

BUILDER: Unknown, possibly James Hope

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

The building is located in a very early residential neighbourhood in close proximity to the historic commercial core of the town. The prosperous lumber mills of Samuel Dickson and the Baptie brothers were located within walking distance of the home, and employed a large number of men living in the immediate vicinity. The simplicity of its construction suggests that it was constructed for working class inhabitants. It was constructed during a time when cheaply made, mass produced architectural adornment was not yet commonly available for vernacular worker’s housing. The house is a significant contributing building to an almost intact 19th century neighbourhood of similarly scaled buildings and limited modern infill.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • Original red brick one and a half storey construction
  • Medium pitch gable roof with central gabled dormer in south elevation
  • Original window openings
  • Original decorative brickwork including painted quoins and soldier coursed voussoirs
  • Stone foundation
  • Simple, boxed soffits and eaves

482 Mark St

Street Address: 482 Mark Street

Roll Number: 04015141000000

PIN Number: 281340069

Short Legal Description: PT LT 7 E OF MARK ST, N OF HUNTER ST & S OF DOURO ST PL 1A VILLAGE OF ASHBURNHAM AS IN R 591814, T/W R 270093; PETERBOROUGH CITY

Owners concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date: April 2012

Evaluation Category: B (56.7)

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASON FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

The Peterborough Mattress Company (also known as Peterborough Mattress and Spring Company; and Peterborough Mattress and Upholstery Co.) remains one of the earliest examples of industry in Peterborough. First owned by William Fain , the Factory was located along the Otonabee River, on the east side of Hunter Street. The Factory was purchased by James Ellis in the late 1890s. Ellis moved the Factory to the back of his Mark Street property in 1927, when the construction of the new Hunter Street Bridge forced the closure of many of the industrial buildings in the area.

When the Factory was relocated to Mark Street in 1927, the reconstructed building was designed and built by James Ellis’ father-in-law, John H. Bettes, a millwright with Quaker Oats. This structure reused the material from the original site, as well as materials salvaged from various other buildings. 

The Mattress Company sold products to Marshall Mattress Company in Toronto, local resorts such as Viamede and Mount Julian, local hospitals, Eaton’s, Harry McGuinnus’ Travel Trailers, the King George Hotel, and private homes in the area. Besides mattresses, the Factory manufactured springs and upholstery. Mattresses were filled with marsh hay, horse hair, wool, and feathers, all from local suppliers. In 1936, a branch plant was opened in Lindsay, Ontario. 

The Factory eventually moved to a new plant on the Queensway, where it remained in operation until the mid 1970s.

ORIGINAL OWNER: James Ellis

ARCHITECT: John H. Bettes

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: c. 1927

BUILDER: John H. Bettes

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

The Mattress Factory was first located on the east side of Hunter Street, along
the Otonabee River. In 1927, when construction began on the new Hunter Street
Bridge, the Factory was rebuilt on the Mark Street property, backing onto the
Canadian National Railway line.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Attributes:

  • Red brick construction
  • Concrete foundation
  • Original window openings with replica wood sash windows
  • Original entrance openings with replica wood doors
  • Wooden soffits, eaves, and fascia

499 Homewood Ave

Street Address: 499 Homewood Avenue

Roll Number: 030050099000000

PIN Number: 280840092

Short Legal Description: PT LOTS 24, 25 S HOMEWOOD AV, PL 65 AMENDED BY PL 79 AMENDED BY PL 88 PETERBOROUGH AS IN R588040; PETERBOROUGH

Owners Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date: January 2012
Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: June 10, 2013

SHORT STATEMENT FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION

Like much of the land in the neighbouring area, 499 Homewood was once the property of George A. Cox. He owned the property until 1887, when it was sold to Peter Weese Reynolds. Lot 24 and Lot 25 were sold and divided a number of times in order to accommodate 499 Homewood as the property exists today. In 1904, the land was sold to The Toronto Savings and Loan Company, one of the companies owned by George A. Cox. Toronto Savings and Loan sold all of Lot 24 and 38 feet 6 inches of Lot 25 to Julia Victoria Trebilcok on February 1, 1913. The transfer of the land was subject to building restrictions stating that: only one dwelling could be erected on the land at any one time; that any building must be constructed of brick, stone or a combination of the two; that no outbuildings could be erected on the lands; that any dwelling must be in line with the Bradburn house; and that all plans for a dwelling would first need to be
submitted for approval to the Toronto Savings and Loan Company. Many of the properties in the surrounding neighbourhood were subject to similar building restrictions.

This arts and craft style house, designed by William Blackwell, was built in 1914. The contractor on the project was Thomas C. Ephegrave. Blackwell, one of Peterborough’s most prominent architects, also designed the YMCA and Anson House. When Blackwell retired in 1926, his son took over the company and moved the firm to Toronto where it became Blackwell, Craig and Zeidler. In 1918, Julia Trebilcok sold the land to Henry Cressman, Vice President of The Cressman Co. Ltd, a department store in Peterborough. He owned the property for nine years before selling it to John Gillespie. The Gillespie family had settled in the Peterborough area in 1903 and John’s father, George A. Gillespie, entered the dairy supply business. George Gillespie purchased the Peterborough Creamery in 1910 and his family, including son John, ran the business until 1969.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Julia and Fred Trebilcock

ARCHITECT: William Blackwell

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1914

BUILDER: Thomas C. Ephgrave

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

Located in a well-established neighbourhood, the land where 499 Homewood Avenue now sits was once a part of the estate of George A. Cox. Many of the properties in the area were subject to building restrictions in the early 1900s, resulting in a neighbourhood that maintains a sense of architectural integrity.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Attributes:

  • 2 ½ storey brown brick construction
    • Stucco at upper level
  • Pitched roof
  • Octagonal roof dormer with fish scale shingles
  • Fenestration
    • Original window openings with concrete sills
    • Multi-paned lead glass casement windows
    • Bays with multi-pane windows
  • Original entrance opening with flat canopy
  • Garage
    • Brick at street level
    • Stucco at upper level
    • Flat canopy with wooden brackets over door

512 Weller St

Street Address: 512 Weller Street

Roll Number: 030050227000000

PIN Number: 280850249

Short Legal Description: LT 7 & PT LT 8 PL 49 (PETERBOROUGH0 AS IN R334418; PETERBOROUGH

Owners Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: June 11, 2013

On Site Evaluation Date: August 2012

Evaluation Category: B

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: June 10, 2013

PACAC Application Approval Date: June 19, 2013

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASON FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

The land at 512 Weller Street was originallyy part of the estate of George A Cox. Cox owned the land until 1891, when it was sold to Patrick McHugh. The land had several other owners, until Cox repurchased the property in 1911. Upon his death in 1914, the property was passed to his son, Herbert Coplin Cox.

Herbert Cox immediately granted the land to Alfred H. Cox, in trust for Annie Scott and her daughter Irene Scott. Annie Scott (nee Cox) was married to Gilbert James Scott. When Annie died in 1920, the property passed to Irene and her husband, John Kirk Hughes, a prominent local car merchant. The property remained in the ownership of the ancestors of George A. Cox until 1950, when the house was sold to Kathleen Bell.

The house has undergone very few structural changes since it was built circa 1907. It is an example of Queen Anne style architecture, similar to many of the other houses in the surrounding neighbourhood. The house is a 2 ½ storey red stretcher bond brick construction, with a gabled front facade. The front façade also features a large veranda, with Doric columns set in brick piers. The property originallyy had a stable, which was converted to a garage in 1913. By 1984, only one wall of the brick garage was still standing.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Thomas Lockhart

ARCHITECT: unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: c. 1907

BUILDER: unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

Located in a well-established neighbourhood, the land where 512 Weller Street now sits was once a part of the estate of George A. Cox. Many of the properties in the area were subject to building restrictions in the early 1900s, resulting in a neighbourhood that maintains a sense of architectural integrity. Many of the surrounding properties are of similar design and construction as 512 Weller Street.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Attributes:

  • 2 ½ storey red brick construction 
    • Including wing on south façade
    • Addition to rear
  • Medium gabled roof
    • Including a side gable on east façade
    • Gables clad with fish-scale shingles
    • Chimney
  • Wooden roof trim including brackets on eaves
  • Wooden front veranda
    • Doric columns in brick piers
    • Pediment over porch clad with fish-scale shingles
  • Fenestration
    • Original window openings with wooden sills and wooden detailing
    • Original front entrance opening with a lead glass transom
    • Lead glass windows on north and west façade
    • Upper storey door on east façade
  • Wooden side veranda
    • Doric columns in brick piers

404 Belmont Ave

Street Address: 404 Belmont Avenue

Roll Number: 030050185000000

PIN Number: 280840080

Short Legal Description: LTS 5, 6 & PT LT 4 N HUNTER ST, PL 65 AMENDED BY PL 79 AMENDED BY PL 88 PETERBOROUGH AS IN R377447; PETERBOROUGH

Owners’ Mailing Address: 404 Belmont Avenue, Peterborough ON K9H 5S7

PACAC Application Review Date: June 11, 2013

On Site Evaluation Date: March 2013

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: June 10, 2013

PACAC Application Approval Date: June 19, 2013

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASON FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

404 Belmont Avenue is one of a few Georgian Revival houses in Peterborough. Built in 1905 by William Langford, the house was designed by Sproatt and Rolph, an architectural firm based in Toronto. The house was commissioned by Edward Wood as a gift for his parents. The house has many typical features of the Georgian Revival style including a panelled front door that is centred on the front façade and 6 over 1 windows that contribute to the symmetrical look of the house. The house has undergone few alterations since 1905, with the most noticeable alteration being the enclosure of the back porch.

The land was originallyy owned by George A. Cox, who also owned much of the land in the surrounding neighbourhood. Through his company, The Toronto Savings and Loan Company, Cox transferred the land to Edward Wood in August of 1905. The transfer of the land was subject to building restrictions, stating: that no more than one dwelling was to be built on the land at any time; that no dwelling could be built any closer to Hunter Street than the current house; that any future dwelling be built in line with any houses on the adjoining lots; that no
outbuildings were to be erected on the lot; and that any dwelling must be built of brick or stone or a combination thereof. There are similar building restrictions on many of the lots in the surrounding neighbourhood.

At the time when Edward Wood purchased the land, he was working in Toronto at the headquarters of the Toronto Savings and Loan Company. He purchased the land at 404 Belmont as a gift for his parents, John and Jane Wood. John Wood was the Headmaster of the Ashburnham School. Sproatt and Rolph was commissioned to design the house. The land was transferred to John Wood, with the same building restrictions as when Edward purchased the property.

The property remained in the Wood family following John’s death in 1910. Jane
died in 1922 and the house occupied by their daughter, Annie, until her death in
1962. Following the Wood family, the house was occupied by W. Donald Bark, a
local solicitor.

ORIGINAL OWNER: John and Jane Wood

ARCHITECT: Sproatt and Rolph

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1905

BUILDER: William Langford

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

Located in a well-established neighbourhood, the land where 404 Belmont Avenue now sits was once a part of the estate of George A. Cox. Many of the properties in the area were subject to building restrictions in the early 1900s, resulting in a neighbourhood that maintains a sense of architectural integrity. 404 Belmont Avenue, located at the corner of Belmont Avenue and Hunter Street West, has successfully maintained much of the properties original landscape.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Attributes:

  • 2 storey red brick construction
    • Including brick banding and quoins
  • Hip roof
    • Including soffits with dentils
    • Chimneys
  • Fenestration
    • Original window openings with wooden and concrete sills, and brick surrounds with keystones
    • 6 / 1 sash windows, 4 /1 sash windows, and an arched window
    • Bay windows
    • 3 dormers on front façade
    • Shutters
  • Portico on front façade with an oversized panelled wooden door
  • Enclosed back porch with second storey balcony

512 Dickson St

Street Address: 512 Dickson Street

Roll Number: 040100148500000

PIN Number: 284850072

Short Legal Description: PT LT 8 & 9 S OF MCDONNEL ST & E OF WATER ST, PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH, PTS 1 & 2, 45R14090

Owners Concurrence: Yes

PACAC Application Review Date: October 9, 2012

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: October 5, 2012

PACAC Application Approval Date: October 9, 2012

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASON FOR HERITAGE DESIGNATION:

Constructed on land originallyy granted to George Barker Hall in 1841, the lot on which the home was built was purchased by Samuel Dickson in 1856. Although alterations have been made to the house over the years, it still remains a good example of the larger Italianate houses popular in Peterborough in the mid 1870s. 512 Dickson Street was one of three houses built for the daughters of Samuel Dickson.

Samuel Dickson emigrated from Ireland to Peterborough in 1830 and was first employed as a distiller. By 1839, Dickson had leased his first mill from John Hall. As the business grew, Dickson began purchasing property along the shores of the Otonabee and soon had mills on both sides of the river. He was considered to be one of the largest lumber producers in the area. When Dickson died in 1870, his land was transferred to the company.

In 1891, Thomas Hazlitt and Richard Hall, trustees of the Dickson Estate transferred the ownership of the property to Ellen Walsh, one of Dickson’s daughters. Ellen and her husband William lived at 512 Dickson Street until 1897. Afterward the house was occupied by various family members until it was rented to George Gladman in 1908. At the time, Gladman was the first vice president of the William Hamilton Company.

The house was rented a number of times during the 1920s. The tenants included George Lundy; James Wallace, manager of Central Ontario Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada; and Noble Wootten, also the manager of Central Ontario Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada. In 1935, the house was rented to Gordon H Munro, vice president of The Peterborough Lumber Company (former Dickson Mills) and the great grandson of Samuel Dickson.

In 1951, the executor of Ellen Walsh’s estate, her niece Laura Jane Davidson, sold the property to Munro. The Munros continued to live at 512 Dickson Street until 1966, when the property was sold to Alfred Cole, registrar at Trent University. The Coles owned the property until the early 1980s.

ORIGINAL OWNER: Ellen Walsh

ARCHITECT: unknown

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: c. 1879

BUILDER: unknown

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

Located in the neighbourhood known as Dickson Mills, near the former site of Samuel Dickson’s lumber mill, the house at 512 Dickson Street is one of three properties associated with the Dickson family.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Attributes:

  • Two storey masonry red clay brick with running bond construction
  • Parged stone foundation
  • Shallow hip roof
  • Existing chimney on north side
  • Two projecting engaged two storey bays including deeply overhanging pediment gable roof
  • Original wood vergeboard
  • Original wood soffits and eaves with paired Italianate cornice brackets
  • Wrap around veranda with square wood columns, wooden floors, and shallow pediment roof with associated wood detail
  • Wooden window surrounds and brick mould
  • Stone lug sills
  • Dripstones (hood) over windows
  • Doors
  • Masonry shed roof addition to the rear

Peterborough Collegiate and Vocational School (201 McDonnel St)

Street Address: 201 McDonnel Street

Roll Number: 040061011000000

PIN Number:

Short Legal Description: TOWN PLAN 1 PT LOT 3 PT LOT 4 PT LOT 5 PT LOT 6 S MCDONNEL W GEO REG 87552.00SF 456.00FR 192.00D

Owners’ Concurrence:

PACAC Application Review Date:

On Site Evaluation Date:

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: May 25, 2014

ORIGINAL OWNER: The Peterborough Public School Board

DATES OF CONSTRUCTION: 1907-08, 1927-28, 1966

ARCHITECTS:

1908 Building - John Belcher, supervising architect working to provincial design
1927 Addition - W.R.L Blackwell
1966 Gymnasium - Craig, Zeidler and Strong

BUILDERS:

1908 Building - Langford and Sheehy
1927 Addition - Unknown
1966 Gymnasium - Mortlock Construction

History

In May of 1826 the Reverend Samuel Armour opened the first school in Peterborough. The Peterborough Government School was located on grounds to the west of the site on which Central Public School (now converted to apartments), would later be built. The Government School divided the students into two groups: common, for applied subjects and grammar, for academic subjects. The Reverend Armour taught both groups in a single building heated with open fireplaces. Within a few years the population of school age children in the town had grown such that it was necessary to move the common students to separate space.

By 1854 the school trustees had leased a church to hold the growing number of common students. This arrangement proved unsatisfactory and in 1859 the Union School (later Central Public School), large enough for all grades, was built to the south of the original Government School on Murray Street facing Victoria Park. In 1871 legislative changes abolished the term grammar school as a reference to academic streaming and the Union School became the Peterborough Collegiate Institute (PCI). The school doubled in size with the construction of a second building to the west when, in 1876, the trustees began admitting girls.

By the turn-of-the-century overcrowding made it necessary for the collegiate to have its own building. The Town agreed to the sale of a section of Central Park (now Confederation Square) to the School Board at the same time that a section was being sold to the federal government for a new armoury. The school, designed by John Belcher picks up many of the design elements of the armoury building. On July 31, 1907 the cornerstone was laid and, with a budget of $61,000 the contractors Langford and Sheehy completed construction in time for classes to begin in September of 1908. In 1927, at a cost of nearly $300,000 a vocational school wing was added to the west of the original building, and PCI became Peterborough Collegiate and Vocational Institute (PCVS). The addition included a gymnasium, library and additional classroom space. In the 1970s, a cafeteria was created from a central light well in the interior of the building.

At the time that the school ceased operating as a collegiate and vocational institute in 2012, it was one of the longest continuously operating secondary schools in Ontario. Over the years a number of unique traditions grew within the school. These included having a photographic portrait of each principal installed above the balcony doors of the auditorium, at the end of their tenure. The school also contains a comprehensive collection of original Canadian art. A tradition arose in the 1940s of having the student council purchase pieces of art for the enjoyment of the students. Artists represented in the collection, now on permanent loan to the Art Gallery of Peterborough, include: Andre Bieler, A.J. Casson, Lawren Harris, Arthur Lismer, Manley MacDonald and Henri Masson.

In the course of its history the school has graduated nationally and internationally renowned artists, business leaders and politicians including Serena Ryder, Evelyn Hart, Sean Cullen, Jim Balsillie, Mr. Justice Michael Moldaver and Lester B. Pearson. Nearly 1000 students served on active duty during the two World Wars and 152 died in action. A limestone plaque, carved by noted sculptor Frances Loring, is inscribed with the names of 94 staff and students of the school who died during the Second World War. The plaque was commissioned in 1947 and is mounted next to the entrance to the main office.

Architectural Description:

PCVS is architecturally significant as an expression of collegiate architecture rendered at a time of rapid growth and economic optimism for the City of Peterborough. The building’s design represents a transition from the formidable presence of the Romanesque Revival style in the late Victorian era to a lighter, more refined expression of progress presented by the Beaux Arts or Classical Revival style which came to characterize Edwardian design in Canada.

This transitioning was less deliberate on the part of John Belcher than enforced by the school board’s demand that the new school’s design carry on the authoritative traditions represented by the Romanesque Armoury and Drill Hall to the south. The result is a series of odd juxtapositions like the heavy crenellated pilasters that flank the Romanesque main entry surmounted two storeys above by a large Palladian window, a distinctly classical feature, set in a shallow roof dormer. Belcher’s original proposal shows an edifice that is more unified in its design with an integration of elements characteristic of Edwardian architecture and even hinting at the Prairie School of design popular in the United States at the time. The cost of his design however greatly exceeded the construction budget and a pair of two storey wings balancing the mass of the main block was lost in the final work. Overall the detailing on the building is subdued with little of the ornamentation that characterizes other Classical Revival buildings on the Square like the 1911 Carnegie Library (now the City Hall Annex).

The building has a slightly unusual orientation in that it faces east towards Confederation Square, not the street. originallyy a sidewalk ran the length of the west edge of the park and a walkway from it led to the entrance of the school.

The 1907 three storey, three bay building sits on a raised foundation of rusticated limestone. The structure is essentially rectangular in form with the central sections of the north and south elevations recessed to give the effect of four corner pavilions. A hip roof covers the central portion of the building with separate, smaller hip roofs covering the corner pavilions. Four massive chimneys rise from the intersections of the main and pavilion roofs flanking large gableroofed dormers centred in the north and south elevations.

The 1927 addition is a two storey square structure on a fully raised basement storey. The basement level on the addition is executed in brick referencing and aligning with the raised stone foundation on the original building but reading as the ground floor of this section of the school. This is reinforced by the two courses of limestone foundation stones that extend across the base of the addition and partially frame a series of classroom windows that match those on the floors above in height and width. The effect is completed by a heavy, pedimented Romanesque entry in limestone that is entered at grade. The addition has a flat roof with a low brick parapet wall above the second storey capped with limestone and punctuated at regular intervals by small drainage openings.

Overall the addition is subdued in its ornamentation with limited use of limestone on the facades, even on the north, front elevation. The addition is four bays by four bays with the main entrance offset to the easternmost bay of the north elevation. A fifth bay to the east of the entry acts as a connection to the original school an belies the symmetry of the addition’s footprint.

The west and south elevations are simple and unadorned, carrying over the detailing of the north elevation- slightly recessed arches over the top floor windows, brick string courses and the rhythm of slightly projecting wall sections between banks of windows. The west elevation is particularly utilitarian with loading doors providing access to the workshop areas

The 1966 Gymnasium by Craig, Zeidler and Strong is a stark representation of their early exploration of international modernism in Ontario. A windowless one storey red brick block rises from a stark white concrete foundation that references the height of the raised basement level of the original building. The building is devoid of any ornamentation and is a clear expression of the modernist philosophy that function, not extraneous detail dictates form. The structure is offset from the original school and is accessed by a short one story hallway.

CONTEXT- SITE AND SETTING:

PCVS is located on the south side of McDonnel Street mid-block between George and Aylmer Streets. The front façade of the original building faces Confederation Square and the school is a prominent and integral part of an assembly of monumental late 19th and early 20th century civic buildings which frame the park. PCVS is comprised of three distinct but connected structures all of which are built on land originallyy used as the town’s first burial ground.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials including but not limited to: wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

1907 School:

  • Crenellated pilasters flanking main entrance
  • Romanesque main entry
  • Window openings
  • Large Palladian window above main entry with rusticated limestone voussoirs
  • Shallow roof dormer above main entry
  • Eastern orientation of building towards Confederation Square
  • Raised foundation of rusticated limestone
  • Rectangular form of three storey structure
  • Recessed central section of north and south elevations
  • Roof system
  • Four massive chimneys
  • Large gable-roofed dormers centred in the north and south elevations.
  • Arched entry of dressed limestone with a semicircular transom
  • Two storey bow windows with semi-conical roofs.
  • Limestone detailing including, but not limited to window sills and string courses
  • Pair of short decorative posts anchoring east elevation wall dormer.

1927 Addition:

  • Limestone entry including entry doors
  • Limestone detailing including, but not limited to window sills and coping stones
  • Three storey projecting entry bay with stepped parapet
  • Window openings and existing windows and frames
  • Crenellated parapet roof line
  • Arched entries and projecting entry bays on west elevation

Interior Elements:

  • All original woodwork including, but not limited to:
    • Original wooden passage doors with glazing including transoms
    • Decorative woodwork including door and window jambs, casings. cornice
      mouldings, plinth blocks and applied features.
    • Original cabinetry in classrooms halls and offices
    • Wainscoting in halls, stairwells, classrooms and offices
    • Wooden stair rails including handrails, newels and balusters
    • Wood capped steel stair railings including newel posts with polished brass
      finials
    • Glass and wood partitions in hallways and classrooms
    • Stained glass in door transoms
    • Interior window units in hallways
    • Skylight in third floor classroom
    • Wood partition in small gymnasium including track system
  • All plaques, commemorative features and artwork permanently affixed to interior
    walls including, but not limited to:
    • Carved marble panel over the auditorium entrance “Our Un-returning Brave” 1914-1918 Plaque in main hall
    • 1939-1945 memorial carving
  • All architectural finishes including, but not limited to:
    • Run in place plaster cornice mouldings
    • Hardwood and terrazzo flooring
    • Scoring pattern on walls in hallways simulating cut stone walls
    • Marble clad entrance arches at 1927 main entrance including inlaid tiles framing archways
    • Marble wall cladding at 1927 main entrance and stairs
    • Tin ceilings in hallways, offices and classrooms
  • All fixtures in the auditorium and projection room
  • School bells
  • Freight elevator in basement

252 Parkhill Rd W

Street Address: 252 Parkhill Road West

Roll Number: 050020001000000

PIN Number: 281130044

Short Legal Description: LOTS 5 & 6, PLAN 53, PETERBOROUGH 

Owners’ Concurrence: Yes 

On Site Evaluation Date: May 8, 2013

Evaluation Category: A

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: August 27, 2015

Short Statement of Reasons for Heritage Designation

John Edward Hammond, farmer and local gentleman, was the original owner of 252 Parkhill Road West (originallyy 252 Smith Street West) and arranged for the house to be built some ten years after his marriage to Harriet Macdonald, a niece of lumber merchant, Mossom Boyd, and sister-in law to noted architect John E. Belcher.

Hammond enjoyed a close relationship with Belcher, who is listed both as a Trustee in the Deed of Trust drawn up prior to Hammond’s marriage to Harriet Macdonald, and as the informant on Hammond’s death record, dated January 3, 1887.

Built in the Victorian gothic style, 252 Parkhill Road is a grander example of the design employed by Belcher in his construction of 643 Bethune Street during the same period. Given the common design characteristics between the two properties, there is strong evidence that John Belcher designed and constructed the house at 252 Parkhill Road West. The property
would have enjoyed a direct sightline of 269 Edinburgh Street (Smithtown Hill House), occupied by the Belchers during this period and previously occupied by Mossom Boyd.

John Hammond named his house “Ashley” after his childhood home in England. His occupancy of the house was cut short due to his death from typhoid in 1887, but his widow Harriet remained at Ashley until at least 1913. She later lived with her son, Dr. Arthur Hammond, at 232 Brock Street known today as “Hammond Hall’.

The relationship of the Hammond family with architect John Belcher, and the family’s longstanding connection to Peterborough, both contribute to the cultural significance of 252
Parkhill Road West. Many of the most significant architectural features of the house have been retained, including the steeply pitched gabled roof, lancet windows, and stained glass, making it an excellent representative example of Victorian Gothic architecture in present-day Peterborough.

Original Owner: John Hammond

Date of Construction: c.1885

Architect: unknown

Builder: unknown

Context - Site and Setting:

252 Parkhill Road occupies a prominent site overlooking the city on the edge of the historic northern boundary of Peterborough on what is known as Smith Town Hill. The area is the point of origin of European settlement in what was surveyed as Smith Township in 1818. Settlement spread progressively from this point along the portage that formed Communications Road and is now Chemong Road. The property forms a part of the land annexed from Smith Township in
1872.

Summary of Heritage Attributes to be Designated:

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all facades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • Two-storey masonry red clay brick with running bond construction
  • Masonry water table
  • Steeply pitched gabled roof
  • Two projecting two-storey bays including deeply overhanging pediments and half timbering on the western bay
  • Cut granite stone foundation
  • All windows with wooden sills and surrounds including:
    • Paired lancet windows with double relieving arches and voussoirs
    • Individual lancet windows with voussoirs
    • South-facing tripartite window
    • Dormer windows
    • Stained glass
  • Wood soffits and eaves, including paired brackets and wood beads
  • Wood bargeboard
  • South-facing wooden verandah, including ornate woodwork
  • West-facing verandah including all woodwork, wood panelling, decorative wood detailing, glazing, stained glass, central pediment in enclosed glass section, and lattice at the south end
  • Main entry vestibule with lancet opening and wooden railing above
  • 1-storey bay on east side with decorative wood shingles and wooden
    railing

503 Homewood Ave

Street Address: 503 Homewood Avenue

Roll Number: 030050100000000

Short Legal Description: PLAN 88 LOT 23 PT LOT 24 IRREG 0.29AC 82.50FR 154.30D

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: 7 September 2017

STATEMENT OF CULTURAL HERITAGE VALUE OR INTEREST

The subject property has been researched and evaluated in order to determine its cultural heritage significance under Ontario Regulation 9/06 of the Ontario Heritage Act R.S.O. 1990. A property is eligible for designation if it has physical, historical, associative or contextual value and meets any one of the nine criteria set out under Regulation 9/06 of the Act. Staff have determined that 503 Homewood Avenue has cultural heritage value or interest and merits designation under the Ontario Heritage Act.

1. The property has design value or physical value because it:

i. is a rare, unique, representative or early example of a style, type, expression, material or construction method:

503 Homewood Avenue is an excellent example of the Second Empire style as applied to domestic architecture in Peterborough and features many key components of the style rendered in brick such decorative window treatments, brackets and a mansard roof with fish scale shingles.

ii. displays a high degree of craftsmanship or artistic merit:

The building displays a high degree of craftsmanship in numerous decorative elements including the window treatments and brackets. Overall, the house is an excellent rendering of Second Empire domestic architecture in brick which uses characteristic asymmetry in line with wider trends for home-building inthis style.

iii. demonstrates a high degree of technical or scientific achievement:

There are no technical or scientific achievements associated with this property.

2. The property has historical value or associative value because it:

i. has direct associations with a theme, event, belief, person, activity, organization or institution that is significant to a community:

503 Homewood Avenue has cultural heritage value or interest as the home of W.H. Bradburn and family between 1900 and 1988. The Bradburns are a significant Peterborough family with regard to both business and government as well as to the community in general. W.H. Bradburn, the first Bradburn to occupy the house, was elected to Peterborough Council in 1907 and become mayor in 1912. He was elected MPP in 1923 and 1926. Furthermore, his son, Herbert Bradburn who lived in the house until his death in 1988, was a member of City Council from 1937 to 1946. Both were also heavily involved in the Bradburn family’s local business ventures as well as Peterborough city life in general and the development of the city throughout the early twentieth century.

ii. yields, or has the potential to yield, information that contributes to an understanding of a community or culture:

The subject property has the potential to yield additional information regarding the mid 19th and 20th century development of upper middle class suburban Peterborough.

iii. demonstrates or reflects the work or ideas of an architect, artist, builder, designer or theorist who is significant to a community:

No architect or builder has currently been definitively identified for the
building. It may be the work of the owner of the property in the early 1890s,
carpenter and builder Arthur Rutherford.

3. The property has contextual value because it:

i. is important in defining, maintaining or supporting the character of an area:

The property maintains the suburban residential character of the surrounding area through its use of red brick, its set back from the street and use of a fashionable nineteenth century domestic architectural style, in this case, Second Empire. Furthermore, after its construction, the building was important in defining the character of the local area. As one of the first houses
constructed on the neighbourhood on subdivided portions of the George A. Cox estate, initial building restrictions placed on the lot in 1891 required construction to be set back from the street and prohibited the use of wood. Later houses in the immediate vicinity were required to use 503 Homewood Avenue as a benchmark, making it a key defining influence in the development of the suburban area around Homewood Avenue.

ii. is physically, functionally, visually or historically linked to its surroundings

The subject property is historically and visually linked to its surroundings through the use of red brick and fashionable nineteenth-century architectural styles on large treed lots with significant setback from the street. The property is an integral part of the suburban, residential landscape of the Old West End neighbourhood of Peterborough.

iii. is a landmark. O. Reg. 9/06, s. 1 (2).

The house at 503 Homewood Avenue is a landmark because of its role as a benchmark for the development of other houses in the local area. As one of the earliest houses on Homewood Avenue, it was explicitly identified as a benchmark for development in the building restrictions for at least one other property, 499 Homewood Avenue, making it an integral landmark for the overall development of the street.

Design and Physical Value

503 Homewood Avenue is an excellent example of Second Empire domestic architecture executed in brick. Likely constructed between 1891 and 1893, the building exemplifies the Second Empire domestic style through its use of an overhanging mansard roof with fish scale
shingles and decorative brackets; decorative dormer window mouldings; and an
asymmetrical plan which emphasizes the entranceway through a unique two-storey, wooden verandah.

The property is a simplified version of Second Empire architecture, likely as it was executed in brick for a domestic property. However, it displays excellent craftsmanship, in its brickwork, overall design and decorative features, including window mouldings and brackets.

The house was originallyy constructed with a twostory, wraparound verandah on the north and east sides of the house. Between 1914 and 1945, the verandah was removed and a sunroom added to the east side of the building. At present, the verandah has been rebuilt to resemble its
original form, with particular note to the railings and columns on the lower storey. The sunroom has been retained and integrated into the verandah.

Historical and Associative Value

503 Homewood Avenue has historical value as the home of the Bradburn family from approximately 1900 to 1988. As a family, the Bradburns were extremely active in both the political and business communities of twentieth century Peterborough, serving in local and provincial government. The Bradburns were also prominent members of the Peterborough community as a whole and were involved in the overall development of the city
throughout the twentieth century.

The land on which 503 Homewood Avenue is constructed was initially part of the large tract of property owned by George A. Cox. After its transfer to the Toronto Real Estate Company in 1887, the land, including lots 23 and 24 which accommodate 503 Homewood Avenue, was subdivided and sold. Lot 23, in particular, was purchased by Arthur Rutherford, a carpenter and
builder, in 1891. It is likely that Rutherford constructed the house between 1891 and his death in 1893 on this lot. As a builder, he probably participated in the design and construction of the house himself.

It was soon purchased by Thomas Bradburn (1817-1900) in 1893, who had accumulated significant property holdings throughout the late nineteenth century, becoming the largest individual landowner in the Peterborough area. Bradburn also built the Bradburn Opera House and Bradburn Building. The land was subsequently received by his first son from his second marriage, William H. Bradburn (1870-1942), in 1894, although it was not occupied by him at this time, being rented out for a time to a Richard Gough. Bradburn subsequently purchased a portion of lot 24 in 1904, adding to the final parcel of land which comprises 503 Homewood Avenue.

William H. Bradburn is listed as the resident of the property beginning in 1901, having taken up residence there between 1900 and 1901. He lived there until his death in 1942. During this period, Bradburn served on the Town Council, between 1907 and 1912, and served as mayor between 1912 and 1913. During his tenure, new industries were attracted to the city, particularly with the development of electrical utilities and paved streets during his tenure as
mayor. He was later elected as a Conservative MPP in 1923 and again in 1926. He also managed the real estate business established by his father, Bradburn’s Limited. In the 1890s, he was also instrumental in the establishment of organized hockey in the city, as well as being a prominent member of the Masons and the Orange Lodge. He served as the Captain of
the C. Squadron, 3rd Prince of Wales Dragoons.

Bradburn’s son, Herbert I. Bradburn (1904-1988), grew up in this house and occupied it again from 1942, after his father’s death, until his own death in 1988. After studying law at Osgoode Hall, he returned to Peterborough in 1933 to work at Bradburn Limited, eventually taking over from his father. He was also a member of the Rotary Club in Peterborough and was active in the Civil Defense.

Contextual Value

The subject property is historically and visually linked to its surroundings as part of the suburban Old West End neighbourhood. It is located within a neighbourhood of historic 2- and 3-storey brick homes and maintains the historic character of the neighbourhood as a whole through the consistent use of late nineteenth and early twentieth century domestic architectural styles. As part of the wider Cox estate, the property maintains the architectural integrity of the historic neighbourhood.

The property also has contextual value because of its influence in the development of the local neighbourhood. When the land was initially sold to Arthur Rutherford by the Toronto Savings and Loan Company in 1891, building restrictions were placed on the property which stipulated that any building erected was to be worth at least $1500; the building must be set back at least 25 feet from the street; and that no wooden structure of any kind could be erected on the property, implicitly defining the character of the residential area. As a result of these restrictions, the house constructed was of brick and set back significantly from the street. The house was also of a significant size with no wooden outbuildings, a consistent characteristic in the historic neighbourhood. Furthermore, as one of the earliest houses on Homewood Avenue, 503 Homewood Avenue, referred to as “the Bradburn House” explicitly served as a benchmark for development for at least one other house in the neighbourhood, 499 Homewood Avenue, making it both consistent with the surrounding neighbourhood and a landmark for the neighbourhood’s development in the early decades of the twentieth century. Many houses in the local area were subject to similar building restrictions

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR DESIGNATION

503 Homewood Avenue has cultural heritage value or interest as late nineteenth century suburban home and residence of a prominent Peterborough family, the Bradburns, until 1988. It is an excellent example of Second Empire domestic architecture, featuring key components of the style as used in brick houses. Likely constructed between 1891 and 1893, the building is an integral aspect of the Old West End neighbourhood and an important early structure on Homewood Avenue. It is architecturally well executed, displaying a high degree of craftsmanship in its use of the Second Empire style, particularly with regard to the dormer windows and the overall proportions and design of the structure.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all façades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • 2 ½ storey brick structure
  • Second Empire Style
  • Construction set back from the street
  • Granite rubble foundation
  • Brick chimneys on east and west sides of the house
  • Mansard roof with fishscale shingles, including:
    • Decorative roof brackets
  • Reconstructed 2 storey verandah and sunroom
  • Fenestration, including:
    • Original window openings;
    • Wooden window mouldings;
    • Decorative dormer window mouldings;
    • Wooden window trim and brick mould;
    • Stone lintels and lug sills
    • Protruding second-storey window and brackets;
    • Window openings and their associated elements including sash, moulding jambs and trim

King George Public School (220 Hunter St E)

Street Address: 220 Hunter Street East

Roll Number: 040140001000000

Short Legal Description: PT BLK V PL 1A VILLAGE OF ASHBURNHAM AS IN M7616; PETERBOROUGH CITY

PACAC Application Review Date: March 1, 2018

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: February 2018

STATEMENT OF CULTURAL HERITAGE VALUE OR INTEREST:

The subject property has been researched and evaluated in order to determine its cultural heritage significance under Ontario Regulation 9/06 of the Ontario Heritage Act R.S.O. 1990. A property is eligible for designation if it has physical, historical, associative or contextual value and meets any one of the nine criteria set out under Regulation 9/06 of the Act. Staff have determined that 220 Hunter Street East has cultural heritage value or interest and merits designation under the Ontario Heritage Act.

1. The property has design value or physical value because it:

i. is a rare, unique, representative or early example of a style, type, expression, material or construction method:

King George Public School is an excellent example of a civic building constructed as part of the City Beautiful movement, in both its stripped classical aesthetic and its siting within a landscaped lot. The building features key classical elements including: rusticated masonry on the ground floor; a flat roof with classical balustrade; a bracketed metal cornice (since replaced); compositional symmetry on all elevations and H-shaped plan; and rounded arched windows on the east and west elevations. Its role as a monumental civic structure is emphasized through its prominent siting on Armour Hill, consistent with the principles of the City Beautiful movement.

ii. displays a high degree of craftsmanship or artistic merit:

The school displays a high degree of craftsmanship in the excellent use of
structural polychromy in the stone courses, lintels, sills, and rusticated arches
on the east and west elevations.

iii. demonstrates a high degree of technical or scientific achievement:

The school is highly significant for its technical achievement with regard to heating, ventilation, and sanitary facilities. When it was constructed, the school was fitted with complete indoor plumbing, including toilets and drinking fountains, as well as an early version of a forced air heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system. Rarely found outside major urban centres at this time, the system was state of the art in the early 1910s.

2. The property has historical value or associative value because it:

i. has direct associations with a theme, event, belief, person, activity,
organization or institution that is significant to a community:

King George Public School has cultural heritage value as a continuously
operating public school serving East City since 1913. Until the opening of Armour Heights Public School in 1953, it was the only public school serving the Ashburnham area of Peterborough. It is an important institution for the community, particularly for the many generations of students who attended it.

ii. yields, or has the potential to yield, information that contributes to an
understanding of a community or culture:

This building has the potential to yield additional information regarding the role
of education in early twentieth-century Peterborough. In particular, its place as part of the wider City Beautiful movement has the potential to yield information on the interrelationship between architectural design of civic buildings and pedagogical philosophies in the early twentieth century.

iii. demonstrates or reflects the work or ideas of an architect, artist, builder, designer or theorist who is significant to a community:

The school was designed by Napanee architect Fred Bartlett in conjunction with William Blackwell, one of Peterborough’s prominent late nineteenth and early twentieth century architects. After working in Napanee with Chief Dominion Architect Thomas Fuller on the Napanee Post Office, Bartlett relocated to Peterborough in 1892. Blackwell, who appears to have worked with Bartlett on the project, was the architect of many notable Peterborough buildings, including the former YMCA.

The school is also important as a product of the architectural theory of John D. Hodgins, the Deputy Head of the Ontario Department of Education. Hodgin’s influential 1886 text, Hints and Suggestions on School Architecture and Hygiene, played an instrumental role in the development of educational spaces throughout Ontario that actively integrated ideas about hygiene, outdoor space, ventilation, and comfort into design practice.

3. The property has contextual value because it:

i. is important in defining, maintaining or supporting the character of an
area:

The school is a defining feature of the character of the neighbourhood on the Hunter Street East corridor which is composed primarily of nineteenth and early twentieth century buildings. It is one of the main civic buildings in the local area which maintains the historic character of the Ashburnham area. 

ii. is physically, functionally, visually or historically linked to its surroundings

The school is historically and visually linked to its surroundings as part of the wider late nineteenth and early twentieth-century landscape of the Ashburnham area of Peterborough. It forms an important part of the local community which includes many homes constructed during this period as well as other local features constructed to serve the East City area, including Immaculate Conception Roman Catholic Church, Mark Street United Church, and the Hunter Street East commercial area. Taken as part of the wider landscape, King George Public School assists in defining the East City area as a cohesive neighbourhood with localized services and structures.

iii. is a landmark. O. Reg. 9/06, s. 1 (2).

King George Public School is a significant landmark both in Peterborough as a whole and in Ashburnham. As one of the four “Royal” schools constructed in Peterborough in the early twentieth century as major civic projects, the school is a defining feature of the Hunter Street East landscape through its role as the main public school in the area, its distinctive architecture, and its prominent placement on Armour Hill.

Design and Physical Value

King George Public School is an excellent example of a school constructed as part of the wider City Beautiful Movement. This movement, which originated in the United States in the 1890s, sought to reform city planning by introducing schemes for beautification into urban spaces, particularly through the growth of green space and monumental structures. This movement focused on large civic projects constructed in the Beaux Arts or Neoclassical styles alongside parks and green space with the goal of enhancing the livability and image of cities in the face of consistent and significant population increases in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

The school, constructed in 1913 in a restrained neo-classical style using Hamilton brick and Indiana limestone, was built on a landscaped, hillside lot that emphasized its place as a significant civic structure in East City. It features key components of the style which include: rustication on the ground floor; a flat roof; a bracketed, galvanized metal cornice; compositional symmetry; and rounded arches on the east and west elevations. It is an excellent example of monumental classicism in early twentieth-century civic buildings, emphasized by its siting and H-shaped plan and its stripped interpretation of classical design. It is notable for its use of polychromy in the stone courses, lintels, sills, and rusticated arches on the east and west elevations.

The school is also significant for its heating, ventilation, and sanitary facilities. When it was constructed, the school was fitted with complete indoor plumbing, including toilets and drinking fountains as part of an overall emphasis on hygiene and convenience within the design. It was also fitted with an early version of a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system which employed forced air passing over radiations to circulate air throughout the building and to separate the warm air from the gasses produced by coal to prevent contamination. Air was changed within the classrooms four times per hour. This system was extremely modern for its time and rarely found outside major urban centres in the early 1910s. The school was also designed with fire safety in mind, in response to a 1908 fire in Collinwood, Ohio that killed 172 children. Key safety features included the wide, central staircases and hallways which allow for children to rapidly evacuate the building in case of an emergency.

Historical and Associative Value

King George Public School has important historic and associative value on both a local and provincial level. The school was constructed in 1913 as part of a wider plan to update existing Peterborough schools and construct new ones to respond to the city’s growing population and the resultant increase in public school attendance. King George was designed and constructed in conjunction with Queen Mary Public School, on Monaghan Road, as the new schools for the East and West Wards respectively. The schools were constructed on land which was, at that time, at the very edge of the city, to allow for the schools to be built on large lots in elevated locations. When it opened in 1913, King George become the sole public school facility in the Ashburnham area of Peterborough and remained so until 1953 when Armour Heights Public School was opened. The school has operated continuously for over 100 years and is a significant institution for local residents and the wider community, many of whom attended the school as children.

The school was designed by Fred Bartlett, an architect originallyy from Napanee who moved to Peterborough in 1892 and completed a number of commissions in the city. Bartlett is known primary for institutional architecture, including churches and schools. He also worked with Chief Dominion Architect Thomas Fuller on the Napanee Post Office, completed in 1887. Bartlett was joined on the project by Peterborough architect William Blackwell, one of the city’s most prominent late nineteenth and early twentieth century architects. Blackwell’s projects include: the former Peterborough YMCA; Nicholls Hospital; and the Ashburnham Town Hall. 

As part of the wider City Beautiful movement, the school has the potential to yield additional information regarding planning ideals and the role of civic buildings in late nineteenth and early twentieth century Peterborough. The City Beautiful movement developed with the intent of increasing the livability of urban spaces and a major focus of this was the creation of new civic spaces. It was hoped that these new civic structures would be a key location of social reform through the creation of healthy, attractive spaces that would engage people in civic life and assist in the development of a moral and virtuous society. The movement emphasized ideas such as the creation of green space, increased sanitation, and aesthetically-appealing urban areas.
Constructed as part of this movement, the school can yield important information
about how public buildings were viewed in the early twentieth century as the
foundation for the growth of a civil society.

Similarly, the school also has important historical value as a representative example of educational architecture that drew from the principles of John D. Hodgins, the Deputy Head of the Department of Education in the late nineteenth century, and a close associate of Egerton Ryerson. Hodgins’ role in the development of educational policy in late nineteenth and early twentieth century Ontario was significant, but his primary achievement with regard to architecture was his 1886 text, Hints and Suggestions on School Architecture and Hygiene. This text, which influenced educational architecture in Ontario well into the twentieth century, advocated for new schools to be constructed with issues such as hygiene, ventilation, and comfort as primary foci in the design process. This included provisions for infrastructure such as interior plumbing and integrated ventilation systems, as well as the development of outdoors space and the placement of schools on hills to facilitate good drainage and clean air. Hodgins, like many of his contemporaries, had a holistic understanding of health and wellbeing which drew a correlation between cleanliness and the growth of a moral and civil society. He integrated these ideas into his architectural thinking as schools were viewed as one of the primary places where society developed. King George Public School is an excellent example of the kind of school that Hodgins envisioned with its focus on health and comfort as physical requirements for a childhood education that imparted academic knowledge and laid the foundation for a virtuous community. These ideas are reflected in architectural features such as: the high ceilings; the large windows; the modern sanitation, heating, and ventilation facilities; and the siting on an open and airy lot.

Contextual Value

King George Public School is an integral aspect of the wider cultural landscape of the Ashburnham area of Peterborough. Located in an area with a significant collection of late nineteenth and early twentieth century buildings, the school is linked to the local
community through its historical associations and architecture. It forms part of a collection of civic and commercial structures that serve the local neighbourhood including two churches, Immaculate Conception Roman Catholic Church and Mark Street United Church, and the Hunter Street East commercial corridor. Taken alongside these buildings and the local residential areas, the school assists in defining Ashburnham as a holistic neighbourhood with localized services and structures, with a character and history unique from other areas of Peterborough.

Within this context, the school is a significant landmark as the historic educational facility for the local neighbourhood. Its monumental architecture and prominent siting on Armour Hill render it a visible architectural feature and a defining attribute of the Hunter Street East landscape. It is also a significant landmark when viewed as part of the Peterborough landscape as a whole because of its position as one of the four “Royal” schools constructed in the first two decades of the twentieth century to serve the city’s growing population and provide modern, functional educational facilities. These schools, of which only three survive, are architecturally similar to one another and form an important collection of landmark buildings in Peterborough.

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR DESIGNATION

King George Public School has cultural heritage value or interest as an educational facility serving the Ashburnham area of Peterborough. Constructed in 1913, it is an excellent example of a school built as part of the wider City Beautiful movement and integrates important features of that movement including: its siting on a large, open and elevated lot; its integration of features to increase comfort, cleanliness and health; and its use of a classical architectural style. It boasts significant achievements in early twentieth-century hygiene, ventilation, and safety standards alongside excellent design and craftsmanship in its interior and exterior features. It is a significant landmark and defining building in the wider Hunter Street East landscape with important associations for the local community.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all façades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, terracotta, plaster parging, metal, and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • Three-story red brick structure
  • Neo-Classical Style
  • Construction on a landscaped, hillside lot
  • Symmetrical composition, including:
    • H-shaped plan
    • Symmetrical arrangement of windows
    • Central entranceways on east and west elevations
  • Decorative brickwork including:
    • Rustication on the ground floor
    • Pilasters
    • Dentils
    • Recessed forms above the east and west entrances
  • Structural polychromy, including:
    • Stone courses
    • Lintels and sills
    • Rusticated arches above east and west entrances
    • Rusticated limestone foundation
    • Recessed east and west entrances
    • Flat roof, including:
      • Parapet
      • Balustrade
      • Overhanging eaves
      • rackets
      • Metal cornice
    • Fenestration, including:
      • Original window openings, including size and proportion

Interior Elements:

  • Original woodwork including, but not limited to:
    • Glass and wood partitions in hallways and classrooms, including doors
    • Original wooden trim, including door and window surrounds and cornice mouldings
    • Wooden stair rails including handrail, newels, and balusters
  • Original lighting fixtures
  • Interior classroom layout with high ceilings, large windows, and cloakrooms
  • Wide hallways with high ceilings
  • Original stairways

408 Belmont Ave

Street Address: 408 Belmont Avenue

Roll Number: 030050186000000

Short Legal Description: LT 7 & PT LT 8 S WELLER ST & N HUNTER ST, PL 65 AMENDED BY PL 79 AMENDED BY PL 88 PETERBOROUGH AS IN R606261 ; PETERBOROUGH

PACAC Application Review Date: November 1, 2018

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: October 2018

STATEMENT OF CULTURAL HERITAGE VALUE OR INTEREST

The subject property has been researched and evaluated in order to determine its cultural heritage significance under Ontario Regulation 9/06 of the Ontario Heritage Act R.S.O. 1990. A property is eligible for designation if it has physical, historical, associative or contextual value and meets any one of the nine criteria set out under Regulation 9/06 of the Act. Staff have determined that 408 Belmont Avenue has cultural heritage value or interest and merits designation under the Ontario Heritage Act.

1. The property has design value or physical value because it:

i. is a rare, unique, representative or early example of a style, type, expression, material or construction method:

408 Belmont Avenue is an excellent and representative example of the English Cottage style, which developed out of the Arts and Crafts movement and was popular in the early decades of the twentieth century. Featuring an asymmetrical cross gable plan and decorative half timbering, it illustrates the key design tenets of the English Cottage style which aimed to integrate the rustic picturesque into suburban dwellings for the growing upper middle class in the early twentieth century.

ii. displays a high degree of craftsmanship or artistic merit:

408 Belmont displays a high degree of craftsmanship in its overall execution and design by architectural firm Bond and Smith of Toronto. One feature of particular note is the unique recessed entranceway with an ogee arch.

iii. demonstrates a high degree of technical or scientific achievement:

There are no specific technical or scientific achievements associated with this property.

2. The property has historical value or associative value because it:

i. has direct associations with a theme, event, belief, person, activity, organization or institution that is significant to a community:

The property has important historical associations with Peterborough businessman, Claude H. Rogers, the first owner of the house. Rogers was the son of James Z. Rogers, one of the founders of the Ontario Canoe Company and later managing director of the Peterborough Canoe Company. The younger Rogers took over a management role in the Peterborough Canoe

Company in 1909 and, between 1926 and 1928, oversaw the successful merger of the Peterborough Canoe Company, New Brunswick’s Chestnut Canoe Company, and the Canadian Canoe Company into Canadian Watercraft Limited.

ii. yields, or has the potential to yield, information that contributes to an understanding of a community or culture:

408 Belmont has the potential to yield information about the development of upper and upper middle class suburban Peterborough. Specifically, the use of the English Cottage style speaks to the preoccupations of early twentieth century urban professionals to create a retreat away from industrial city life in nearby suburban areas, an increasing trend during this period.

iii. demonstrates or reflects the work or ideas of an architect, artist, builder, designer or theorist who is significant to a community:

408 Belmont Avenue was designed by the Toronto architectural firm Bond and Smith, founded by English architect Charles Herbert Acton Bond and Sandford Fleming Smith, a Peterborough native and the nephew of Sir Sandford Fleming. The firm, which was operational between 1897 and 1914, was both successful and prolific, completing commissions throughout Eastern Canada, including a number of commercial and domestic buildings in Peterborough. The firm became particularly well-known for large private residences for the Toronto elite. They executed a significant number of houses in the English Cottage style in the early 1910s and 408 Belmont Avenue is an excellent example of their work in this style.

3. The property has contextual value because it:

i. is important in defining, maintaining or supporting the character of an area:

The property is important in supporting the character of the neighbourhood as a upper and upper middle class suburb in the developing west end of Peterborough in the early twentieth century. The area has a significant collection of period revival homes of which 408 Belmont is one. It also supports the overall character of the neighbourhood through the placement of the home on a large landscaped lot with mature trees and significant setbacks.

ii. is physically, functionally, visually or historically linked to its surroundings

408 Belmont is historically and visually linked to its surroundings as part of the suburban development of the Old West end neighbourhood in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. It is visually linked to its surroundings through its use of a period revival style, a prominent feature in the streetscape.

iii. is a landmark. O. Reg. 9/06, s. 1 (2).

408 Belmont Avenue is a landmark in the local area due to its distinctive English cottage style, its longstanding presence in the neighbourhood, and its siting at the corner of Belmont Avenue and Hunter Street West, making it visible from a wide range of vantage points.

Design and Physical Value

408 Belmont Avenue, constructed around 1911, is an excellent, representative example of the English Cottage style of architecture, a popular style for domestic buildings in the early twentieth century. The property is a representative example of this style because it retains its original form, details, and massing executed to a high degree of craftsmanship and exemplifies this style of domestic architecture in Peterborough.

The style was born out the Arts and Crafts movement in the late nineteenth century which developed as a reaction to the increasing industrialization of nineteenth-century society and sought to reintroduce handmade and authentic elements into architecture, decorative arts,
and design. The English Cottage style specifically looked to the rural vernacular architecture of England’s medieval villages for inspiration which were seen as having both an intrinsic connection to the non-industrial landscape through their location and materiality and an informal, picturesque aesthetic from their asymmetrical massing and handmade qualities. The style also drew on emerging trends within the Gothic Revival movement that increasingly looked away from historic replication of primarily ecclesiastic forms and towards buildings
techniques and styles more closely associated with medieval domestic design.

Features such as cross gables, half timbering, and red brick were used within an asymmetrical massing intended to recreate the picturesque and rustic aesthetic seen in vernacular buildings in order to suggest, but not directly replicate, medieval design. Pioneered by English architects such as C.F.A. Voysey and Philip Webb, the style was popularized in Canada in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century by Toronto architect Eden Smith, originallyy from Birmingham, whose vast numbers of domestic commissions in the style can be found throughout Toronto’s early twentieth-century suburbs. Charles Herbert Acton Bond and Sandford Fleming Smith, the architects who designed 408 Belmont Avenue, were associated with Eden Smith through Toronto’s Architectural Eighteen Club, later the Toronto Society of
Architects, where both Eden Smith and Bond served on the executive board.

While the cottage, as an architectural form, had historically been associated with England’s farming population, it had, by the eighteenth century, shifted to become a fashionable form with many upper class patrons who looked increasingly to architects to design cottages that integrated the aesthetic features of vernacular housing types into relatively substantial buildings for countryside retreats from gentile society. By the nineteenth century, the form had been adopted by the Arts and Crafts movement and became increasingly popular with the suburban upper middle class who also saw the vernacular cottage as a place for retreat, but rather from urban industrial life with their cottages located within quiet tree-lined suburbs. The architect-designed cottage was intended to create a house that was both homey and authentic without sacrificing the modern comforts and wellenvisaged design that clients of this social
class expected in the early twentieth century.

408 Belmont exemplifies many of the important characteristics of the English Cottage style. Its most prominent feature is its steeply pitched asymmetrical gable on the west elevation of the building facing Belmont Avenue, a key element of the style. Its overall massing is asymmetrical, creating a rustic aesthetic which is further emphasized by the use of brick and stucco on all elevations of the house, the irregular heights of the chimneys, and the asymmetrical placement of small windows throughout the house. The brick, particularly, speaks to the rustic feel of the English Cottage style through its tonal variations. As a whole, the front
elevation of the house further contributes to the asymmetrical, vernacular aesthetic of the house through its irregular massing, a large bay window offset from the centre of the house, and the large chimney which bisects the asymmetrical gable.

The gables on all elevations of the house feature mock half-timbering – exposed wooden beams in-filled with stucco – a specific feature of the English Cottage style drawn directly from medieval English construction. It also features a number of particularly well-executed decorative details included oriel windows on the north and west elevations and the recessed entrance with a distinctive ogee arch. 408 Belmont Avenue is an excellent example of an early
twentieth century English Cottage style house in Peterborough.

The architectural plans for the house still survive and indicate that the exterior of the house has changed little since the design phase. The house’s southern porch is a later addition but has been designed to fit the overall aesthetic of the house and integrates half timbering into its gable end. The rear verandah has also been enclosed and enlarged to form a sunroom.

Historical and Associative Value

408 Belmont Avenue has important historical and associative value through its first owner, Claude Henry Rogers. Rogers came from the prominent Rogers family which had significant business interests in Ashburnham throughout the nineteenth century through his grandfather R.D. Rogers. His uncle, Richard Birdsall Rogers, designed the Peterborough Liftlock. R.D. Rogers’ oldest son, James Zacheus, was Claude Rogers’ father and trained in his father’s retail store and sawmill. However, his primary commercial achievement was the establishment of the Ontario Canoe Company which was incorporated in 1883. J.Z. Rogers was the president and general manager of the company and later manager of its successor, the Peterborough Canoe Company.

J. Z. Rogers died in 1909 and his son Claude, an engineering graduate, took over the management of the manufacturing end of the business. By 1913, he was listed as the vice president of the company, a role he resumed after returning from the First World War in 1919. A key aspect of C.H. Rogers’ legacy in the canoe industry was his role in the merger of the Peterborough Canoe Company with two of its key competitors, New Brunswick’s Chestnut Canoe Company and the Canadian Canoe Company, also located in Peterborough, under the banner of Canadian Watercraft Limited. After the merger, all three companies continued to operate as separate entities with Canadian Watercraft Ltd acting as a holding company. This effectively allowed all three companies to market extremely similar models of canoes without the fierce competition between canoe companies faced by Rogers’ father in the late nineteenth century. Rogers remained in the role of vice-president of the Peterborough Canoe Company until 1946.

Rogers commissioned the home from Toronto architectural firm Bond and Smith in 1910, on a piece of land which had formerly belonged to the Cox estate. He married Eherma Elizabeth Wells in 1911 and they moved into the newly-constructed home. Their four children were born between 1912 and 1920 while they lived in the house. The Rogers family occupied the property until 1925.

The property also holds historical importance as work of the firm Bond and Smith. The firm, which was both successful and prolific during its period of operation between 1897 and 1914, was founded by architect Charles Herbert Acton Bond and Sandford Fleming Smith, the latter of whom was a Peterborough native and the nephew of Sir Sandford Fleming. The firm completed a wide range of designs for different types of buildings throughout their partnership in southern Ontario and throughout Eastern Canada. While most of their work was completed in and around Toronto, they completed a number of domestic and commercial designs in Peterborough. Other designs executed by the firm in Peterborough include a set of row houses constructed for Sir Sandford Fleming at what is now 1, 5, and 11 Fleming Place and the factory and storefront for Barrie’s Furs at 312 George Street North.

By 1910, however, the firm had become well-known as the designer of houses for Toronto’s wealthy elite, mostly located in the Rosedale, Forest Hill and Annex neighbourhoods and mainly executed in the related Tudor Revival and English Cottage styles. Many of these were featured in architectural publications, most often Construction: A Journal for the Architectural, Engineering, and Contracting Interests of Canada, which provided plans and photographs of Bond and Smith’s various commissions, beginning with the journal’s first issue in 1907. Many of the houses featured similar design elements to those at 408 Belmont Avenue as the firm adapted the English Cottage style to fit the varying needs of their clients. In particular, the asymmetrical gable is an important feature in a number of their designs, making 408 Belmont Avenue both consistent with the wider design principles of the English Cottage style and demonstrative of the firm’s domestic work around 1910. Similar work includes a design for a home on Russell Hill Road, Toronto, completed in 1910, which employs the same asymmetrical gable on the street facing elevation, stucco on the upper storey, and oriel windows; the floor plans for this house and 408 Belmont Avenue are virtually identical. 408 Belmont Avenue is
one of the firm’s few residential commissions completed outside of Toronto.

From a broader perspective, the property has the potential to yield important information with regard to the development of upper middle class suburban Peterborough in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In particular, the use of the English Cottage style is directly related to some of the larger ideas driving the development of upper and upper middle class suburbs in the early twentieth century and the property at 408 Belmont is an excellent example of this trend. The English cottage style, specifically, was seen as a style which exemplified a retreat from urban society in newly-developing suburbs where upper and upper middle class people could escape the hustle and bustle of city life because of its associations with rural vernacular architecture. As cities industrialized and expanded, the idea of retreat to suburban areas became increasingly important as upper and upper middle class people desired their domestic space to be located within more naturalistic settings that included wide roads, large gardens, and trees. From a social perspective, the move to suburban neighbourhoods such as the Old West End also underlined a class divide as people of the lower and working classes could not afford to move to these areas and remained in more concentrated urban settings; areas such as the Old West End, therefore, became genteel neighbourhoods defined by their built and natural landscape which were intended to communicate a specific domestic ideal. For a prominent businessman such as Rogers, whose work was intimately tied to Peterborough’s
growing industrial base, a house constructed in this style in the Old West End neighbourhood communicated this ideal, placing it within the wider context of urban growth as it developed along social lines in the early twentieth century.

Contextual Value

408 Belmont Avenue has good contextual value as part of the growing upper and upper middle class suburban development taking place within the Old West neighbourhood during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Historically and visually linked to its surroundings, which include a significant number of period revival homes constructed in the early twentieth
century, the property contributes to the overall character of the streetscape within an historic neighbourhood and is aesthetically linked to its surroundings through construction materials and design features.

The house maintains the character of the neighbourhood through the use of a period revival style consistent with may others within the local neighbourhood and its placement within a large landscaped lot containing mature trees. It fits within the overall streetscape of both Weller Street and Belmont Avenue. The house is placed in a prominent location within the local area and is a landmark corner property that can be seen from multiple vantage points within the neighbourhood. It is a unique design within the neighbourhood, despite the area’s overall stylistic coherence.

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR DESIGNATION

408 Belmont Avenue is an excellent and representative example of an English Cottage style house dating from the early part of the twentieth century. Constructed in 1911, it was designed by the Toronto architectural firm Bond and Smith, whose principals included Sandford Fleming Smith, a Peterborough native and the nephew of Sir Sandford Fleming. It features asymmetrical massing with a unique front half-timbered gable, both of which are characteristic of the style, along with other intact architectural elements inspired by English vernacular architecture. The property also has important historical links to the community through its first owner, Claude H. Rogers whose father, James Rogers, founded the Ontario Canoe Company and was later manager of the Peterborough Canoe Company. As his father’s successor, Claude Rogers successfully oversaw the merger of the Peterborough Canoe Company with the Chestnut Canoe Company and the Canadian Canoe Company to form Canadian Watercraft Limited and was an important member of Peterborough’s early twentieth century business community. 408 Belmont Avenue is an important part of the overall landscape of Peterborough’s Old West End neighbourhood.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all façades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, stucco, concrete, plaster parging, metal, and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Features

  • Two-and-a-half storey red brick residential building
  • Asymmetrical massing
  • Half-timbered gables
  • Steeply pitched cross gable roof
  • Asymmetrical front gable
  • Brick chimneys on north and west elevations
  • Soffits and fascia
  • Recessed entranceway including:
    • Brick ogee arch
    • Knee walls
  • Stucco on second story and in gable ends
  • Imitation buttresses
  • Second storey coursing
  • Rear porches
  • Decorative brickwork including:
    • Arched window surrounds
  • Western bay window with sloped roof
  • Oriel windows with brackets and moulding
  • All original fenestration including:
    • Six-over-six sash windows
    • Leaded casement windows
    • Original window openings
    • Window openings and their associated elements including sash, mould jambs, and trim
    • Original wooden windows
    • Asymmetrical placement of windows
  • View of the house from Weller Street and Belmont Avenue
  • Views of the surrounding of the Old West End neighbourhood from the house
  • Orientation of the house with regard to the street and gardens

415 George St N

Street Address: 415 George Street North

Roll Number: 040060048000000

Short Legal Description: PT LT 1 N OF HUNTER ST AND W OF GEORGE ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH AS IN R447163 CITY OF PETERBOROUGH

PACAC Application Review Date: October 4, 2018

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: September 2018

STATEMENT OF CULTURAL HERITAGE VALUE OR INTEREST

The subject property has been researched and evaluated in order to determine its cultural heritage significance under Ontario Regulation 9/06 of the Ontario Heritage Act R.S.O. 1990. A property is eligible for designation if it has physical, historical, associative or contextual value and meets any one of the nine criteria set out under Regulation 9/06 of the Act. Staff have determined that 415 George Street North has cultural heritage value or interest and merits designation under the Ontario Heritage Act.

1. The property has design value or physical value because it:

i. is a rare, unique, representative or early example of a style, type, expression, material or construction method:

415 George Street North is an excellent, representative example of mid-Victorian commercial architecture in downtown Peterborough with its red brick, three-storey construction that is consistent with the wider landscape of the commercial core. It also features rare and unique components, including ogee-topped windows on the second and third stories.

ii. displays a high degree of craftsmanship or artistic merit:

The building displays a high degree of craftsmanship in its unusual ogee-topped sash windows and wooden hood moulds. The front elevation is a well executed Victorian storefront in red brick, including elements such as the extended cornice and decorative brickwork.

iii. demonstrates a high degree of technical or scientific achievement:

There are no specific technical or scientific achievements associated with this property.

2. The property has historical value or associative value because it:

i. has direct associations with a theme, event, belief, person, activity, organization or institution that is significant to a community:

415 George Street North has cultural heritage value as a longstanding Chinese restaurant in Peterborough, operating successively as the Paris Café (1918-1955) and Hi-Tops Restaurant (1956-2013). The building currently houses Real Thai Cuisine. In its role as a Chinese restaurant, the building has important historical connections to the city’s Chinese community and the Hum family who operated the restaurant from 1918 to 2013.

ii. yields, or has the potential to yield, information that contributes to an understanding of a community or culture:

The subject property yields information regarding the commercial development of mid-nineteenth and twentieth century Peterborough. It also yields information on the growth of Peterborough’s Chinese community and their role in the development of local downtown businesses.

iii. demonstrates or reflects the work or ideas of an architect, artist, builder, designer or theorist who is significant to a community:

The building may be the work of local bricklayer and contractor David Carlisle.

3. The property has contextual value because it:

i. is important in defining, maintaining or supporting the character of an
area:
The property maintains the commercial character of the surrounding area, which is dominated by nineteenth-century three- and four-storey brick structures built to the lot line. The building is a contributing heritage resource to the historic cultural landscape of Peterborough’s commercial downtown.

ii. is physically, functionally, visually or historically linked to its
surroundings

The subject property is historically and physically linked to its surroundings as part of the three-storey commercial row of buildings along the west side of George Street. In particular, the building is physically and visually linked to 413 George Street North, the Lech Building, a designated property of which it is a continuation. The subject property shares specific architectural features with the Lech Building, including the ogee-topped sash windows and wooden hood moulds. It also continues the pattern of windows set between pilasters surmounted by a cornice which is characteristic of commercial architecture in
downtown Peterborough.

iii. is a landmark. O. Reg. 9/06, s. 1 (2).

The storefront of 415 George Street North has operated as a restaurant 1918 and is recognized as a local landmark, specifically as the former Hi-Tops Restaurant which was located in the building from 1956 to 2013. Its distinctive architectural features also make it a well-known building and easily recognized building in the city’s downtown.

Design and Physical Value

415 George Street North is an excellent example of mid-Victorian commercial architecture constructed the Italianate style in downtown Peterborough. Its three-storey, red brick construction is consistent with the wider landscape of the commercial core in style, proportions, and age. It is a representative example of the new style of commercial buildings that developed during the 1860s and possesses unique design features not found in other commercial buildings in Peterborough from this era.

The Italianate commercial style of architecture grew in popularity during the 1860s to become the defining architectural style of many downtowns in cities and towns across North America. The style drew on a vocabulary rooted in the urban forms of the Italian Renaissance and incorporated Italianate architectural details into three- or four-storey compact buildings erected in a densely packed commercial frontage. Architectural elements included: ornate window surrounds; tall windows; pilasters; the division on the street facing façade into multiple bays; a decorative, bracketed cornice, usually made of cast iron; and a defined storefront on the ground level.

415 George Street North is a representative example of Italianate commercial architecture erected in the mid-1860s. It is a three-storey building with a well executed eastern elevation which includes an extended cornice, decorative brickwork and windows set between pilasters. It also features rare and unique components which set it apart from other, similar buildings in the
commercial core. Of particular note are the ogee-topped sash windows with wooden hood moulds. These are unique in the downtown streetscape but are reflective of wider architectural
trends in the early 1860s when the ogee arch was finding increased popularity as a result of mid-Victorian eclecticism. During the nineteenth century, this form was especially associated with Venetian architecture and was used in Italianate buildings, although it was not particularly common.

Historical and Associative Value

415 George Street North has historical and associative value in its role as a commercial property in Peterborough’s downtown core and in its important associations with the city’s early Chinese community.

The current brick structure, which spans both 413 and 415 George Street North, was constructed between 1866 and 1868 to replace an older frame building which had served as a grocery store and bakery. Its construction came as part of the 1860s redevelopment of much of George Street after the 1861 fire which had destroyed a significant
portion of the downtown. The property was purchased by William Cluxton and Robert Rowe in 1864 before being sold to William Lech after the completion of the building. Lech operated his furrier business out of both sides of the building, before selling the northern half in about 1875. Lech’s Furriers continued to operate in 413 George Street North until 2008.

After its sale by Lech, the subject property housed a range of businesses throughout the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Initially a shoe store after Lech’s sale, it was, over the years, successively a grocery store, billiards hall, confectioner, and baker. 

In 1910, the store was converted into a theatre and operated in this capacity until 1918, first as the Princess Theatre and then the Tizit Theatre after 1916. In 1918, it became the Paris Café, a Chinese restaurant operated by Hum Hoy. Several generations of the Hum family continued to operate a Chinese restaurant in the building until 2013, changing its name to Tops Restaurant in 1956 and then to Hi-Tops Restaurant the following year. 

As both the Paris Café and Hi-Tops Restaurant, 415 George Street North has important historical connections with both the Hum family and the history Peterborough’s early Chinese community as a whole. Throughout the first half of the twentieth century, this small but growing community had a significant stake in the local restaurant business: between 1906 and 1942, no less than 13 Chinese restaurants opened in Peterborough, of which the Paris Café/Hi-Tops was the longest running, with 95 years in business in the same location. In its longstanding role as a Chinese restaurant, this property yields significant and important information about the minority Chinese community in Peterborough, their role in the development of downtown businesses, and the way in which these businesses assisted in their immigration to Canada in the early twentieth century.

The first Chinese immigrant in Peterborough, Lee Sam, arrived in the city in 1892 and began his career in the city by operating a hand laundry. Due to pervasive racist attitudes and federal restrictions on Chinese immigrants in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Chinese labour in small cities such as Peterborough was primarily centred on the development of small,
local businesses, including laundries, restaurants, and grocery stores. Particularly in these smaller centres, Chinese immigrants were often shut out of the labour market due to the racist attitudes of this period; the establishment of their own businesses was a route to employment
in predominantly white communities. Not only did the development of these businesses
provide new Chinese immigrants with opportunities to work within Canada’s growing merchant class, they also provided assistance to family members immigrating to the country by creating job opportunities for them when they arrived, with many immigrants bringing their families to Canada to work at their new businesses.

The Tan family, whose name was anglicized to both Hum and Tom, arrived in Peterborough in 1906 and began to develop a range of restaurant businesses, establishing six different Chinese restaurants in Peterborough between 1906 and 1951. Two of these, in particular, became extremely successful: the Dominion Café, later the Deluxe Café, which operated at 328 George Street for 67 years between 1906 and 1973; and the Paris Café, later Hi-Tops, located at 415 George Street North. These restaurants provided important business opportunities and employment for the growing and increasingly successful Chinese community; Hum Hoy, who established the Paris Café in 1918, first came to Canada to work at the Dominion Café in 1909. The Paris Café continued to be operated by the Hum family until its closure in 2013 and provided an opportunity for Hum Hoy to bring other members of his family to Canada to work at the restaurant. After his retirement in 1948, it was taken over by his son Henry Hum who remodelled the restaurant in 1956 and renamed it Tops Restaurant. It was later taken over by his son, Paul Hum, and grandson, Edward Hum.

Contextual Value

The subject property is historically and physically linked to its surroundings as a continuation of the three-storey commercial row of buildings the reconstruction of George Street after the 1861 fire that destroyed a considerable section of the city’s commercial core.

In 1861, a significant portion of George Street was destroyed by fire, leading to the reconstruction of large sections of the city’s commercial downtown. This reconstruction corresponded with a period of rebuilding along many commercial main streets in Canada where frame structures were replaced with brick ones. Many of these new downtown streetscapes featured three- or four storey buildings constructed to the lot line in the Italianate style with heavy, decorative cornices and ornate window surrounds. As in the case of George Street in Peterborough, these rows of commercial buildings developed as continuous blocks of distinctive structures which nevertheless maintained continuity through their consistent style, scale, massing, and window rhythm that created a uniform architectural vocabulary along a compact commercial frontage. 415 George Street North is an integral element of this nineteenth century streetscape in Peterborough as part of unified commercial frontage defined by architecturally-unique structures constructed with a similar style, massing, and scale.

Specifically, 415 George Street North forms part of a continuous block between Hunter Street West and Brock Street with an uninterrupted line of historic buildings. These buildings include, to the south: 407-409 George Street North (Pappas Billiards), constructed in 1867; 413 George
Street North (the Lech Building), constructed between 1866 and 1868; and, to the north: 417-419 George Street North (the Old Examiner Building) constructed in 1875; 421-423 George Street North, likely erected in the 1840s; and 425-427 George Street North (the Chambers-Potvin Building), constructed between 1870 and 1871. Taken together, these buildings form part of a Victorian commercial landscape that defines the character of downtown Peterborough.

Architecturally, the subject property is a direct continuation of its neighbour at 413 George Street North, the Lech Building, of which it was originallyy the northern half. Because they were originallyy constructed as part of the same building, 415 George Street North shares specific architectural features with the Lech Building including the ogee-topped sash windows and wooden hood moulds; the two sides also share the same cornice which runs between both halves of the building.

415 George Street North also continues the pattern of windows set between pilasters surmounted by a cornice which is characteristic of commercial architecture in downtown Peterborough. 415 George Street North is also a landmark building in downtown Peterborough because of its unique stylistic features as well as its longstanding place as the location of Hi-Tops Restaurant. It is recognized as an iconic location within the community because of its long history as a popular Chinese restaurant.

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR DESIGNATION

415 George Street North has cultural heritage value or interest as a mid-Victorian commercial building in downtown Peterborough. Constructed between 1866 and 1868, the building features ogee-topped windows with wooden hood moulds which are both architecturally well-executed and unique to the architecture of the downtown. It is also an integral part of the downtown streetscape through its continuation of the three- and four-storey brick row of commercial structures along George Street, as well as through its structural and visual continuity with its neighbour, the Lech Building. It holds important association with the city’s Chinese community as the longstanding location of Hi-Tops Restaurant. The building is a landmark property, due to its architectural distinctiveness and its history as a popular Chinese restaurant.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all façades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, plaster parging, metal and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Elements:

  • Three-storey brick structure
  • Commercial Italianate style
  • Flat roof, sloping to the rear of the building
  • Construction to the east lot line of the property
  • Contiguousness to the abutting buildings to the north and south
  • Balanced composition of window openings on east elevation
  • Extended cornice
  • Decorative brickwork, including:
    • Dog tooth course
    • Recessed wall planes framed by pilasters
    • Pilasters
  • Fenestration, including:
    • Original ogee-topped window openings
    • Ogee-topped two-over-two sash windows
    • Wooden ogee-shaped hood mould
    • Wooden window trim and brick mould
    • Window sills
    • Window openings and their associated elements including sash, moulding, jambs and trim
  • Viewshed from the property along George Street

487 Hunter St W

Street Address: 487 Hunter Street West

Roll Number:

030050173000000 

030050126000000

Short Legal Description: LTS 1, 2, 25, 26 PL 148; PETERBOROUGH

PACAC Application Review Date: September 6, 2018

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: August 16, 2018

STATEMENT OF CULTURAL HERITAGE VALUE OR INTEREST

The subject property has been researched and evaluated in order to determine its cultural heritage significance under Ontario Regulation 9/06 of the Ontario Heritage Act R.S.O. 1990. A property is eligible for designation if it has physical, historical, associative or contextual value and meets any one of the nine criteria set out under Regulation 9/06 of the Act. Staff have determined that 487 Hunter Street West has cultural heritage value or interest and merits designation under the Ontario Heritage Act.

1. The property has design value or physical value because it:

i. is a rare, unique, representative or early example of a style, type, expression, material or construction method:

This property is a unique example of a house constructed in the Prairie Style in Peterborough. While made popular in the United States through the work of Frank Lloyd Wright and executed in some areas of Canada, this property is the only example of the style in Peterborough.

ii. displays a high degree of craftsmanship or artistic merit:

The property displays a high degree of craftsmanship and artistic merit in both its interior and exterior architectural features which are executed to a high standard of quality. Specific features with notable merit include two banks of stained glass windows featuring stylized floral motifs, the interior woodwork in the dining room, foyer and stairway, and the significant overhanging roofs over the front and side entrances. The property also includes a matching coach house.

iii. demonstrates a high degree of technical or scientific achievement:

There are no specific technical or scientific achievements associated with this property.

2. The property has historical value or associative value because it:

i. has direct associations with a theme, event, belief, person, activity, organization or institution that is significant to a community:

The subject property has direct association with prominent Peterborough businessman, Alva W. Cressman and his family. Cressman, originallyy from Norwich in Oxford County, moved to Peterborough in 1898 and opened a successful department store at 385-393 George Street North. His younger son, Frederick Christie Cressman, enlisted in the RAF during the First World War and was killed in December 1917. He is commemorated on the Peterborough Citizen’s War Memorial. The property is also associated with Ian McRae, the Works Manager of CGE from the mid-1940s to the mid-1960s, who oversaw the Peterborough factory’s wartime production, its conversion back to civilian manufacturing after 1945, and its entry into nuclear power.

ii. yields, or has the potential to yield, information that contributes to an
understanding of a community or culture:

The property has the potential to yield additional information regarding the suburban development of Peterborough in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

iii. demonstrates or reflects the work or ideas of an architect, artist,
builder, designer or theorist who is significant to a community:

487 Hunter Street West was designed by Toronto architect Stephen Burwell Coon, as part of the partnership S.B. Coon and Son. The firm, which operated between 1914 and 1950, was well-known for its educational architecture but also completed a number of residential projects in Toronto and the surrounding area. The firm had competency in a wide range of styles, but the subject property is a rare Prairie style commission.

3. The property has contextual value because it:

i. is important in defining, maintaining or supporting the character of an area:

The property maintains and supports the character of the Old West End, the area in which it is located. Comprised primarily of late nineteenth and early twentieth century residential properties constructed for upper and uppermiddle class families, the house maintains a pattern of stately homes constructed in fashionable architectural styles with wide lawns, mature trees and significant setbacks. The property is a contributing heritage resource to the historic cultural landscape of late nineteenth and early twentieth century suburban Peterborough.

ii. is physically, functionally, visually or historically linked to its surroundings

The property is historically and physically linked to its surroundings as part of the major wave of suburban development that occurred in the Old West End neighbourhood in Peterborough between 1890 and 1920. It is historically linked to its surroundings as part of the upper and upper-middle class development of the area’s suburban landscape. While architecturally distinctive from the surrounding properties, the house was designed to integrate within the wider architectural landscape and includes design elements included in some of the surrounding properties in order to create a harmonious, cohesive streetscape.

iii. is a landmark. O. Reg. 9/06, s. 1 (2).

The property is a landmark within Peterborough as the only Prairie style property in the city. In a more localized context, it is a landmark within the Hunter Street West neighbourhood where it encompasses four lots and is visible from multiple vantage points within the Old West End neighbourhood.

Design and Physical Value

487 Hunter Street West has significant design and physical value as the only Prairie style residence in Peterborough. Constructed between 1915 and 1916, this property is significant both within the local context and within the wider landscape of early twentieth century architecture in Canada as a whole, where relatively few Prairie style buildings were constructed. The style, which developed during the first two decades of the twentieth century, is most closely associated with the work of Frank Lloyd Wright in the Chicago area. The style is characterized by flat or hipped roofs, overhanging eaves, windows grouped in horizontal bands, the use of neutral colours to integrate with the landscape, and minimal ornamentation. It is also marked by the emphasis on horizontal massing and lines which were intended to integrate houses constructed in the style into the relatively flat landscape of the American Midwest. It was introduced in Canada through publications such as House Beautiful magazine and by Canadian architect Francis Conroy Sullivan who studied under Wright before setting up a practice in Ottawa where he designed a number of houses and public buildings in the style. Prairie Style houses in Canada are generally characterized by a more compact format with a greater emphasis on vertical elements than in their American counterparts where horizontal lines and massing were the key defining elements. Constructed in 1915, 487 Hunter Street West is typical of this trend that the horizontal lines evident in the house’s exterior are nevertheless integrated into a design with a clearer focus on vertical massing than in American examples. This is particularly notable because of the large lot which would have allowed for the extended horizontal massing of a more typical American-style Prairie house. The house employs the characteristic neutral colour palette of the Prairie Style through the use of buff brick, cream stucco, stone detailing, and wooden features painted in brown and beige. The wide, overhanging eaves are typical of the style, as is the lack of ornamentation and hipped roof. The house displays a high degree of technical achievement through the use of significant overhangs above the front and side doors which are consistent with Prairie style design. The horizontal lines on the house’s exterior are achieved through horizontal bands of windows on each storey, stone coursing, low brick walls on the north and east elevation, and the selective use of stucco to define the second storey.

The house also retains many of its original interior features including carved wooden panelling, a wide, main staircase offset from the centre of the house, and interior doors. Like the exterior of the house, the interior employs natural materials and minimal embellishment consistent with the Prairie style, although it does not follow the more open plan layout pioneered by Wright. The dining room, foyer, and staircase, in particular, are notable for their retained original features. These include: the wooden beams with shallow pendants in the dining room; interior wooden doors with glass panels; and the tiled entranceway. The basement of the house retains an original stone fireplace. 

The interior stairwell contains two sets of stained glass windows featuring floral designs executed in opalescent glass. While minimal, they are also more figurative than typical Prairie style stained glass and are reflective of wider trends in early twentieth-century stained glass design in their use of abstracted floral and decorative motifs. 

The property also features a coach house which matches the construction and finish of the house. originallyy intended for two vehicles, the building is designed with offset doors on the north and south elevation, where two driveways once entered the property from Homewood Avenue and Hunter Street West.

Historical and Associative Value

The property has historical and associative value through its first owner, Alva W. Cressman. Cressman, originallyy from Norwich, Ontario, moved to Peterborough with his wife Clara and their children in 1898 and opened Cressman’s Department Store, a higher market retail establishment similar to a millinery and clothing store he had operated in Norwich. The store,
located at 385-389 George Street N, was operated by Cressman until 1927 when it was sold to Eaton’s, a year after his wife’s death. His older son, Henry Whiting Cressman, moved to Vancouver that year and Alva followed him in 1928; the property on Hunter Street W was sold
to local surgeon, Dr. Herbert Maxwell Yelland. Both father and son died in Vancouver in 1934
but were interred in the family plot at Little Lake Cemetery.

Cressman was an extremely prosperous member of the Peterborough community and lived in a number of large houses in the city’s developing western suburbs with his family before the construction of the house on Hunter Street West between. The Cressmans had a daughter, Jessie, as well as two sons, Henry and Frederick, both of whom assisted their father in managing the store. Frederick, the younger son, also served with the British Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) at RNAS Stannergate (Dundee) during the First World War. He was one of a significant group of Canadians who enlisted in the RNAS during the First World War and were engaged in marine patrols using large amphibious aircraft, known as flying boats, developed at RNAS Felixstowe. He was buried at sea after his death in a seaplane accident on December 24, 1917. He is commemorated on the Peterborough Citizens War Memorial as well as the Chatham Naval Memorial in Chatham, England, the latter of which commemorates Royal Navy
personnel who were lost or buried at sea.

The property was also the home of CGE Works Manager Ian McRae between 1945 and 1952. McRae held the position of Works Manager at CGE beginning in 1941 and oversaw the Park Street factory’s wartime production. After 1945, he moved the factory back to civilian manufacturing and subsequently, in 1955, helped move CGE into the nuclear power business. The Park Street factory was chosen as the site for the engineering department that would support the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited’s development of the Nuclear Power Demonstration. By 1956, McRae had become CGE’s General Manager of the Civilian Atomic
Power Department. The property also has historical significance as a rare Prairie style house
designed by Toronto architect Stephen Burwell Coon as part of the partnership S.B. Coon and Son. The firm was primarily known for designing schools and, by the 1930s, was one of the province’s most prolific firms with regard to educational architecture. However, Coon also designed a number of stately homes for wealthy clients in Toronto and surrounding area. 487 Hunter Street West appears to be the only house he designed in the Prairie style and one of the few commissions he completed outside of Toronto.

Contextual Value

487 Hunter Street West is historically and physically linked to its surroundings as part of the suburban Old West End neighbourhood. It is located in an area of 2- and 3-storey brick homes and maintains the proportions, sizing, and materiality of the houses in the surrounding area, most of which were constructed in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Its placement within a large, landscaped lot is consistent with the overall arrangement of buildings within the neighbourhood. It is a key contributing structure to the overall landscape of the Old West End.

While constructed in a style not found elsewhere in the immediate neighbourhood or in the city as a whole, the design of this property is sympathetic to the character of the surrounding properties through the use of a classically-inspired symmetry on the street-facing façade. While the rear of the property exhibits the typical asymmetrically and naturalistic massing of the Prairie style, the symmetry on the street facing side, which is atypical of Prairie style design, allows the property to fit within the wider context of a late-nineteenth and early twentieth century neighbourhood where the majority of the properties were constructed in Victorian or revival styles.

The property is a landmark within the neighbourhood due to its size and stylistic distinctiveness. The property encompasses four city lots, the entirely of which has been retained and conveyed together since 1915, having been originallyy severed from the George A. Cox Estate. It is the largest property in the Old West neighbourhood and its size and location allow it to be viewed from Hunter Street West, Belmont Avenue and Homewood Avenue. These important views contribute to its landmark status within the neighbourhood. As the only Prairie style house in Peterborough, its unique architectural character also makes it a landmark within the city as a whole.

The property is a landmark within the neighbourhood due to its size and stylistic distinctiveness. The property encompasses four city lots, the entirely of which has been retained and conveyed together since 1915, having been originallyy severed from the George A. Cox Estate. It is the largest property in the Old West neighbourhood and its size and location allow it to be viewed from Hunter Street West, Belmont Avenue and Homewood Avenue. These important views contribute to its landmark status within the neighbourhood. As the only Prairie style house in Peterborough, its unique architectural character also makes it a landmark within the city as a whole.

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR DESIGNATION
487 Hunter Street West has cultural heritage value or interest as the only Prairie style house in Peterborough and in its connection with local businessman Alva W. Cressman. It is an excellent and rare example of the Prairie style constructed in Canada which placed a greater emphasis on vertical massing than in American examples. It retains its original exterior and interior features virtually intact, including built elements on the property outside of the house such as the carriage house, which display a high degree of craftsmanship executed by an architect, S.B. Coons, who did not usually work in the Prairie style. Despite its stylistic distinctiveness, it is nevertheless an integral part of the Old West End neighbourhood due to its size, massing, and materiality as well as its carefully conceived design, executed in such a way as to be sympathetic to the overall character of the turn-of-the-century neighbourhood as a whole.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all façades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, stucco, concrete, plaster parging, metal, and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Features:

  • Two-and-a-half story buff brick residential building with cream stucco on the second storey
  • Symmetrical front elevation
  • Asymmetrical massing
  • Hipped roof
  • Soffits and fascia
  • Brick chimneys on south, east and west elevations
  • Decorative brickwork
  • Stone courses
  • Rustication on doors and window surrounds
  • Wide overhanging eaves with wooden moulding
  • Buff brick outbuilding including hipped roof, original windows, offset doors, and original hardware
  • Bow windows on north elevation
  • Bay windows on east elevation including cream stucco
  • Front dormer with bank of five windows and overhanging roof
  • Rear dormer with single window and overhanging roof
  • Front entrance including:
    • Buff brick knee walls with stone coping
    • Central stairs
    • Asymmetrical arrangement of doors and side window
    • Pilasters
  • Overhanging roofs at north and west elevations including:
    • Decorative wooden ceiling
    • Wooden moulding
    • Original light fixtures
    • Decorative braces
  • Knee wall on west elevation
  • Covered porch on east elevation including:
    • Buff brick piers and knee walls,
    • Wide overhanging roof and associated moulding
    • Stone courses and steps
    • Flat roof
  • Fenestration including:
    • Original window openings
    • Window openings and their associated elements including sash, moulds, jambs, and trim
    • Original wooden windows
  • Unobstructed view of the property from Homewood Avenue, Belmont Avenue, and Hunter Street W
  • View of the surrounding neighbourhood from the house and grounds
  • Orientation of the house relative to the streets and gardens

Interior Features

  • All original wooden elements including:
    • panelling and trim
    • Interior doors, including glass
    • Dining roof ceiling with decorative beams and shallow pendant posts
  • Original stained glass
  • Main staircase and associated decorative elements including:
    • Handrail and spindles
    • Newel posts with pendants
  • Stone basement fireplace
  • Patterned, tiled floor at main entrance
  • Original hardware including door and window handles

678 Bethune St

Street Address: 678 Bethune Street

Roll Number: 040080093000000

Short Legal Description: PT LT 9 S OF ANTRIM ST & W OF GEORGE ST PL 1 TOWN OF PETERBOROUGH PTS 2 & 3 45R9508 ; PETERBOROUGH CITY

PACAC Application Review Date: September 6, 2018

Heritage Type: Built Structure

Designation Type: Ontario Heritage Act – Part IV

Designation Brief Completion Date: August 2018

STATEMENT OF CULTURAL HERITAGE VALUE OR INTEREST

The subject property has been researched and evaluated in order to determine its cultural heritage significance under Ontario Regulation 9/06 of the Ontario Heritage Act R.S.O. 1990. A property is eligible for designation if it has physical, historical, associative or contextual value and meets any one of the nine criteria set out under Regulation 9/06 of the Act. Staff have determined that 678 Bethune Street has cultural heritage value or interest and merits designation under the Ontario Heritage Act.

1. The property has design value or physical value because it:

i. is a rare, unique, representative or early example of a style, type, expression, material or construction method:

678 Bethune Street is an excellent, early, and intact example of a midnineteenth century Ontario Gothic cottage. Constructed around 1853, it is a frame building that was clad in brick. It is an important, representative example of this housing type in the Peterborough area.

ii. displays a high degree of craftsmanship or artistic merit:

The house displays a standard degree of craftsmanship typical of the era.

iii. demonstrates a high degree of technical or scientific achievement:

There are no specific technical or scientific achievements associated with this property.

2. The property has historical value or associative value because it:

i. has direct associations with a theme, event, belief, person, activity, organization or institution that is significant to a community:

The property has had a series of owners since its construction, many of whom were tradespeople working in Peterborough. In the early twentieth century, the property was owned by prominent Peterborough businessman George A. Cox, who accumulated significant real estate holdings in the city.

ii. yields, or has the potential to yield, information that contributes to an understanding of a community or culture:

The property has the potential to yield additional information on how the lower middle classes in Peterborough approached the construction of their homes in contemporary architectural styles through the use of pattern books as a design source.

iii. demonstrates or reflects the work or ideas of an architect, artist, builder, designer or theorist who is significant to a community:

The designer of the building is not known, although it is recorded that the builder was a Mr. Smith of Otonabee. There is no additional information on the builder.

3. The property has contextual value because it:

i. is important in defining, maintaining or supporting the character of an
area:

The property is important in maintaining and supporting the character of the surrounding neighbourhood which is comprised primarily of historic properties that date from the mid-nineteenth century to the early twentieth century. It is one of the oldest properties in the neighbourhood.

ii. is physically, functionally, visually or historically linked to its surroundings

678 Bethune Street is historically and visually linked to its surroundings by its placement facing away from both Antrim and Bethune Streets and towards downtown Peterborough and the Otonabee River. Located at the top of the Bethune Street hill, the house was oriented in such a way to take advantage of the sweeping view towards the river and downtown core. The relationship of the house to the surrounding physical landscape and its associated viewshed is an important heritage attribute of the property.

iii. is a landmark. O. Reg. 9/06, s. 1 (2).

The property is a landmark within the neighbourhood due to its longstanding historic presence and visible presence on a corner lot.

Design and Physical Value

678 Bethune Street has design value as an excellent, early, and intact example of a mid-ineteenth century Ontario Gothic cottage. Constructed around 1853, it is a frame structure, clad in brick, and includes a main, rectangular section of the house and a kitchen wing, which is typical of this house type. While this was a style of house that was extremely popular in both Peterborough and Ontario as a whole during the mid-nineteenth century, 678 Bethune Street is one of the best examples of an Ontario Gothic cottage in Peterborough because it integrates and retains many of the key elements of this housing type as executed in the middle of the nineteenth century. It is representative of the style in that it demonstrates and retains the key elements of the style in its built form. Its date of construction also makes it an early example
of this style which was just beginning to develop around the time the house was constructed.

The Gothic cottage was probably the most popular architectural form in mid-nineteenth century domestic design in Ontario. While the ornate Gothic Revival style had become increasingly popular throughout the early nineteenth century, it was generally applied to larger houses for
more prosperous clients. At the same time, there was increasing concern that working and lower middle class people were not appropriately housed, both from the perspective of building
quality and architectural taste. Since the late seventeenth century, architects and theorists, particularly in the United Kingdom, had promoted the development of designs for “cottages” aimed at these lower classes, including labourers, farmers and tradespeople, which blended structural improvements with the aesthetic theory of the picturesque into buildings that were architecturally interesting, practical, and affordable. By the early nineteenth century, many cottage designs had been produced and published in architectural texts, including those which integrated features of the increasingly popular Gothic Revival movement, such as steeply pitched roofs and decorative woodwork, into smaller buildings that were appropriate for less wealthy segments of the population.

The Gothic cottage form was popularized in print media where numerous books and journals published patterns for cottage architecture using forms associated with the Gothic Revival movement. These publications originated in the United Kingdom in the late seventeenth century and quickly spread to North America where they provided extremely popular models in new and developing communities. By the end of the nineteenth century, the use of this housing type had become so widespread in Ontario that the house type is generally known as an Ontario Gothic cottage, despite the fact that it had more widespread origins.

While published after the initial construction of 678 Bethune Street, one of the most influential texts on this subject in Ontario was The Canadian Farmer, a periodical which began publication in 1864 and had a regular column on rural architecture featuring designs for Gothic cottages similar to the subject property; while the periodical was primarily aimed at rural populations, these designs were frequently used by people in small towns and on the outskirts of larger ones looking to build in the picturesque aesthetic promoted both in the magazine and by other designers. While the designs published in this periodical assisted in the spread of the style, they were not original and drew on existing sources dating back to the 1830s which, directly or indirectly, would have informed the design of 678 Bethune Street. Images published in the magazine show the ubiquitous three-bay, symmetrical form with a front gable and kitchen wing. An article discussing “A Small Gothic Cottage” even recommends the use of red brick with
buff brick quoins as a means to introduce ornamentation in the house through structural polychromy, one of the defining features of 678 Bethune Street. While 678 Bethune Street was constructed before the publication of this article, the discussion of this specific element in a well-known publication places the house firmly within this tradition and demonstrates the familiarity of the builder with these wider trends in domestic design.

678 Bethune Street has a number of important and well-preserved features that are characteristic of the Ontario Gothic cottage. These include a gable roof; the use of polychromatic brick to add ornamentation to a basic, rectangular overall design; symmetrical front and side elevations with central doorway and sash windows; and a central gable with a steeply pitched roof and rounded window. The house also retains most of its original windows, including a significant amount of original glass. The south elevation is defined by a verandah with an awning roof, chamfered columns and ornate wooden brackets that extends across the front of the house; while the verandah and its decorative elements were likely added after the initial construction of the house, they are an important part of this architectural style and were recommended in print publications for practical and aesthetic purposes.

One of the notable features of this design is the kitchen wing, a one-storey wooden addition that was clad in brick in the early twentieth century to match the rest of the house. The majority of Ontario Gothic cottages, both in Peterborough and elsewhere, were constructed with a kitchen wing to keep the cooking separate from the main body of the house. Kitchen wings were primarily constructed on the back of the house in order to preserve the symmetry of the overall design when viewed from the front of the building; this is the case both in practice and as recommended in published material, including The Canadian Farmer. The kitchen wing on 678 Bethune Street, however, is on the side of the house because of the placement of the house at the back of the lot adjacent to Antrim Street. The placement of the house in this location was likely to take advantage of its picturesque setting at the top of the hill with sloping lawns which would have originallyy had a view of the town below and the river. This consideration also accounts for the fact that the house faces away from both Bethune and Antrim streets.

Historical and Associative Value

678 Bethune Street has historical value as a house constructed for a tradesperson in mid-nineteenth century Peterborough. The property has important historical value in its use of popular design features as published in pattern books and other textual sources and integrated into a modest residential design without the use of a professional architect.

The house was constructed around 1853 for William West, a local millwright who purchased the
property in 1852. West, however, did not live in the house and rented it out. The first tenants were James Doris, a carpenter, his wife Ellen, and their family. The family lived at the property until at least 1860 when James froze to death on Monaghan Road; the Examiner for February 23, 1860 speculated that he had “indulged too freely in spirituous liquors and mistook his way.” The property was purchased in 1870 by George Cook, a sawyer, and in 1876, John Cook, a millwright who lived in the property until 1879. The property was eventually purchased by George A. Cox in 1905, although he did not live there. The house was occupied by Philip Lane and his wife Martha, a relative of Cox. Martha Lane, along with her daughter Emma, was bequeathed the house in Cox’ will for the term of their natural lives. The property was purchased by Henry Bradshaw, a milkman, and his wife Alice in 1921 and it remained in the Bradshaw family until 1989.

However, the property’s primary historical and associative importance lies in its role as an example of mid-nineteenth century housing for Peterborough’s lower middle classes, as exemplified by the early occupants of the house who were primarily tradespeople. During this period, while many people of these means wished to construct houses that reflected the current fashion of the day, they likely did not have the means to hire a professional architect. As a result, the use of pattern books proliferated as an inexpensive way to procure fashionable designs for houses. While the source of the design for 678 Bethune Street is not known, the property has specific design features which can also be found in contemporary pattern book publications. The property has the potential to yield information as to how Peterborough’s lower middle classes viewed and approached the construction of their home and used means other than professional architects to achieve a design that was both fashionable and cost effective.

Contextual Value

678 Bethune Street has contextual value as part of the wider Smith Town Hill historic neighbourhood, comprised primarily of nineteenth century homes. This includes a number of other properties, likely constructed around the midnineteenth century, with which it shares architectural features, including a Gothic cottage directly to the north on Antrim Street. 678
Bethune Street is one of the oldest properties in the neighbourhood. Overall, it is an important contributing feature of the local historic neighbourhood and an important local landmark due to its longstanding presence in the area and its prominent location on a corner lot.

The property also has important contextual value in its relationship to the physical landscape.
Constructed on the corner of Bethune and Antrim street on what was originallyy a much larger
lot, the house faces away from both roads, towards downtown Peterborough and the Otonabee
River. In the 1850s, prior to much of the surrounding development, it would have commanded a sweeping view of the city’s downtown core, the river and the rural landscape beyond with few physical obstructions. This view was not only pleasant for the occupant of the house, but is also reflective of the picturesque genre with which this housing type was originallyy associated and which romanticized the views and aesthetics of the scenic pastoral landscape and its integrated, but subsidiary, architectural forms. While the surrounding area was built up throughout the second half of the nineteenth century and some of the view obstructed by tree growth, the house retains its important relationship with the landscape and its associated views of the river and city. The relationship of the house to the surrounding physical landscape and its associated viewshed is an important historic attribute of the property.

SHORT STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR DESIGNATION

678 Bethune Street has cultural heritage value or interest as an intact, early, and excellent example of an Ontario Gothic cottage in Peterborough. Constructed in the mid-1850s, the property retains many of its original architectural features including the red brick cladding with buff brick quoins, steeply pitched central gable with a rounded window, and a verandah extending across the front of the house. Its setting at the top of the hill gave the property an historic view toward the Otonabee River and downtown Peterborough which exemplifies the qualities of the picturesque that were associated with this housing type. It is one of the oldest houses an historic neighbourhood of primarily nineteenth and early twentieth century homes and maintains the character of the wider area through its retained historic features.

SUMMARY OF HERITAGE ATTRIBUTES TO BE DESIGNATED

The Reasons for Designation include the following heritage attributes and apply to all elevations and the roof including all façades, entrances, windows, chimneys, and trim, together with construction materials of wood, brick, stone, stucco, concrete, plaster parging, metal, and glazing, their related building techniques and landscape features:

Exterior Features

  • One-and-a-half storey frame residential building with red brick cladding
  • Rubble stone foundation
  • Rectangular massing of main portion of the building
  • One storey kitchen addition on the east elevation
  • Gable roof
  • Symmetry of the south and west elevations
  • Buff brick quoins and base
  • Brick chimneys on the north and east elevations
  • Centre gable on the south elevation
  • Soffits and fascia with decorative wooden moulding
  • Central rounded window on south elevation with six over six sash windows and radiating buff brick voussoir
  • South elevation verandah including:
    • Awning roof
    • Chamfered columns
    • Decorative wooden porch brackets
  • Central entrance including:
    • Sidelights
    • Transom window
    • Buff brick flat voussoir
    • Associated moulding
  • West elevation kitchen addition doorway
  • All original fenestration including:
    • Six over six sash windows
    • Two over two sash windows
    • Original window openings
    • Window openings and their associated elements including sash, mould, jamb, and trim
    • Original wooden windows
    • Symmetrical placement of windows on the south and west elevations
    • Original glass
    • Wooden shutters and hardware
    • Buff brick flat and radiating voussoirs
  • Viewshed from the house toward the Otonabee River and downtown Peterborough
  • View of the south elevation of the house from Bethune Street
  • View of the house from the intersection of Parkhill Road and Bethune Street
  • Orientation of the house relative to the roads, hill, and garden